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Morphological diversity in tenrecs (Afrosoricida, Tenrecidae): comparing tenrec skull diversity to their closest relatives.

Finlay S, Cooper N - PeerJ (2015)

Bottom Line: However, this assumption has not been tested quantitatively.Furthermore, similarities among the species-rich Microgale tenrec genus appear to mask higher morphological diversity in the rest of the family.These results reveal new insights into the morphological diversity of tenrecs and highlight the importance of using quantitative methods to test qualitative assumptions about patterns of morphological diversity.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin , Dublin , Ireland.

ABSTRACT
It is important to quantify patterns of morphological diversity to enhance our understanding of variation in ecological and evolutionary traits. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of morphological diversity in a family of small mammals, the tenrecs (Afrosoricida, Tenrecidae). Tenrecs are often cited as an example of an exceptionally morphologically diverse group. However, this assumption has not been tested quantitatively. We use geometric morphometric analyses of skull shape to test whether tenrecs are more morphologically diverse than their closest relatives, the golden moles (Afrosoricida, Chrysochloridae). Tenrecs occupy a wider range of ecological niches than golden moles so we predict that they will be more morphologically diverse. Contrary to our expectations, we find that tenrec skulls are only more morphologically diverse than golden moles when measured in lateral view. Furthermore, similarities among the species-rich Microgale tenrec genus appear to mask higher morphological diversity in the rest of the family. These results reveal new insights into the morphological diversity of tenrecs and highlight the importance of using quantitative methods to test qualitative assumptions about patterns of morphological diversity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Skulls: dorsal, ventral and lateral landmarks.Landmarks (numbered points) and curves (outlines) for the skulls in dorsal (A),ventral (B) and lateral (C) view. See the Supplemental Information for detailed landmark descriptions. The skulls are an example of a Potamogale velox (otter shrew tenrec), museum accession number BMNH 1934.6.16.2.
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fig-2: Skulls: dorsal, ventral and lateral landmarks.Landmarks (numbered points) and curves (outlines) for the skulls in dorsal (A),ventral (B) and lateral (C) view. See the Supplemental Information for detailed landmark descriptions. The skulls are an example of a Potamogale velox (otter shrew tenrec), museum accession number BMNH 1934.6.16.2.

Mentions: Figure 2 depicts the landmarks and curves which we used for each skull view. For landmarks defined by dental structures, we used published dental sources where available (Repenning, 1967; Eisenberg & Gould, 1969; Nowak, 1983; MacPhee, 1987; Knox Jones & Manning, 1992; Davis & Schmidly, 1997; Quérouil et al., 2001; Nagorsen, 2002; Wilson & Reeder, 2005; Goodman et al., 2006; Karataş, Mouradi Gharkheloo & Kankiliç, 2007; Hoffmann & Lunde, 2008; Asher & Lehmann, 2008; Muldoon et al., 2009; Lin & Motokawa, 2010) to identify the number and type of teeth in each species. Detailed descriptions of the landmarks can be found in the Supplemental Information (Tables S1, S2, S3) along with an example figure of landmarks on golden mole skulls (Fig. S1).


Morphological diversity in tenrecs (Afrosoricida, Tenrecidae): comparing tenrec skull diversity to their closest relatives.

Finlay S, Cooper N - PeerJ (2015)

Skulls: dorsal, ventral and lateral landmarks.Landmarks (numbered points) and curves (outlines) for the skulls in dorsal (A),ventral (B) and lateral (C) view. See the Supplemental Information for detailed landmark descriptions. The skulls are an example of a Potamogale velox (otter shrew tenrec), museum accession number BMNH 1934.6.16.2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4419542&req=5

fig-2: Skulls: dorsal, ventral and lateral landmarks.Landmarks (numbered points) and curves (outlines) for the skulls in dorsal (A),ventral (B) and lateral (C) view. See the Supplemental Information for detailed landmark descriptions. The skulls are an example of a Potamogale velox (otter shrew tenrec), museum accession number BMNH 1934.6.16.2.
Mentions: Figure 2 depicts the landmarks and curves which we used for each skull view. For landmarks defined by dental structures, we used published dental sources where available (Repenning, 1967; Eisenberg & Gould, 1969; Nowak, 1983; MacPhee, 1987; Knox Jones & Manning, 1992; Davis & Schmidly, 1997; Quérouil et al., 2001; Nagorsen, 2002; Wilson & Reeder, 2005; Goodman et al., 2006; Karataş, Mouradi Gharkheloo & Kankiliç, 2007; Hoffmann & Lunde, 2008; Asher & Lehmann, 2008; Muldoon et al., 2009; Lin & Motokawa, 2010) to identify the number and type of teeth in each species. Detailed descriptions of the landmarks can be found in the Supplemental Information (Tables S1, S2, S3) along with an example figure of landmarks on golden mole skulls (Fig. S1).

Bottom Line: However, this assumption has not been tested quantitatively.Furthermore, similarities among the species-rich Microgale tenrec genus appear to mask higher morphological diversity in the rest of the family.These results reveal new insights into the morphological diversity of tenrecs and highlight the importance of using quantitative methods to test qualitative assumptions about patterns of morphological diversity.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin , Dublin , Ireland.

ABSTRACT
It is important to quantify patterns of morphological diversity to enhance our understanding of variation in ecological and evolutionary traits. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of morphological diversity in a family of small mammals, the tenrecs (Afrosoricida, Tenrecidae). Tenrecs are often cited as an example of an exceptionally morphologically diverse group. However, this assumption has not been tested quantitatively. We use geometric morphometric analyses of skull shape to test whether tenrecs are more morphologically diverse than their closest relatives, the golden moles (Afrosoricida, Chrysochloridae). Tenrecs occupy a wider range of ecological niches than golden moles so we predict that they will be more morphologically diverse. Contrary to our expectations, we find that tenrec skulls are only more morphologically diverse than golden moles when measured in lateral view. Furthermore, similarities among the species-rich Microgale tenrec genus appear to mask higher morphological diversity in the rest of the family. These results reveal new insights into the morphological diversity of tenrecs and highlight the importance of using quantitative methods to test qualitative assumptions about patterns of morphological diversity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus