Limits...
Bacterial contamination of suction catheter tips during aortic valve replacement surgery: a prospective observational cohort study.

Larsson J, Sutherland S, Söderström Å, Roman-Emanuel C, Jeppsson A, Olofsson EH, Svensson PA - Patient Saf Surg (2015)

Bottom Line: Coagulase-negative staphylococcus was the most commonly detected microorganism.The suction device should be considered as a potential source of bacterial contamination in cardiac surgery.The results suggest that the suction catheter should be replaced before key moments like valve implantation and sternal closure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden ; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: Bacterial mediastinitis is a severe complication after open heart surgery. The infection causes prolonged hospitalization and an increased mortality risk. Observations from orthopaedic surgery showed that the suction catheter used during surgery is commonly contaminated with bacteria. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of suction catheter contamination in cardiac surgery and to study if suction time influences the contamination risk.

Methods: Fifty suction catheter tips were collected during 25 aortic valve replacement operations. The suction tip was exchanged once during the operation (after aortotomy closure). The tips were subjected to bacterial contamination analysis.

Results: In 20 of the 25 investigated cases (80%), bacterial contamination was detected on one or both tips. The tip used during the beginning of the operation showed bacterial contamination in 13/25 cases (52%) and the second tip in 12/25 (48%). In 5/25 cases (20%) both tips were contaminated. There was no association between bacterial contamination and suction time. Coagulase-negative staphylococcus was the most commonly detected microorganism.

Conclusions: The suction device should be considered as a potential source of bacterial contamination in cardiac surgery. The results suggest that the suction catheter should be replaced before key moments like valve implantation and sternal closure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Quantification of bacterial growth on suction catheter tips from the first part (A) and the second part (B) the aortic valve replacement operations. Bacterial contamination was classified into four categories; abundant (>100 CFU), moderate (10–100 CFU), sparse (<10 CFU) or after enrichment.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4430035&req=5

Fig1: Quantification of bacterial growth on suction catheter tips from the first part (A) and the second part (B) the aortic valve replacement operations. Bacterial contamination was classified into four categories; abundant (>100 CFU), moderate (10–100 CFU), sparse (<10 CFU) or after enrichment.

Mentions: Quantification of the contamination of the suction catheters tips are shown in Figure 1. From the first part of the operation, five samples showed sparse bacterial contamination and eight showed bacterial contamination after enrichment (Figure 1A). From the second part of the operation, one sample showed abundant growth, two samples moderate growth, two showed sparse growth and seven samples showed bacterial growth after enrichment (Figure 1B). If samples where the detection was observed only after enrichment were excluded from the analysis, contamination frequencies of the catheter suction tips were 20% for both the first part and the second part of the operations.Figure 1


Bacterial contamination of suction catheter tips during aortic valve replacement surgery: a prospective observational cohort study.

Larsson J, Sutherland S, Söderström Å, Roman-Emanuel C, Jeppsson A, Olofsson EH, Svensson PA - Patient Saf Surg (2015)

Quantification of bacterial growth on suction catheter tips from the first part (A) and the second part (B) the aortic valve replacement operations. Bacterial contamination was classified into four categories; abundant (>100 CFU), moderate (10–100 CFU), sparse (<10 CFU) or after enrichment.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4430035&req=5

Fig1: Quantification of bacterial growth on suction catheter tips from the first part (A) and the second part (B) the aortic valve replacement operations. Bacterial contamination was classified into four categories; abundant (>100 CFU), moderate (10–100 CFU), sparse (<10 CFU) or after enrichment.
Mentions: Quantification of the contamination of the suction catheters tips are shown in Figure 1. From the first part of the operation, five samples showed sparse bacterial contamination and eight showed bacterial contamination after enrichment (Figure 1A). From the second part of the operation, one sample showed abundant growth, two samples moderate growth, two showed sparse growth and seven samples showed bacterial growth after enrichment (Figure 1B). If samples where the detection was observed only after enrichment were excluded from the analysis, contamination frequencies of the catheter suction tips were 20% for both the first part and the second part of the operations.Figure 1

Bottom Line: Coagulase-negative staphylococcus was the most commonly detected microorganism.The suction device should be considered as a potential source of bacterial contamination in cardiac surgery.The results suggest that the suction catheter should be replaced before key moments like valve implantation and sternal closure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden ; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: Bacterial mediastinitis is a severe complication after open heart surgery. The infection causes prolonged hospitalization and an increased mortality risk. Observations from orthopaedic surgery showed that the suction catheter used during surgery is commonly contaminated with bacteria. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of suction catheter contamination in cardiac surgery and to study if suction time influences the contamination risk.

Methods: Fifty suction catheter tips were collected during 25 aortic valve replacement operations. The suction tip was exchanged once during the operation (after aortotomy closure). The tips were subjected to bacterial contamination analysis.

Results: In 20 of the 25 investigated cases (80%), bacterial contamination was detected on one or both tips. The tip used during the beginning of the operation showed bacterial contamination in 13/25 cases (52%) and the second tip in 12/25 (48%). In 5/25 cases (20%) both tips were contaminated. There was no association between bacterial contamination and suction time. Coagulase-negative staphylococcus was the most commonly detected microorganism.

Conclusions: The suction device should be considered as a potential source of bacterial contamination in cardiac surgery. The results suggest that the suction catheter should be replaced before key moments like valve implantation and sternal closure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus