Limits...
Osteological, biomolecular and geochemical examination of an early anglo-saxon case of lepromatous leprosy.

Inskip SA, Taylor GM, Zakrzewski SR, Mays SA, Pike AW, Llewellyn G, Williams CM, Lee OY, Wu HH, Minnikin DE, Besra GS, Stewart GR - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The incomplete remains are those of a young male, aged around 21-35 years at death.Genotyping showed the strain belonged to the 3I lineage, but the Great Chesterford isolate appeared to be ancestral to 3I strains found in later medieval cases in southern Britain and also continental Europe.Importantly, Strontium and Oxygen isotope analysis suggest that the individual is likely to have originated from outside Britain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculteit Archaeologie, Universiteit Leiden, 2311 BE, Leiden, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
We have examined a 5th to 6th century inhumation from Great Chesterford, Essex, UK. The incomplete remains are those of a young male, aged around 21-35 years at death. The remains show osteological evidence of lepromatous leprosy (LL) and this was confirmed by lipid biomarker analysis and ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis, which provided evidence for both multi-copy and single copy loci from the Mycobacterium leprae genome. Genotyping showed the strain belonged to the 3I lineage, but the Great Chesterford isolate appeared to be ancestral to 3I strains found in later medieval cases in southern Britain and also continental Europe. While a number of contemporaneous cases exist, at present, this case of leprosy is the earliest radiocarbon dated case in Britain confirmed by both aDNA and lipid biomarkers. Importantly, Strontium and Oxygen isotope analysis suggest that the individual is likely to have originated from outside Britain. This potentially sheds light on the origins of the strain in Britain and its subsequent spread to other parts of the world, including the Americas where the 3I lineage of M. leprae is still found in some southern states of America.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Left tibia of GC96 showing evidence of inflammatory pitting and presence of both woven and remodelled lamellar bone on the subperiosteal shaft.
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pone.0124282.g002: Left tibia of GC96 showing evidence of inflammatory pitting and presence of both woven and remodelled lamellar bone on the subperiosteal shaft.

Mentions: Both tibiae and fibulae had changes extending from the proximal midshaft onto all of the bone surfaces inferior to it. All four bones had new bone growth on the periosteal surfaces. On both the left and right sides, remodelled lamellar bone was evident, which was orientated longitudinally and took on a nodular appearance where the new bone was thickest, particularly along the interosseous borders. The nodular appearance suggests multiple episodes of new bone apposition with healing. On the left tibia, woven bone, which was porous and disorganised, was observed on the medial malleolus and on the medial and anterior aspect of the distal diaphysis (Fig 2). The nature of the lesions suggests an active process at the time of death. In addition to the new bone growth, increased bone porosity is seen in the distal diaphysis and epiphysis of the left tibia.


Osteological, biomolecular and geochemical examination of an early anglo-saxon case of lepromatous leprosy.

Inskip SA, Taylor GM, Zakrzewski SR, Mays SA, Pike AW, Llewellyn G, Williams CM, Lee OY, Wu HH, Minnikin DE, Besra GS, Stewart GR - PLoS ONE (2015)

Left tibia of GC96 showing evidence of inflammatory pitting and presence of both woven and remodelled lamellar bone on the subperiosteal shaft.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4430215&req=5

pone.0124282.g002: Left tibia of GC96 showing evidence of inflammatory pitting and presence of both woven and remodelled lamellar bone on the subperiosteal shaft.
Mentions: Both tibiae and fibulae had changes extending from the proximal midshaft onto all of the bone surfaces inferior to it. All four bones had new bone growth on the periosteal surfaces. On both the left and right sides, remodelled lamellar bone was evident, which was orientated longitudinally and took on a nodular appearance where the new bone was thickest, particularly along the interosseous borders. The nodular appearance suggests multiple episodes of new bone apposition with healing. On the left tibia, woven bone, which was porous and disorganised, was observed on the medial malleolus and on the medial and anterior aspect of the distal diaphysis (Fig 2). The nature of the lesions suggests an active process at the time of death. In addition to the new bone growth, increased bone porosity is seen in the distal diaphysis and epiphysis of the left tibia.

Bottom Line: The incomplete remains are those of a young male, aged around 21-35 years at death.Genotyping showed the strain belonged to the 3I lineage, but the Great Chesterford isolate appeared to be ancestral to 3I strains found in later medieval cases in southern Britain and also continental Europe.Importantly, Strontium and Oxygen isotope analysis suggest that the individual is likely to have originated from outside Britain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculteit Archaeologie, Universiteit Leiden, 2311 BE, Leiden, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
We have examined a 5th to 6th century inhumation from Great Chesterford, Essex, UK. The incomplete remains are those of a young male, aged around 21-35 years at death. The remains show osteological evidence of lepromatous leprosy (LL) and this was confirmed by lipid biomarker analysis and ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis, which provided evidence for both multi-copy and single copy loci from the Mycobacterium leprae genome. Genotyping showed the strain belonged to the 3I lineage, but the Great Chesterford isolate appeared to be ancestral to 3I strains found in later medieval cases in southern Britain and also continental Europe. While a number of contemporaneous cases exist, at present, this case of leprosy is the earliest radiocarbon dated case in Britain confirmed by both aDNA and lipid biomarkers. Importantly, Strontium and Oxygen isotope analysis suggest that the individual is likely to have originated from outside Britain. This potentially sheds light on the origins of the strain in Britain and its subsequent spread to other parts of the world, including the Americas where the 3I lineage of M. leprae is still found in some southern states of America.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus