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Giant fibrokeratoma, a rare soft tissue tumor presenting like an accessory digit, a case report and review of literature.

Ali M, Mbah CA, Alwadiya A, Nur MM, Sunderamoorthy D - Int J Surg Case Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The growth was completely excised, and the base was allowed to heal by secondary intention.The skin eventually healed, and the patient had a good outcome.Additionally, we emphasise the importance of ruling out other causes of abnormal growths and considering fibrokeratoma during differential diagnoses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Junior Clinical Fellow, Trauma and Orthopaedics, Royal Derby Hospital, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Mohammedkhider84@hotmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

After the excision.
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fig0020: After the excision.

Mentions: Under general anaesthesia, an incision was made around the base of the tumour. The incision was extended to the underlying soft tissues, which were dissected. No major blood vessels were observed, and the tumour was not attached to bone. The tumour appeared to have arisen from the superficial soft tissues of the left hallux. The growth was completely excised, and the base was allowed to heal by secondary intention. The skin eventually healed, and the patient had a good outcome (Fig. 4).


Giant fibrokeratoma, a rare soft tissue tumor presenting like an accessory digit, a case report and review of literature.

Ali M, Mbah CA, Alwadiya A, Nur MM, Sunderamoorthy D - Int J Surg Case Rep (2015)

After the excision.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4430176&req=5

fig0020: After the excision.
Mentions: Under general anaesthesia, an incision was made around the base of the tumour. The incision was extended to the underlying soft tissues, which were dissected. No major blood vessels were observed, and the tumour was not attached to bone. The tumour appeared to have arisen from the superficial soft tissues of the left hallux. The growth was completely excised, and the base was allowed to heal by secondary intention. The skin eventually healed, and the patient had a good outcome (Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: The growth was completely excised, and the base was allowed to heal by secondary intention.The skin eventually healed, and the patient had a good outcome.Additionally, we emphasise the importance of ruling out other causes of abnormal growths and considering fibrokeratoma during differential diagnoses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Junior Clinical Fellow, Trauma and Orthopaedics, Royal Derby Hospital, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Mohammedkhider84@hotmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus