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Temporal perception deficits in schizophrenia: integration is the problem, not deployment of attentions.

Su L, Wyble B, Zhou LQ, Wang K, Wang YN, Cheung EF, Bowman H, Chan RC - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: There was no difference between individuals with/without schizotypal personality disorder in temporal integration.Instead, we used both theoretical and empirical approaches to show that previous findings (using the suppression ratio to correct for the baseline difference) produced a systematic exaggeration of the attention deficits.Instead, we modulated the perceptual difficulty of the task to bring the baseline levels of target detection between the groups into closer alignment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK [2] Neuropsychology and Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Patients with schizophrenia are known to have impairments in sensory processing. In order to understand the specific temporal perception deficits of schizophrenia, we investigated and determined to what extent impairments in temporal integration can be dissociated from attention deployment using Attentional Blink (AB). Our findings showed that there was no evident deficit in the deployment of attention in patients with schizophrenia. However, patients showed an increased temporal integration deficit within a hundred-millisecond timescale. The degree of such integration dysfunction was correlated with the clinical manifestations of schizophrenia. There was no difference between individuals with/without schizotypal personality disorder in temporal integration. Differently from previous studies using the AB, we did not find a significant impairment in deployment of attention in schizophrenia. Instead, we used both theoretical and empirical approaches to show that previous findings (using the suppression ratio to correct for the baseline difference) produced a systematic exaggeration of the attention deficits. Instead, we modulated the perceptual difficulty of the task to bring the baseline levels of target detection between the groups into closer alignment. We found that the integration dysfunction rather than deployment of attention is clinically relevant, and thus should be an additional focus of research in schizophrenia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation between the decay rate for each patient and the clinical manifestations of schizophrenia indicated by PANSS scores - (a) positive, (b) negative, (c) general psychopathology and (d) total.
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f6: Correlation between the decay rate for each patient and the clinical manifestations of schizophrenia indicated by PANSS scores - (a) positive, (b) negative, (c) general psychopathology and (d) total.

Mentions: We have also fitted the temporal binding errors for each individual patient to the EDF and correlated the resulting decay rates with patients’ clinical symptoms. We found a significant linear correlation between the decay rate parameter and the positive subscale score of PANSS, r(22) = 0.58, p = 0.0029, the general psychopathology subscale score of PANSS, r(22) = 0.68, p = 0.002, and the total PANSS score, r(22) = 0.64, p = 0.0008, but not for the negative subscale of PANSS and other variables including age, IQ, education, logic/visual memory, CPZ equivalent, illness duration and performance on the N-back task. See Fig. 6 for correlation with the PANSS.


Temporal perception deficits in schizophrenia: integration is the problem, not deployment of attentions.

Su L, Wyble B, Zhou LQ, Wang K, Wang YN, Cheung EF, Bowman H, Chan RC - Sci Rep (2015)

Correlation between the decay rate for each patient and the clinical manifestations of schizophrenia indicated by PANSS scores - (a) positive, (b) negative, (c) general psychopathology and (d) total.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4419531&req=5

f6: Correlation between the decay rate for each patient and the clinical manifestations of schizophrenia indicated by PANSS scores - (a) positive, (b) negative, (c) general psychopathology and (d) total.
Mentions: We have also fitted the temporal binding errors for each individual patient to the EDF and correlated the resulting decay rates with patients’ clinical symptoms. We found a significant linear correlation between the decay rate parameter and the positive subscale score of PANSS, r(22) = 0.58, p = 0.0029, the general psychopathology subscale score of PANSS, r(22) = 0.68, p = 0.002, and the total PANSS score, r(22) = 0.64, p = 0.0008, but not for the negative subscale of PANSS and other variables including age, IQ, education, logic/visual memory, CPZ equivalent, illness duration and performance on the N-back task. See Fig. 6 for correlation with the PANSS.

Bottom Line: There was no difference between individuals with/without schizotypal personality disorder in temporal integration.Instead, we used both theoretical and empirical approaches to show that previous findings (using the suppression ratio to correct for the baseline difference) produced a systematic exaggeration of the attention deficits.Instead, we modulated the perceptual difficulty of the task to bring the baseline levels of target detection between the groups into closer alignment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK [2] Neuropsychology and Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Patients with schizophrenia are known to have impairments in sensory processing. In order to understand the specific temporal perception deficits of schizophrenia, we investigated and determined to what extent impairments in temporal integration can be dissociated from attention deployment using Attentional Blink (AB). Our findings showed that there was no evident deficit in the deployment of attention in patients with schizophrenia. However, patients showed an increased temporal integration deficit within a hundred-millisecond timescale. The degree of such integration dysfunction was correlated with the clinical manifestations of schizophrenia. There was no difference between individuals with/without schizotypal personality disorder in temporal integration. Differently from previous studies using the AB, we did not find a significant impairment in deployment of attention in schizophrenia. Instead, we used both theoretical and empirical approaches to show that previous findings (using the suppression ratio to correct for the baseline difference) produced a systematic exaggeration of the attention deficits. Instead, we modulated the perceptual difficulty of the task to bring the baseline levels of target detection between the groups into closer alignment. We found that the integration dysfunction rather than deployment of attention is clinically relevant, and thus should be an additional focus of research in schizophrenia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus