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Ethnobotany of medicinal plants in Ada'a District, East Shewa Zone of Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia.

Kefalew A, Asfaw Z, Kelbessa E - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2015)

Bottom Line: The objective of the study was to identify and document medicinal plants and the associated ethnobotanical/ethnomedicinal knowledge of the local people.Informants asserted that wild growing medicinal plants are under threat due to increased use pressure coupled with unsuitable harvesting that frequently targets roots and barks for remedy preparations.Furthermore, the study attempted to prioritize the most efficacious medicinal plants as perceived by the local people for possible pharmacological testing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Biology and Biodiversity Management, College of Natural Sciences, Addis Ababa University, 3434, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. alex.aau2001@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants was conducted in Ada'a District, Eastern Shewa Zone of Oromia Regional State of Ethiopia. The objective of the study was to identify and document medicinal plants and the associated ethnobotanical/ethnomedicinal knowledge of the local people.

Methods: Relevant ethnobotanical data focused on medicinal plants and traditional herbal medicines were collected using guided field walk, semi-structured interview and direct field observation. Informant consensus method and group discussion were conducted for crosschecking and verification of the information. Both descriptive statistics and quantitative ethnobotanical methods were used for data analysis.

Results: We documented 131 species distributed in 109 genera and 54 families based on local claims of medicinal values. Patients who are using traditional drugs and herbalists collect most of these plants from the wild. The leading plant families that encompass large medicinal species were the Lamiaceae (14 species) followed by Asteraceae (13) and Solanaceae (7).

Conclusion: The study reported the existence of a number of medicinal plants, an indication for the presence of plant-based traditional medicinal knowledge transfer that survived through generations. Informants asserted that wild growing medicinal plants are under threat due to increased use pressure coupled with unsuitable harvesting that frequently targets roots and barks for remedy preparations. This calls for urgent and collaborative actions to keep the balance between medicinal plants availability in the wild state and their utilization by the community. Furthermore, the study attempted to prioritize the most efficacious medicinal plants as perceived by the local people for possible pharmacological testing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Some ways for measuring doses of herbal medicine in the district (Left ANKOLA, Right BETAT).
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Fig6: Some ways for measuring doses of herbal medicine in the district (Left ANKOLA, Right BETAT).

Mentions: In this study, provisions of doses vary with age. Such cases were not noted for gender variations. Dose of decoction is measured in various ways (see FigureĀ 6) including tea or coffee cups (small for children, and large-sized for youngsters), JOGE (known to be equivalent to a litre), glass for local liquor (locally called YEAREKE MELEKIYA), local alcoholic beverage cup (TELLA cup), and ANKOLA (a traditional cup made of dried fruit of Lagenaria siceraria). Powdered herbal materials were measured roughly on the palm described as BETAT (i. e., measured by holding the powders between the thump and next (index) finger). Visual observations during herbal preparations showed that palm sanitation of herbalists and container was not considered. Healers also prescribed a particular dose to be taken once, twice or three times per day after carrying out traditional physical examination like looking to patients palm or eye.Figure 6


Ethnobotany of medicinal plants in Ada'a District, East Shewa Zone of Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia.

Kefalew A, Asfaw Z, Kelbessa E - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2015)

Some ways for measuring doses of herbal medicine in the district (Left ANKOLA, Right BETAT).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4419563&req=5

Fig6: Some ways for measuring doses of herbal medicine in the district (Left ANKOLA, Right BETAT).
Mentions: In this study, provisions of doses vary with age. Such cases were not noted for gender variations. Dose of decoction is measured in various ways (see FigureĀ 6) including tea or coffee cups (small for children, and large-sized for youngsters), JOGE (known to be equivalent to a litre), glass for local liquor (locally called YEAREKE MELEKIYA), local alcoholic beverage cup (TELLA cup), and ANKOLA (a traditional cup made of dried fruit of Lagenaria siceraria). Powdered herbal materials were measured roughly on the palm described as BETAT (i. e., measured by holding the powders between the thump and next (index) finger). Visual observations during herbal preparations showed that palm sanitation of herbalists and container was not considered. Healers also prescribed a particular dose to be taken once, twice or three times per day after carrying out traditional physical examination like looking to patients palm or eye.Figure 6

Bottom Line: The objective of the study was to identify and document medicinal plants and the associated ethnobotanical/ethnomedicinal knowledge of the local people.Informants asserted that wild growing medicinal plants are under threat due to increased use pressure coupled with unsuitable harvesting that frequently targets roots and barks for remedy preparations.Furthermore, the study attempted to prioritize the most efficacious medicinal plants as perceived by the local people for possible pharmacological testing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Biology and Biodiversity Management, College of Natural Sciences, Addis Ababa University, 3434, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. alex.aau2001@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants was conducted in Ada'a District, Eastern Shewa Zone of Oromia Regional State of Ethiopia. The objective of the study was to identify and document medicinal plants and the associated ethnobotanical/ethnomedicinal knowledge of the local people.

Methods: Relevant ethnobotanical data focused on medicinal plants and traditional herbal medicines were collected using guided field walk, semi-structured interview and direct field observation. Informant consensus method and group discussion were conducted for crosschecking and verification of the information. Both descriptive statistics and quantitative ethnobotanical methods were used for data analysis.

Results: We documented 131 species distributed in 109 genera and 54 families based on local claims of medicinal values. Patients who are using traditional drugs and herbalists collect most of these plants from the wild. The leading plant families that encompass large medicinal species were the Lamiaceae (14 species) followed by Asteraceae (13) and Solanaceae (7).

Conclusion: The study reported the existence of a number of medicinal plants, an indication for the presence of plant-based traditional medicinal knowledge transfer that survived through generations. Informants asserted that wild growing medicinal plants are under threat due to increased use pressure coupled with unsuitable harvesting that frequently targets roots and barks for remedy preparations. This calls for urgent and collaborative actions to keep the balance between medicinal plants availability in the wild state and their utilization by the community. Furthermore, the study attempted to prioritize the most efficacious medicinal plants as perceived by the local people for possible pharmacological testing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus