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Use-value and importance of socio-cultural knowledge on Carapa procera trees in the Sudanian zone in Mali.

Dembélé U, Lykke AM, Koné Y, Témé B, Kouyaté AM - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2015)

Bottom Line: This study highlighted the sociocultural importance of Carapa procera.In the light of its multipurpose uses, the promotion and enhancement of Carapa procera can provide significant socio-economic benefits to local people.In this perspective, it is necessary to implement conservation strategies and sustainable management through domestication of the species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut d'Economie Rurale (IER), Rue Mohamed V, BP: 258, Bamako, Mali. udembele@yahoo.fr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Carapa procera is a native oil tree species with multipurpose values traditionally exploited by the local population in Southern Mali. This study focused on the assessment of local knowledge about the use of Carapa procera.

Methods: Semi-structured ethnobotanical questionnaires were conducted among the ethnic groups Senufo, Fulani and Bambara in two localities in the Sudanian zone in Mali. Use values among these ethnic groups and gender were evaluated.

Results: This study showed that Carapa procera is a species with multiple uses and high use values. According to the consensus value for plant parts (CPP), the nuts constituted 57% of exploited plant parts followed by bark and leaves (12%), wood and roots (7%), mistletoes (4%) and gum (1%). The use diversity (UD) values of Carapa procera showed a high proportion of cosmetic (UD = 0.49) and therapeutic (UD = 0.36) uses. The UD for therapeutic uses was higher for ethnic groups in Ziékorodougou than in Niankorobougou. In contrast, the UD for cosmetic uses was higher for ethnic groups in Niankorobougou than in Ziékorodougou. Comparative analysis between ethnic groups revealed that the highest UD for cosmetic uses (0.63) was observed in the Bambara ethnic group, whereas the highest UD for therapeutic uses (0.39) was obtained in the Senufo ethnic group. The UD showed that cosmetic uses were higher for women than for men in both locations. Men in Ziékorodougou had the highest level of knowledge regarding plant parts used, forms of use and the specific reasons for using Carapa procera.

Conclusion: This study highlighted the sociocultural importance of Carapa procera. In the light of its multipurpose uses, the promotion and enhancement of Carapa procera can provide significant socio-economic benefits to local people. In this perspective, it is necessary to implement conservation strategies and sustainable management through domestication of the species.

No MeSH data available.


Effects of bark exploitation ofCarapa procera.
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Fig5: Effects of bark exploitation ofCarapa procera.

Mentions: Several plant parts of Carapa procera were exploited by local communities: roots, bark, wood, gum, leaves, nuts (Figure 2a) and mistletoes (Figure 2b). Mistletoes are parasitic plants from the Loranthaceae family growing on branches of some trees and collected for magical and spiritual purposes. The F indicates that nuts were mentioned by all informants (100%) followed by leaves and bark with 21% each (Figure 3). CPP showed that nuts constituted 57% of the citations of exploited plant parts, followed by bark and leaves (12%), wood and roots (7%), mistletoes (4%) and gum (1%) (Figure 4). Field observations have revealed the impact of the bark exploitation that may have adverse effects on the survival of the species (Figure 5). Nuts are usually collected at the beginning of the rainy season during the months from May to June. The other plant parts are exploited in any period.Figure 2


Use-value and importance of socio-cultural knowledge on Carapa procera trees in the Sudanian zone in Mali.

Dembélé U, Lykke AM, Koné Y, Témé B, Kouyaté AM - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2015)

Effects of bark exploitation ofCarapa procera.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4430020&req=5

Fig5: Effects of bark exploitation ofCarapa procera.
Mentions: Several plant parts of Carapa procera were exploited by local communities: roots, bark, wood, gum, leaves, nuts (Figure 2a) and mistletoes (Figure 2b). Mistletoes are parasitic plants from the Loranthaceae family growing on branches of some trees and collected for magical and spiritual purposes. The F indicates that nuts were mentioned by all informants (100%) followed by leaves and bark with 21% each (Figure 3). CPP showed that nuts constituted 57% of the citations of exploited plant parts, followed by bark and leaves (12%), wood and roots (7%), mistletoes (4%) and gum (1%) (Figure 4). Field observations have revealed the impact of the bark exploitation that may have adverse effects on the survival of the species (Figure 5). Nuts are usually collected at the beginning of the rainy season during the months from May to June. The other plant parts are exploited in any period.Figure 2

Bottom Line: This study highlighted the sociocultural importance of Carapa procera.In the light of its multipurpose uses, the promotion and enhancement of Carapa procera can provide significant socio-economic benefits to local people.In this perspective, it is necessary to implement conservation strategies and sustainable management through domestication of the species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut d'Economie Rurale (IER), Rue Mohamed V, BP: 258, Bamako, Mali. udembele@yahoo.fr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Carapa procera is a native oil tree species with multipurpose values traditionally exploited by the local population in Southern Mali. This study focused on the assessment of local knowledge about the use of Carapa procera.

Methods: Semi-structured ethnobotanical questionnaires were conducted among the ethnic groups Senufo, Fulani and Bambara in two localities in the Sudanian zone in Mali. Use values among these ethnic groups and gender were evaluated.

Results: This study showed that Carapa procera is a species with multiple uses and high use values. According to the consensus value for plant parts (CPP), the nuts constituted 57% of exploited plant parts followed by bark and leaves (12%), wood and roots (7%), mistletoes (4%) and gum (1%). The use diversity (UD) values of Carapa procera showed a high proportion of cosmetic (UD = 0.49) and therapeutic (UD = 0.36) uses. The UD for therapeutic uses was higher for ethnic groups in Ziékorodougou than in Niankorobougou. In contrast, the UD for cosmetic uses was higher for ethnic groups in Niankorobougou than in Ziékorodougou. Comparative analysis between ethnic groups revealed that the highest UD for cosmetic uses (0.63) was observed in the Bambara ethnic group, whereas the highest UD for therapeutic uses (0.39) was obtained in the Senufo ethnic group. The UD showed that cosmetic uses were higher for women than for men in both locations. Men in Ziékorodougou had the highest level of knowledge regarding plant parts used, forms of use and the specific reasons for using Carapa procera.

Conclusion: This study highlighted the sociocultural importance of Carapa procera. In the light of its multipurpose uses, the promotion and enhancement of Carapa procera can provide significant socio-economic benefits to local people. In this perspective, it is necessary to implement conservation strategies and sustainable management through domestication of the species.

No MeSH data available.