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Game intelligence in team sports.

Lennartsson J, Lidström N, Lindberg C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A fundamental idea is the concept of potential; the probability of the offense scoring the next goal minus the probability that the next goal is made by the defense.We develop categorical as well as continuous models, and obtain optimal strategies for both offense and defense.A main result is that the optimal defensive strategy is to minimize the maximum potential of all offensive strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Chalmers University of Technology and Gothenburg University, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
We set up a game theoretic framework to analyze a wide range of situations from team sports. A fundamental idea is the concept of potential; the probability of the offense scoring the next goal minus the probability that the next goal is made by the defense. We develop categorical as well as continuous models, and obtain optimal strategies for both offense and defense. A main result is that the optimal defensive strategy is to minimize the maximum potential of all offensive strategies.

No MeSH data available.


The extensive game tree in the example Ice hockey; two against one.
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pone.0125453.g005: The extensive game tree in the example Ice hockey; two against one.

Mentions: In ice hockey, the game situation where two team A players A1 and A2 face a single team B defender B1 occurs often. We assume that A1 has initial puck possession. Due to the blue line offside, the situation starts as a one against one situation where B1 positions herself with the move (p0, p1) to prevent the attack. Next, A1 can choose either of the following four moves: to dribble (p1, p2); to shoot (p1, p3); to avoid B1, (p1, p4); and to pass A2, (p1, p5). If A1 decides to dribble then she is either successful, (p2, p6), or looses possession, (p2, p7). Further, if A1 shoots, she ends up in p3, an ending position. If A1 makes the move to avoid B1, (p1, p4), then B1 re-positions with the move (p4, p8). The subgame situation is ended by a shot from A1, (p8, p9), or with a pass to A2 for her to shoot a one timer, (p8, p10). Finally, if A1 passes A2, (p1, p5), we are in a new two against one situation, but where A2 has puck possession. The corresponding game is illustrated in Fig 5, where a description of the positions are given in Table 3.


Game intelligence in team sports.

Lennartsson J, Lidström N, Lindberg C - PLoS ONE (2015)

The extensive game tree in the example Ice hockey; two against one.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4430496&req=5

pone.0125453.g005: The extensive game tree in the example Ice hockey; two against one.
Mentions: In ice hockey, the game situation where two team A players A1 and A2 face a single team B defender B1 occurs often. We assume that A1 has initial puck possession. Due to the blue line offside, the situation starts as a one against one situation where B1 positions herself with the move (p0, p1) to prevent the attack. Next, A1 can choose either of the following four moves: to dribble (p1, p2); to shoot (p1, p3); to avoid B1, (p1, p4); and to pass A2, (p1, p5). If A1 decides to dribble then she is either successful, (p2, p6), or looses possession, (p2, p7). Further, if A1 shoots, she ends up in p3, an ending position. If A1 makes the move to avoid B1, (p1, p4), then B1 re-positions with the move (p4, p8). The subgame situation is ended by a shot from A1, (p8, p9), or with a pass to A2 for her to shoot a one timer, (p8, p10). Finally, if A1 passes A2, (p1, p5), we are in a new two against one situation, but where A2 has puck possession. The corresponding game is illustrated in Fig 5, where a description of the positions are given in Table 3.

Bottom Line: A fundamental idea is the concept of potential; the probability of the offense scoring the next goal minus the probability that the next goal is made by the defense.We develop categorical as well as continuous models, and obtain optimal strategies for both offense and defense.A main result is that the optimal defensive strategy is to minimize the maximum potential of all offensive strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Chalmers University of Technology and Gothenburg University, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
We set up a game theoretic framework to analyze a wide range of situations from team sports. A fundamental idea is the concept of potential; the probability of the offense scoring the next goal minus the probability that the next goal is made by the defense. We develop categorical as well as continuous models, and obtain optimal strategies for both offense and defense. A main result is that the optimal defensive strategy is to minimize the maximum potential of all offensive strategies.

No MeSH data available.