Limits...
Anti-microbial Use in Animals: How to Assess the Trade-offs.

Rushton J - Zoonoses Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The possible benefits from the use of antimicrobials need to be balanced against their cost and the increased risk of emergence of resistance due to their use in animals.In addition, research is needed on pricing antimicrobials used in animals to ensure that prices reflect production and marketing costs, the fixed costs of anti-microbial development and the externalities of resistance emergence.Overall, much work is needed to provide greater guidance to policy, and such work should be informed by rigorous data collection and analysis systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Veterinary Epidemiology Economics and Public Health Group, Production and Population Health Department, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, UK.

No MeSH data available.


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Elements required for building a sound economic assessment of One Health and welfare problems.
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fig06: Elements required for building a sound economic assessment of One Health and welfare problems.

Mentions: On the costs side, more attention is required on the large fixed costs required for the development of new antimicrobials and in the need for pricing mechanisms that reflect the need to cover these costs and manage resistance (Vågsholm and Höjgård, 2010). There must be clear information on the capacity of the private sector to manage fixed costs, and this is particularly relevant in situations where livestock sectors are becoming integrated with a small number of large companies. Economics need to be incorporated in epidemiological models, as well as in the monitoring and evaluation of animal health projects and programs. The state's role must be better defined with regard to coordination, legislation and investment in research and information provision. One must also understand that cost-benefit analysis only provides an estimate of economic profitability. Overall, good policy dialogue needs to build on data from different areas of the economy, as well as analysis that incorporates biological, technical and economic disciplines. Figure6 presents a summary of this approach applied to a One health and welfare perspective. This framework includes the use of antimicrobials and the emergence of resistance.


Anti-microbial Use in Animals: How to Assess the Trade-offs.

Rushton J - Zoonoses Public Health (2015)

Elements required for building a sound economic assessment of One Health and welfare problems.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440385&req=5

fig06: Elements required for building a sound economic assessment of One Health and welfare problems.
Mentions: On the costs side, more attention is required on the large fixed costs required for the development of new antimicrobials and in the need for pricing mechanisms that reflect the need to cover these costs and manage resistance (Vågsholm and Höjgård, 2010). There must be clear information on the capacity of the private sector to manage fixed costs, and this is particularly relevant in situations where livestock sectors are becoming integrated with a small number of large companies. Economics need to be incorporated in epidemiological models, as well as in the monitoring and evaluation of animal health projects and programs. The state's role must be better defined with regard to coordination, legislation and investment in research and information provision. One must also understand that cost-benefit analysis only provides an estimate of economic profitability. Overall, good policy dialogue needs to build on data from different areas of the economy, as well as analysis that incorporates biological, technical and economic disciplines. Figure6 presents a summary of this approach applied to a One health and welfare perspective. This framework includes the use of antimicrobials and the emergence of resistance.

Bottom Line: The possible benefits from the use of antimicrobials need to be balanced against their cost and the increased risk of emergence of resistance due to their use in animals.In addition, research is needed on pricing antimicrobials used in animals to ensure that prices reflect production and marketing costs, the fixed costs of anti-microbial development and the externalities of resistance emergence.Overall, much work is needed to provide greater guidance to policy, and such work should be informed by rigorous data collection and analysis systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Veterinary Epidemiology Economics and Public Health Group, Production and Population Health Department, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus