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Report of a case: Retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma with rapid progression.

Kamiyama H, Shimazu A, Makino Y, Ichikawa R, Hobo T, Arima S, Nohara S, Sugiyama Y, Okumura M, Takei M, Miura H, Namekata K, Tsumura H, Okada M, Takase M, Matsumoto F - Int J Surg Case Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Eventually, the patient died of the disease 15 months after surgery.Complete excision without rupture is essential.Retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma is a rare tumor, and it is urgently necessary to elucidate the etiology of an effective therapy for the disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Koshigaya Municipal Hospital, Higashikoshigaya 10-47-1, Koshigayashi, Saitama 343-8577, Japan. Electronic address: hkamiya@juntendo.ac.jp.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Abdominal CT, taken 15 months after the surgery, showed massive osteoclastic metastasis at L4. (B) In addition to progression of osteoclastic bone metastasis, massive local recurrence of retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma had developed.
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fig0025: (A) Abdominal CT, taken 15 months after the surgery, showed massive osteoclastic metastasis at L4. (B) In addition to progression of osteoclastic bone metastasis, massive local recurrence of retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma had developed.

Mentions: Eight months later, the patient complained of back pain, and CT revealed osteoclastic lumbar bone metastasis at L4 (Fig. 4). Serum CA19-9 was elevated at 160U/ml. 40 Gy of irradiation to the lumbar bone was performed immediately, and chemotherapy with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine, and docetaxel (oral S-1 of 80 mg/m2 for the first two weeks in 3 weeks and injection of docetaxel of 60 mg/m2 on day 1 in 3 weeks) were administered. However, the disease never responded to chemotherapy, and rapidly spread to the retroperitoneum (Fig. 5). Eventually, the patient died of the disease 15 months after surgery.


Report of a case: Retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma with rapid progression.

Kamiyama H, Shimazu A, Makino Y, Ichikawa R, Hobo T, Arima S, Nohara S, Sugiyama Y, Okumura M, Takei M, Miura H, Namekata K, Tsumura H, Okada M, Takase M, Matsumoto F - Int J Surg Case Rep (2015)

(A) Abdominal CT, taken 15 months after the surgery, showed massive osteoclastic metastasis at L4. (B) In addition to progression of osteoclastic bone metastasis, massive local recurrence of retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma had developed.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4430186&req=5

fig0025: (A) Abdominal CT, taken 15 months after the surgery, showed massive osteoclastic metastasis at L4. (B) In addition to progression of osteoclastic bone metastasis, massive local recurrence of retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma had developed.
Mentions: Eight months later, the patient complained of back pain, and CT revealed osteoclastic lumbar bone metastasis at L4 (Fig. 4). Serum CA19-9 was elevated at 160U/ml. 40 Gy of irradiation to the lumbar bone was performed immediately, and chemotherapy with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine, and docetaxel (oral S-1 of 80 mg/m2 for the first two weeks in 3 weeks and injection of docetaxel of 60 mg/m2 on day 1 in 3 weeks) were administered. However, the disease never responded to chemotherapy, and rapidly spread to the retroperitoneum (Fig. 5). Eventually, the patient died of the disease 15 months after surgery.

Bottom Line: Eventually, the patient died of the disease 15 months after surgery.Complete excision without rupture is essential.Retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma is a rare tumor, and it is urgently necessary to elucidate the etiology of an effective therapy for the disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Koshigaya Municipal Hospital, Higashikoshigaya 10-47-1, Koshigayashi, Saitama 343-8577, Japan. Electronic address: hkamiya@juntendo.ac.jp.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus