Limits...
Anti-microbial Use in Animals: How to Assess the Trade-offs.

Rushton J - Zoonoses Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The possible benefits from the use of antimicrobials need to be balanced against their cost and the increased risk of emergence of resistance due to their use in animals.In addition, research is needed on pricing antimicrobials used in animals to ensure that prices reflect production and marketing costs, the fixed costs of anti-microbial development and the externalities of resistance emergence.Overall, much work is needed to provide greater guidance to policy, and such work should be informed by rigorous data collection and analysis systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Veterinary Epidemiology Economics and Public Health Group, Production and Population Health Department, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Global livestock units by species (FAO, 2014 data author analysis)
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fig01: Global livestock units by species (FAO, 2014 data author analysis)

Mentions: Animals are a fundamental aspect of societies around the world, and they feed people, provide pleasure and company, act as a store of wealth and, in many places, provide power to till land and to transport goods and people. In general, ‘human lives are enhanced by the use of animals’ (Norwood and Lusk, 2011). The sheer number of animals that humans have domesticated, with 7 billion people having 2.65 billion livestock units, underscores this importance.1 A majority of these domesticated animals are cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and poultry – livestock that are kept for food production, transport and draught power and as a form of investment (see Fig.1)2.


Anti-microbial Use in Animals: How to Assess the Trade-offs.

Rushton J - Zoonoses Public Health (2015)

Global livestock units by species (FAO, 2014 data author analysis)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440385&req=5

fig01: Global livestock units by species (FAO, 2014 data author analysis)
Mentions: Animals are a fundamental aspect of societies around the world, and they feed people, provide pleasure and company, act as a store of wealth and, in many places, provide power to till land and to transport goods and people. In general, ‘human lives are enhanced by the use of animals’ (Norwood and Lusk, 2011). The sheer number of animals that humans have domesticated, with 7 billion people having 2.65 billion livestock units, underscores this importance.1 A majority of these domesticated animals are cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and poultry – livestock that are kept for food production, transport and draught power and as a form of investment (see Fig.1)2.

Bottom Line: The possible benefits from the use of antimicrobials need to be balanced against their cost and the increased risk of emergence of resistance due to their use in animals.In addition, research is needed on pricing antimicrobials used in animals to ensure that prices reflect production and marketing costs, the fixed costs of anti-microbial development and the externalities of resistance emergence.Overall, much work is needed to provide greater guidance to policy, and such work should be informed by rigorous data collection and analysis systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Veterinary Epidemiology Economics and Public Health Group, Production and Population Health Department, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus