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Cell or cell membrane-based drug delivery systems.

Tan S, Wu T, Zhang D, Zhang Z - Theranostics (2015)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, in view of their host attributes, they may achieve different biological effects and/or targeting specificity, which can meet the needs of personalized medicine as the next generation of DDS.In this review, we summarized the recent progress in cell or cell membrane-based DDS and their fabrication processes, unique properties and applications, including the whole cells, EVs and cell membrane coated nanoparticles.We expect the continuing development of this cell or cell membrane-based DDS will promote their clinic applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. Tongji School of Pharmacy; ; 2. National Engineering Research Center for Nanomedicine; ; 3. Hubei Engineering Research Center for Novel DDS, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, P R China.

ABSTRACT
Natural cells have been explored as drug carriers for a long period. They have received growing interest as a promising drug delivery system (DDS) until recently along with the development of biology and medical science. The synthetic materials, either organic or inorganic, are found to be with more or less immunogenicity and/or toxicity. The cells and extracellular vesicles (EVs), are endogenous and thought to be much safer and friendlier. Furthermore, in view of their host attributes, they may achieve different biological effects and/or targeting specificity, which can meet the needs of personalized medicine as the next generation of DDS. In this review, we summarized the recent progress in cell or cell membrane-based DDS and their fabrication processes, unique properties and applications, including the whole cells, EVs and cell membrane coated nanoparticles. We expect the continuing development of this cell or cell membrane-based DDS will promote their clinic applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

RBC-bound allophycocyanin uptake by splenic DC subsets and nonprofessional APCs in the liver. (a) Increased cellular uptake of ERY1-allophycocyanin by MHC II+ CD11b- CD11c+ and MHC II+ CD8α+ CD11c+ CD205+ splenic DCs at 12 and 36 h postinjection, compared with MIS-allophycocyanin. (b) Increased cellular uptake of ERY1-allophycocyanin in the liver by hepatocytes (CD45- MHC IIlow CD1d-) and hepatic stellate cells (CD45- MHC II+ CD1d+) but not by liver DCs (CD45+ CD11c+) or Kupffer cells (CD45+ MHC II+ F4/80+), compared with MIS-allophycocyanin, 36 h following i.v. administration (n = 2). *P ≤ 0.05; **P ≤ 0.01; ***P ≤ 0.001. Data represent mean ± SE. (c) Spleen microscopy images of mice 24 h following administration of 10 μg OVA(Left) or ERY1-OVA(Right), stained for OVA (green), F4/80 (red), and DAPI nuclear staining (blue). (Scale bar = 50 μm.) (d) Liver microscopy images of mice 24 h following administration of 10 μg OVA (Left) or ERY1-OVA (Right), stained for MHC I H-2Kb-SIINFEKL (green), CD45 (red), and DAPI for nuclear staining (blue). (Scale bar = 50 μm.) Reproduced with permission58. Copyright 2014, ACS.
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Figure 3: RBC-bound allophycocyanin uptake by splenic DC subsets and nonprofessional APCs in the liver. (a) Increased cellular uptake of ERY1-allophycocyanin by MHC II+ CD11b- CD11c+ and MHC II+ CD8α+ CD11c+ CD205+ splenic DCs at 12 and 36 h postinjection, compared with MIS-allophycocyanin. (b) Increased cellular uptake of ERY1-allophycocyanin in the liver by hepatocytes (CD45- MHC IIlow CD1d-) and hepatic stellate cells (CD45- MHC II+ CD1d+) but not by liver DCs (CD45+ CD11c+) or Kupffer cells (CD45+ MHC II+ F4/80+), compared with MIS-allophycocyanin, 36 h following i.v. administration (n = 2). *P ≤ 0.05; **P ≤ 0.01; ***P ≤ 0.001. Data represent mean ± SE. (c) Spleen microscopy images of mice 24 h following administration of 10 μg OVA(Left) or ERY1-OVA(Right), stained for OVA (green), F4/80 (red), and DAPI nuclear staining (blue). (Scale bar = 50 μm.) (d) Liver microscopy images of mice 24 h following administration of 10 μg OVA (Left) or ERY1-OVA (Right), stained for MHC I H-2Kb-SIINFEKL (green), CD45 (red), and DAPI for nuclear staining (blue). (Scale bar = 50 μm.) Reproduced with permission58. Copyright 2014, ACS.

Mentions: The apoptosis-like programmed cell death of RBCs was also used to induce antigen-specific T-cell deletion58. Antigens (such as OVA and peptide islet β-cell autoantigen) were anchored onto the RBCs surface via binding peptide or fusion antibody fragment (against RBC-specific cell surface marker glycophorin A). Compared with mismatch scrambled peptide, OVA coated RBCs were phagocytosed more efficiently by splenic MHC II+ CD11b- CD11c+ DCs, hepatocytes (CD45-MHC IIlow CD1d-) and hepatic stellate cells (CD45- MHC II+ CD1d+), which triggered CD8+ T-cell deletional tolerance, but not by the liver DCs (CD45+ CD11c+) or Kupffer cells (CD45+ MHC II+ F4/80+) (Figure 3). This would induce PD-1 signal related deletional proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, this technology was exploited to treat autoimmune type 1 diabetes in a transgenic islet β cell-reactive CD4+ T-cell adoptive transfer model. The activated pathogenic islet-specific CD4+ T cells were successfully deleted with zero morbidity of diabetes for 62 days following adoptive transfer.


Cell or cell membrane-based drug delivery systems.

Tan S, Wu T, Zhang D, Zhang Z - Theranostics (2015)

RBC-bound allophycocyanin uptake by splenic DC subsets and nonprofessional APCs in the liver. (a) Increased cellular uptake of ERY1-allophycocyanin by MHC II+ CD11b- CD11c+ and MHC II+ CD8α+ CD11c+ CD205+ splenic DCs at 12 and 36 h postinjection, compared with MIS-allophycocyanin. (b) Increased cellular uptake of ERY1-allophycocyanin in the liver by hepatocytes (CD45- MHC IIlow CD1d-) and hepatic stellate cells (CD45- MHC II+ CD1d+) but not by liver DCs (CD45+ CD11c+) or Kupffer cells (CD45+ MHC II+ F4/80+), compared with MIS-allophycocyanin, 36 h following i.v. administration (n = 2). *P ≤ 0.05; **P ≤ 0.01; ***P ≤ 0.001. Data represent mean ± SE. (c) Spleen microscopy images of mice 24 h following administration of 10 μg OVA(Left) or ERY1-OVA(Right), stained for OVA (green), F4/80 (red), and DAPI nuclear staining (blue). (Scale bar = 50 μm.) (d) Liver microscopy images of mice 24 h following administration of 10 μg OVA (Left) or ERY1-OVA (Right), stained for MHC I H-2Kb-SIINFEKL (green), CD45 (red), and DAPI for nuclear staining (blue). (Scale bar = 50 μm.) Reproduced with permission58. Copyright 2014, ACS.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 3: RBC-bound allophycocyanin uptake by splenic DC subsets and nonprofessional APCs in the liver. (a) Increased cellular uptake of ERY1-allophycocyanin by MHC II+ CD11b- CD11c+ and MHC II+ CD8α+ CD11c+ CD205+ splenic DCs at 12 and 36 h postinjection, compared with MIS-allophycocyanin. (b) Increased cellular uptake of ERY1-allophycocyanin in the liver by hepatocytes (CD45- MHC IIlow CD1d-) and hepatic stellate cells (CD45- MHC II+ CD1d+) but not by liver DCs (CD45+ CD11c+) or Kupffer cells (CD45+ MHC II+ F4/80+), compared with MIS-allophycocyanin, 36 h following i.v. administration (n = 2). *P ≤ 0.05; **P ≤ 0.01; ***P ≤ 0.001. Data represent mean ± SE. (c) Spleen microscopy images of mice 24 h following administration of 10 μg OVA(Left) or ERY1-OVA(Right), stained for OVA (green), F4/80 (red), and DAPI nuclear staining (blue). (Scale bar = 50 μm.) (d) Liver microscopy images of mice 24 h following administration of 10 μg OVA (Left) or ERY1-OVA (Right), stained for MHC I H-2Kb-SIINFEKL (green), CD45 (red), and DAPI for nuclear staining (blue). (Scale bar = 50 μm.) Reproduced with permission58. Copyright 2014, ACS.
Mentions: The apoptosis-like programmed cell death of RBCs was also used to induce antigen-specific T-cell deletion58. Antigens (such as OVA and peptide islet β-cell autoantigen) were anchored onto the RBCs surface via binding peptide or fusion antibody fragment (against RBC-specific cell surface marker glycophorin A). Compared with mismatch scrambled peptide, OVA coated RBCs were phagocytosed more efficiently by splenic MHC II+ CD11b- CD11c+ DCs, hepatocytes (CD45-MHC IIlow CD1d-) and hepatic stellate cells (CD45- MHC II+ CD1d+), which triggered CD8+ T-cell deletional tolerance, but not by the liver DCs (CD45+ CD11c+) or Kupffer cells (CD45+ MHC II+ F4/80+) (Figure 3). This would induce PD-1 signal related deletional proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, this technology was exploited to treat autoimmune type 1 diabetes in a transgenic islet β cell-reactive CD4+ T-cell adoptive transfer model. The activated pathogenic islet-specific CD4+ T cells were successfully deleted with zero morbidity of diabetes for 62 days following adoptive transfer.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, in view of their host attributes, they may achieve different biological effects and/or targeting specificity, which can meet the needs of personalized medicine as the next generation of DDS.In this review, we summarized the recent progress in cell or cell membrane-based DDS and their fabrication processes, unique properties and applications, including the whole cells, EVs and cell membrane coated nanoparticles.We expect the continuing development of this cell or cell membrane-based DDS will promote their clinic applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. Tongji School of Pharmacy; ; 2. National Engineering Research Center for Nanomedicine; ; 3. Hubei Engineering Research Center for Novel DDS, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, P R China.

ABSTRACT
Natural cells have been explored as drug carriers for a long period. They have received growing interest as a promising drug delivery system (DDS) until recently along with the development of biology and medical science. The synthetic materials, either organic or inorganic, are found to be with more or less immunogenicity and/or toxicity. The cells and extracellular vesicles (EVs), are endogenous and thought to be much safer and friendlier. Furthermore, in view of their host attributes, they may achieve different biological effects and/or targeting specificity, which can meet the needs of personalized medicine as the next generation of DDS. In this review, we summarized the recent progress in cell or cell membrane-based DDS and their fabrication processes, unique properties and applications, including the whole cells, EVs and cell membrane coated nanoparticles. We expect the continuing development of this cell or cell membrane-based DDS will promote their clinic applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus