Limits...
Anti-microbial Use in Animals: How to Assess the Trade-offs.

Rushton J - Zoonoses Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The possible benefits from the use of antimicrobials need to be balanced against their cost and the increased risk of emergence of resistance due to their use in animals.In addition, research is needed on pricing antimicrobials used in animals to ensure that prices reflect production and marketing costs, the fixed costs of anti-microbial development and the externalities of resistance emergence.Overall, much work is needed to provide greater guidance to policy, and such work should be informed by rigorous data collection and analysis systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Veterinary Epidemiology Economics and Public Health Group, Production and Population Health Department, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cost-benefit model for livestock disease control with fixed costs (adapted fromTisdell, 2009)
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fig04: Cost-benefit model for livestock disease control with fixed costs (adapted fromTisdell, 2009)

Mentions: These larger fixed costs are borne across society and require a modification of the frameworks proposed by McInerney that largely focuses on smaller, variable costs. Tisdell (2009) proposed that countries that do not invest in fixed cost elements of their animal health systems would find it difficult to incorporate and succeed with individual disease management campaigns. The development of antimicrobials and the process to monitor anti-microbial use, residues in animals, food and the environment and the changes in anti-microbial resistance requires significant societal investment that is beyond the capacity of many countries. Tisdell (2009) developed a theoretical framework around his arguments (see Fig.4).


Anti-microbial Use in Animals: How to Assess the Trade-offs.

Rushton J - Zoonoses Public Health (2015)

Cost-benefit model for livestock disease control with fixed costs (adapted fromTisdell, 2009)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440385&req=5

fig04: Cost-benefit model for livestock disease control with fixed costs (adapted fromTisdell, 2009)
Mentions: These larger fixed costs are borne across society and require a modification of the frameworks proposed by McInerney that largely focuses on smaller, variable costs. Tisdell (2009) proposed that countries that do not invest in fixed cost elements of their animal health systems would find it difficult to incorporate and succeed with individual disease management campaigns. The development of antimicrobials and the process to monitor anti-microbial use, residues in animals, food and the environment and the changes in anti-microbial resistance requires significant societal investment that is beyond the capacity of many countries. Tisdell (2009) developed a theoretical framework around his arguments (see Fig.4).

Bottom Line: The possible benefits from the use of antimicrobials need to be balanced against their cost and the increased risk of emergence of resistance due to their use in animals.In addition, research is needed on pricing antimicrobials used in animals to ensure that prices reflect production and marketing costs, the fixed costs of anti-microbial development and the externalities of resistance emergence.Overall, much work is needed to provide greater guidance to policy, and such work should be informed by rigorous data collection and analysis systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Veterinary Epidemiology Economics and Public Health Group, Production and Population Health Department, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus