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Kidney transplantation in a patient with absent right common iliac artery and congenital renal abnormalities.

Tay CM, Siew EP, Ng TK, Vathsala A, Tiong HY - Int J Surg Case Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Congenital atresia of the common and external iliac arteries is a rare vascular anomaly that may be associated with congenital renal or genitourinary malformations.While most cases of congenital iliac artery anomalies are symptomatic with claudication, some remain asymptomatic with normal physical examination findings.There is some evidence in literature suggesting the usefulness of routine pre-operative CT in a selective group of patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, National University Health System, Singapore.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

3D reconstruction of CT showing a missing right common iliac artery and the anomalous branch from the left internal iliac artery crossing the pelvis. A branch arising from the right side of the distal abdominal aorta, superior to the bifurcation, gives off a few pelvic branches before continuing along the pelvic side wall to receive the anomalous branch from the left internal iliac artery just proximal to the femoral canal. This then continues distally into the right lower limb as the right common femoral artery.
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fig0010: 3D reconstruction of CT showing a missing right common iliac artery and the anomalous branch from the left internal iliac artery crossing the pelvis. A branch arising from the right side of the distal abdominal aorta, superior to the bifurcation, gives off a few pelvic branches before continuing along the pelvic side wall to receive the anomalous branch from the left internal iliac artery just proximal to the femoral canal. This then continues distally into the right lower limb as the right common femoral artery.

Mentions: In view of his multiple congenital anomalies and previous surgeries, computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis was done for pre-operative planning. The CT revealed aberrant iliac vasculature – the right common and external iliac arteries are not visualized as the abdominal aorta ends with the left common iliac artery bifurcating into the left internal and external iliac arteries (Fig. 1). A branch arising from the right distal abdominal aorta superior to the bifurcation gives off a lumbar branch before passing posterior to the right psoas muscle into the pelvis. It gives off several pelvic branches before continuing anteriorly along the pelvic side wall to receive a large anomalous branch from the left internal iliac artery, just proximal to the femoral canal. The large anomalous branch, which is the main vascular supply to the right lower limb, demonstrates a convoluted course across the pelvis from left to right. The combined vessel then continued distally as the right common femoral artery (Fig. 2).


Kidney transplantation in a patient with absent right common iliac artery and congenital renal abnormalities.

Tay CM, Siew EP, Ng TK, Vathsala A, Tiong HY - Int J Surg Case Rep (2015)

3D reconstruction of CT showing a missing right common iliac artery and the anomalous branch from the left internal iliac artery crossing the pelvis. A branch arising from the right side of the distal abdominal aorta, superior to the bifurcation, gives off a few pelvic branches before continuing along the pelvic side wall to receive the anomalous branch from the left internal iliac artery just proximal to the femoral canal. This then continues distally into the right lower limb as the right common femoral artery.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-SA
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4430136&req=5

fig0010: 3D reconstruction of CT showing a missing right common iliac artery and the anomalous branch from the left internal iliac artery crossing the pelvis. A branch arising from the right side of the distal abdominal aorta, superior to the bifurcation, gives off a few pelvic branches before continuing along the pelvic side wall to receive the anomalous branch from the left internal iliac artery just proximal to the femoral canal. This then continues distally into the right lower limb as the right common femoral artery.
Mentions: In view of his multiple congenital anomalies and previous surgeries, computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis was done for pre-operative planning. The CT revealed aberrant iliac vasculature – the right common and external iliac arteries are not visualized as the abdominal aorta ends with the left common iliac artery bifurcating into the left internal and external iliac arteries (Fig. 1). A branch arising from the right distal abdominal aorta superior to the bifurcation gives off a lumbar branch before passing posterior to the right psoas muscle into the pelvis. It gives off several pelvic branches before continuing anteriorly along the pelvic side wall to receive a large anomalous branch from the left internal iliac artery, just proximal to the femoral canal. The large anomalous branch, which is the main vascular supply to the right lower limb, demonstrates a convoluted course across the pelvis from left to right. The combined vessel then continued distally as the right common femoral artery (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Congenital atresia of the common and external iliac arteries is a rare vascular anomaly that may be associated with congenital renal or genitourinary malformations.While most cases of congenital iliac artery anomalies are symptomatic with claudication, some remain asymptomatic with normal physical examination findings.There is some evidence in literature suggesting the usefulness of routine pre-operative CT in a selective group of patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, National University Health System, Singapore.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus