Limits...
Origin, divergence, and phylogeny of asexual Epichloë endophyte in Elymus species from western China.

Song H, Nan Z - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In addition, our results revealed that asexual E. bromicola isolates that are symbionts in a western Chinese Elymus species and sexual Epichloë species that are symbionts in a North American Elymus species have a different origin.Further analysis found that Epichloë species likely originated in Eurasia.In addition, the results support the hypothesis that migratory birds or humans might have aided the dispersal of these fungal endophytes to other continents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystems, Lanzhou, 730020, P. R. China; College of Pastoral Agriculture Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730020, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Asexual Epichloë species are likely derived directly from sexual Epichloë species that then lost their capacity for sexual reproduction or lost sexual reproduction because of interspecific hybridization between distinct lineages of sexual Epichloë and/or asexual Epichloë species. In this study we isolated asexual Epichloë endophytes from Elymus species in western China and sequenced intron-rich regions in the genes encoding β-tubulin (tubB) and translation elongation factor 1-α (tefA). Our results showed that there are no gene copies of tubB and tefA in any of the isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that sequences in this study formed a single clade with asexual Epichloë bromicola from Hordeum brevisubulatum, which implies asexual Epichloë endophytes that are symbionts in a western Chinese Elymus species likely share a common ancestor with asexual E. bromicola from European H. brevisubulatum. In addition, our results revealed that asexual E. bromicola isolates that are symbionts in a western Chinese Elymus species and sexual Epichloë species that are symbionts in a North American Elymus species have a different origin. Further analysis found that Epichloë species likely originated in Eurasia. In addition, the results support the hypothesis that migratory birds or humans might have aided the dispersal of these fungal endophytes to other continents.

No MeSH data available.


Median-joining (MJ) networks of tefA haplotypes from Epichloë species.Each circle represents a single haplotype and the circle size is proportional to the number of isolates with that haplotype. Median vectors (mv) indicate missing intermediates of unsampled nodes inferred by the MJ network analysis and the number along the branch shows the number of mutations separating nodes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4430518&req=5

pone.0127096.g004: Median-joining (MJ) networks of tefA haplotypes from Epichloë species.Each circle represents a single haplotype and the circle size is proportional to the number of isolates with that haplotype. Median vectors (mv) indicate missing intermediates of unsampled nodes inferred by the MJ network analysis and the number along the branch shows the number of mutations separating nodes.

Mentions: The tefA MJ network had a haplotype diversity of 0.9770. Fifteen asexual Epichloë tefA sequences from western Chinese Elymus species contained seven haplotypes, Htef 35, 40, 60, 61, 62, 63 and 64. Htef 61, 62, 63 and 64 only contained one tefA sequence each, while Htef 35, 40 and 60 contained three, six and five tefA sequences, respectively (Fig 4 and S1 Table). In Htef 35, there were three asexual Epichloë endophytes, including two asexual Epichloë endophytes isolated from western Chinese Elymus species and one asexual E. bromicola isolated from European H. brevisubulatum. Htef 40 contained three asexual Epichloë endophytes from western Chinese Elymus species and three asexual E. sinica from Asian Roegneria spp.. In addition, Htef 60 contained five asexual Epichloë endophytes from western Chinese Elymus species. The sexual E. bromicola from El. repens (Htef 59) is closely related to the asexual Epichloë species from western China (Fig 4).


Origin, divergence, and phylogeny of asexual Epichloë endophyte in Elymus species from western China.

Song H, Nan Z - PLoS ONE (2015)

Median-joining (MJ) networks of tefA haplotypes from Epichloë species.Each circle represents a single haplotype and the circle size is proportional to the number of isolates with that haplotype. Median vectors (mv) indicate missing intermediates of unsampled nodes inferred by the MJ network analysis and the number along the branch shows the number of mutations separating nodes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4430518&req=5

pone.0127096.g004: Median-joining (MJ) networks of tefA haplotypes from Epichloë species.Each circle represents a single haplotype and the circle size is proportional to the number of isolates with that haplotype. Median vectors (mv) indicate missing intermediates of unsampled nodes inferred by the MJ network analysis and the number along the branch shows the number of mutations separating nodes.
Mentions: The tefA MJ network had a haplotype diversity of 0.9770. Fifteen asexual Epichloë tefA sequences from western Chinese Elymus species contained seven haplotypes, Htef 35, 40, 60, 61, 62, 63 and 64. Htef 61, 62, 63 and 64 only contained one tefA sequence each, while Htef 35, 40 and 60 contained three, six and five tefA sequences, respectively (Fig 4 and S1 Table). In Htef 35, there were three asexual Epichloë endophytes, including two asexual Epichloë endophytes isolated from western Chinese Elymus species and one asexual E. bromicola isolated from European H. brevisubulatum. Htef 40 contained three asexual Epichloë endophytes from western Chinese Elymus species and three asexual E. sinica from Asian Roegneria spp.. In addition, Htef 60 contained five asexual Epichloë endophytes from western Chinese Elymus species. The sexual E. bromicola from El. repens (Htef 59) is closely related to the asexual Epichloë species from western China (Fig 4).

Bottom Line: In addition, our results revealed that asexual E. bromicola isolates that are symbionts in a western Chinese Elymus species and sexual Epichloë species that are symbionts in a North American Elymus species have a different origin.Further analysis found that Epichloë species likely originated in Eurasia.In addition, the results support the hypothesis that migratory birds or humans might have aided the dispersal of these fungal endophytes to other continents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystems, Lanzhou, 730020, P. R. China; College of Pastoral Agriculture Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730020, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Asexual Epichloë species are likely derived directly from sexual Epichloë species that then lost their capacity for sexual reproduction or lost sexual reproduction because of interspecific hybridization between distinct lineages of sexual Epichloë and/or asexual Epichloë species. In this study we isolated asexual Epichloë endophytes from Elymus species in western China and sequenced intron-rich regions in the genes encoding β-tubulin (tubB) and translation elongation factor 1-α (tefA). Our results showed that there are no gene copies of tubB and tefA in any of the isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that sequences in this study formed a single clade with asexual Epichloë bromicola from Hordeum brevisubulatum, which implies asexual Epichloë endophytes that are symbionts in a western Chinese Elymus species likely share a common ancestor with asexual E. bromicola from European H. brevisubulatum. In addition, our results revealed that asexual E. bromicola isolates that are symbionts in a western Chinese Elymus species and sexual Epichloë species that are symbionts in a North American Elymus species have a different origin. Further analysis found that Epichloë species likely originated in Eurasia. In addition, the results support the hypothesis that migratory birds or humans might have aided the dispersal of these fungal endophytes to other continents.

No MeSH data available.