Limits...
Comprehensive confocal endomicroscopy of the esophagus in vivo.

Kang D, Schlachter SC, Carruth RW, Kim M, Wu T, Tabatabaei N, Vacas-Jacques P, Shishkov M, Woods K, Sauk JS, Leung J, Nishioka NS, Tearney GJ - Endosc Int Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Very large confocal microscopy images (length = 5 cm; circumference = 2.2 cm) of swine esophagus from three imaging depths, spanning a total area of 33 cm(2), were obtained in about 2 minutes.SECM images enabled the visualization of cellular morphology of the swine esophagus, including stratified squamous cell nuclei, basal cells, and collagen within the lamina propria.The results from this study suggest that the SECM technology can rapidly provide large, contiguous confocal microscopy images of the esophagus in vivo.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Massachusetts General Hospital - Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, MA.

ABSTRACT

Background and study aims: Biopsy sampling error can be a problem for the diagnosis of certain gastrointestinal tract diseases. Spectrally-encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a high-speed reflectance confocal microscopy technology that has the potential to overcome sampling error by imaging large regions of gastrointestinal tract tissues. The aim of this study was to test a recently developed SECM endoscopic probe for comprehensively imaging large segments of the esophagus at the microscopic level in vivo.

Methods: Topical acetic acid was endoscopically applied to the esophagus of a normal living swine. The 7 mm diameter SECM endoscopic probe was transorally introduced into the esophagus over a wire. Optics within the SECM probe were helically scanned over a 5 cm length of the esophagus. Confocal microscopy data was displayed and stored in real time.

Results: Very large confocal microscopy images (length = 5 cm; circumference = 2.2 cm) of swine esophagus from three imaging depths, spanning a total area of 33 cm(2), were obtained in about 2 minutes. SECM images enabled the visualization of cellular morphology of the swine esophagus, including stratified squamous cell nuclei, basal cells, and collagen within the lamina propria.

Conclusions: The results from this study suggest that the SECM technology can rapidly provide large, contiguous confocal microscopy images of the esophagus in vivo. When applied to human subjects, the unique comprehensive, microscopic imaging capabilities of this technology may be utilized for improving the screening and surveillance of various esophageal diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

 SECM and representative, nearby en face histologic images taken at the same respective transverse locations but at different imaging depths. The imaging depth changes from superficial (a and d) to deep (c and f), with a depth difference of 14 µm between images. The SECM images were taken from the region marked by box 4 in Fig. 2 a (scale bar = 100 µm).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440396&req=5

FI047-4:  SECM and representative, nearby en face histologic images taken at the same respective transverse locations but at different imaging depths. The imaging depth changes from superficial (a and d) to deep (c and f), with a depth difference of 14 µm between images. The SECM images were taken from the region marked by box 4 in Fig. 2 a (scale bar = 100 µm).

Mentions: SECM images from multiple imaging depths were obtained through post-operation image processing of the volumetric data that was acquired in a single helical scan of the probe 11. Fig. 4 shows SECM and en face histologic images obtained from the same respective transverse locations but at different imaging depths. The imaging depth changes from superficial (Fig. 4 a and d) to deep (Fig. 4 c and f) with a depth interval of 14 µm between images. The SECM images were taken from the box 4 in Fig. 2 a. In the SECM images, the papillae (dark circular regions) become bigger as the imaging depth increases from Fig. 4 a to 4 c, and a similar morphologic change is observed in the histologic images. Nuclear density increases with the imaging depth in the SECM images, and a similar trend is shown in the histologic images.


Comprehensive confocal endomicroscopy of the esophagus in vivo.

Kang D, Schlachter SC, Carruth RW, Kim M, Wu T, Tabatabaei N, Vacas-Jacques P, Shishkov M, Woods K, Sauk JS, Leung J, Nishioka NS, Tearney GJ - Endosc Int Open (2014)

 SECM and representative, nearby en face histologic images taken at the same respective transverse locations but at different imaging depths. The imaging depth changes from superficial (a and d) to deep (c and f), with a depth difference of 14 µm between images. The SECM images were taken from the region marked by box 4 in Fig. 2 a (scale bar = 100 µm).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440396&req=5

FI047-4:  SECM and representative, nearby en face histologic images taken at the same respective transverse locations but at different imaging depths. The imaging depth changes from superficial (a and d) to deep (c and f), with a depth difference of 14 µm between images. The SECM images were taken from the region marked by box 4 in Fig. 2 a (scale bar = 100 µm).
Mentions: SECM images from multiple imaging depths were obtained through post-operation image processing of the volumetric data that was acquired in a single helical scan of the probe 11. Fig. 4 shows SECM and en face histologic images obtained from the same respective transverse locations but at different imaging depths. The imaging depth changes from superficial (Fig. 4 a and d) to deep (Fig. 4 c and f) with a depth interval of 14 µm between images. The SECM images were taken from the box 4 in Fig. 2 a. In the SECM images, the papillae (dark circular regions) become bigger as the imaging depth increases from Fig. 4 a to 4 c, and a similar morphologic change is observed in the histologic images. Nuclear density increases with the imaging depth in the SECM images, and a similar trend is shown in the histologic images.

Bottom Line: Very large confocal microscopy images (length = 5 cm; circumference = 2.2 cm) of swine esophagus from three imaging depths, spanning a total area of 33 cm(2), were obtained in about 2 minutes.SECM images enabled the visualization of cellular morphology of the swine esophagus, including stratified squamous cell nuclei, basal cells, and collagen within the lamina propria.The results from this study suggest that the SECM technology can rapidly provide large, contiguous confocal microscopy images of the esophagus in vivo.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Massachusetts General Hospital - Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, MA.

ABSTRACT

Background and study aims: Biopsy sampling error can be a problem for the diagnosis of certain gastrointestinal tract diseases. Spectrally-encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a high-speed reflectance confocal microscopy technology that has the potential to overcome sampling error by imaging large regions of gastrointestinal tract tissues. The aim of this study was to test a recently developed SECM endoscopic probe for comprehensively imaging large segments of the esophagus at the microscopic level in vivo.

Methods: Topical acetic acid was endoscopically applied to the esophagus of a normal living swine. The 7 mm diameter SECM endoscopic probe was transorally introduced into the esophagus over a wire. Optics within the SECM probe were helically scanned over a 5 cm length of the esophagus. Confocal microscopy data was displayed and stored in real time.

Results: Very large confocal microscopy images (length = 5 cm; circumference = 2.2 cm) of swine esophagus from three imaging depths, spanning a total area of 33 cm(2), were obtained in about 2 minutes. SECM images enabled the visualization of cellular morphology of the swine esophagus, including stratified squamous cell nuclei, basal cells, and collagen within the lamina propria.

Conclusions: The results from this study suggest that the SECM technology can rapidly provide large, contiguous confocal microscopy images of the esophagus in vivo. When applied to human subjects, the unique comprehensive, microscopic imaging capabilities of this technology may be utilized for improving the screening and surveillance of various esophageal diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus