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Evolutionary Migration of the Disjunct Salt Cress Eutrema salsugineum (= Thellungiella salsuginea, Brassicaceae) between Asia and North America.

Wang XJ, Shi DC, Wang XY, Wang J, Sun YS, Liu JQ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: All markers suggested the high genetic poverty of this species and the limited number of genetic variations recovered was congruently partitioned between central Asia, northern China and North America.The fast demographic expansions should have occurred in northern China in a more recent past.Our study highlights the importance of using ABC analyses and nuclear population genetic data to trace evolutionary migrations of the disjunct distributions of the plants in the recent past.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MOE Key Laboratory for Bio-resources and Eco-environment, College of Life Science, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

ABSTRACT
Eutrema salsugineum (= Thellungiella salsuginea Brassicaceae), a species growing in highly saline habitats, is a good model for use in salt-stress research. However, its evolutionary migrations and genetic variations within and between disjunct regions from central Asia to northern China and North America remain largely unknown. We examined genetic variations and phylogeographic patterns of this species by sequencing ITS, 9 chloroplast (cp) DNA fragments (4379 bp) and 10 unlinked nuclear loci (6510 bp) of 24 populations across its distributional range. All markers suggested the high genetic poverty of this species and the limited number of genetic variations recovered was congruently partitioned between central Asia, northern China and North America. Further modelling of nuclear population-genetic data based on approximate bayesian computation (ABC) analyses indicated that the long-distance dispersals after the recent origin of E. salsugineum may have occurred from central Asia to the other two regions respectively within 20000 years. The fast demographic expansions should have occurred in northern China in a more recent past. Our study highlights the importance of using ABC analyses and nuclear population genetic data to trace evolutionary migrations of the disjunct distributions of the plants in the recent past.

No MeSH data available.


Results of the mismatch distribution analyses for four groups.A. All examined populations. B. Populations from northern China and Buriatia. C. Seven populations excluding those occurring in northern China and Buriatia. D. Five populations from North America and Russia (equaling to Group C). Dotted lines refer to the distributions expected for an expanding population, while the continuous lines represent the observed distributions of pairwise differences among samples.
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pone.0124010.g003: Results of the mismatch distribution analyses for four groups.A. All examined populations. B. Populations from northern China and Buriatia. C. Seven populations excluding those occurring in northern China and Buriatia. D. Five populations from North America and Russia (equaling to Group C). Dotted lines refer to the distributions expected for an expanding population, while the continuous lines represent the observed distributions of pairwise differences among samples.

Mentions: The mismatch analyses based on nuclear data for 17 populations for Group B from northern China plus Buriatia suggested a distinct population expansion (Fig 3B). Further analyses of the variance (SSD) and raggedness index (RAD) suggested that the curves did not differ significantly from those of distributions expected based on a model of sudden population expansions (Table 2). In addition, the growth rate parameter ā€˜gā€™, derived from LAMARC tests [49], obviously supported the population expansion of this group (g = 351.89) (Table 2). However, we failed to detect expansion for the other two groups of populations possibly due to the fewer recovered mutations.


Evolutionary Migration of the Disjunct Salt Cress Eutrema salsugineum (= Thellungiella salsuginea, Brassicaceae) between Asia and North America.

Wang XJ, Shi DC, Wang XY, Wang J, Sun YS, Liu JQ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Results of the mismatch distribution analyses for four groups.A. All examined populations. B. Populations from northern China and Buriatia. C. Seven populations excluding those occurring in northern China and Buriatia. D. Five populations from North America and Russia (equaling to Group C). Dotted lines refer to the distributions expected for an expanding population, while the continuous lines represent the observed distributions of pairwise differences among samples.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4430283&req=5

pone.0124010.g003: Results of the mismatch distribution analyses for four groups.A. All examined populations. B. Populations from northern China and Buriatia. C. Seven populations excluding those occurring in northern China and Buriatia. D. Five populations from North America and Russia (equaling to Group C). Dotted lines refer to the distributions expected for an expanding population, while the continuous lines represent the observed distributions of pairwise differences among samples.
Mentions: The mismatch analyses based on nuclear data for 17 populations for Group B from northern China plus Buriatia suggested a distinct population expansion (Fig 3B). Further analyses of the variance (SSD) and raggedness index (RAD) suggested that the curves did not differ significantly from those of distributions expected based on a model of sudden population expansions (Table 2). In addition, the growth rate parameter ā€˜gā€™, derived from LAMARC tests [49], obviously supported the population expansion of this group (g = 351.89) (Table 2). However, we failed to detect expansion for the other two groups of populations possibly due to the fewer recovered mutations.

Bottom Line: All markers suggested the high genetic poverty of this species and the limited number of genetic variations recovered was congruently partitioned between central Asia, northern China and North America.The fast demographic expansions should have occurred in northern China in a more recent past.Our study highlights the importance of using ABC analyses and nuclear population genetic data to trace evolutionary migrations of the disjunct distributions of the plants in the recent past.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MOE Key Laboratory for Bio-resources and Eco-environment, College of Life Science, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

ABSTRACT
Eutrema salsugineum (= Thellungiella salsuginea Brassicaceae), a species growing in highly saline habitats, is a good model for use in salt-stress research. However, its evolutionary migrations and genetic variations within and between disjunct regions from central Asia to northern China and North America remain largely unknown. We examined genetic variations and phylogeographic patterns of this species by sequencing ITS, 9 chloroplast (cp) DNA fragments (4379 bp) and 10 unlinked nuclear loci (6510 bp) of 24 populations across its distributional range. All markers suggested the high genetic poverty of this species and the limited number of genetic variations recovered was congruently partitioned between central Asia, northern China and North America. Further modelling of nuclear population-genetic data based on approximate bayesian computation (ABC) analyses indicated that the long-distance dispersals after the recent origin of E. salsugineum may have occurred from central Asia to the other two regions respectively within 20000 years. The fast demographic expansions should have occurred in northern China in a more recent past. Our study highlights the importance of using ABC analyses and nuclear population genetic data to trace evolutionary migrations of the disjunct distributions of the plants in the recent past.

No MeSH data available.