Limits...
Medical students' attitude towards influenza vaccination.

Lehmann BA, Ruiter RA, Wicker S, Chapman G, Kok G - BMC Infect. Dis. (2015)

Bottom Line: However, medical students do not always have such easy access, and the predictors that might guide the motivation of medical students to get vaccinated are largely unknown.We conducted a cross-sectional survey study among pre-clinical medical students in a German University hospital to assess the social cognitive predictors of influenza vaccination, as well as reasons for refusal and acceptance of the vaccine.The identified factors should be addressed early in medical education, and hospitals might benefit from a more inclusive vaccination program and accessibility of free vaccines for their medical students.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Work & Social Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands. birthe.lehmann@maastrichtuniversity.nl.

ABSTRACT

Background: Influenza vaccination is recommended for all healthcare personnel (HCP) and most institutions offer vaccination for free and on site. However, medical students do not always have such easy access, and the predictors that might guide the motivation of medical students to get vaccinated are largely unknown.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey study among pre-clinical medical students in a German University hospital to assess the social cognitive predictors of influenza vaccination, as well as reasons for refusal and acceptance of the vaccine.

Results: Findings show that pre-clinical medical students have comparable knowledge gaps and negative attitudes towards influenza vaccination that have previously been reported among HCP. Lower injunctive norms and higher feelings of autonomy contribute to no intention to get vaccinated against influenza, while a positive instrumental attitude and higher feelings of autonomy contribute to a high intention to get vaccinated. The variables in the regression model explained 20% of the variance in intention to get vaccinated.

Conclusions: The identified factors should be addressed early in medical education, and hospitals might benefit from a more inclusive vaccination program and accessibility of free vaccines for their medical students.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Regression coefficients for the relationship between instrumental attitude and intention to get vaccinated (no/ unsure) as mediated by injunctive norm. The path between instrumental attitude and injunctive norm is an OLS regression coefficient, while the other paths are logistic regression coefficients. The logistic regression coefficient between instrumental attitude and intention, controlling for injunctive norm, is in parentheses. *p < .05; ** p < .01.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4419496&req=5

Fig1: Regression coefficients for the relationship between instrumental attitude and intention to get vaccinated (no/ unsure) as mediated by injunctive norm. The path between instrumental attitude and injunctive norm is an OLS regression coefficient, while the other paths are logistic regression coefficients. The logistic regression coefficient between instrumental attitude and intention, controlling for injunctive norm, is in parentheses. *p < .05; ** p < .01.

Mentions: In an exploratory manner we excluded the most influential variables autonomy and injunctive norm from the multinominal analysis and found that negative instrumental attitude became a significant predictor of no intention to get vaccinated as opposed to an unclear decision when injunctive norm was excluded. Therefore, we conducted a binary logistic regression using a bootstrapping technique [20] to analyse whether injunctive norm mediated the relationship between instrumental attitude and intention (no intention/ unsure; N = 420). The bias corrected and accelerated (BCa) confidence intervals were set at 0.95 with 5000 resamples. In the mediation analysis, instrumental attitude was the independent variable, intention (no/ unsure) was the dependent variable, and injunctive norm was the mediator. Results revealed a significant mediation effect of injunctive norm on the relationship between instrumental attitude and intention (b = .14, BCa 95% CI [.074; .225]; see Figure 1).Figure 1


Medical students' attitude towards influenza vaccination.

Lehmann BA, Ruiter RA, Wicker S, Chapman G, Kok G - BMC Infect. Dis. (2015)

Regression coefficients for the relationship between instrumental attitude and intention to get vaccinated (no/ unsure) as mediated by injunctive norm. The path between instrumental attitude and injunctive norm is an OLS regression coefficient, while the other paths are logistic regression coefficients. The logistic regression coefficient between instrumental attitude and intention, controlling for injunctive norm, is in parentheses. *p < .05; ** p < .01.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4419496&req=5

Fig1: Regression coefficients for the relationship between instrumental attitude and intention to get vaccinated (no/ unsure) as mediated by injunctive norm. The path between instrumental attitude and injunctive norm is an OLS regression coefficient, while the other paths are logistic regression coefficients. The logistic regression coefficient between instrumental attitude and intention, controlling for injunctive norm, is in parentheses. *p < .05; ** p < .01.
Mentions: In an exploratory manner we excluded the most influential variables autonomy and injunctive norm from the multinominal analysis and found that negative instrumental attitude became a significant predictor of no intention to get vaccinated as opposed to an unclear decision when injunctive norm was excluded. Therefore, we conducted a binary logistic regression using a bootstrapping technique [20] to analyse whether injunctive norm mediated the relationship between instrumental attitude and intention (no intention/ unsure; N = 420). The bias corrected and accelerated (BCa) confidence intervals were set at 0.95 with 5000 resamples. In the mediation analysis, instrumental attitude was the independent variable, intention (no/ unsure) was the dependent variable, and injunctive norm was the mediator. Results revealed a significant mediation effect of injunctive norm on the relationship between instrumental attitude and intention (b = .14, BCa 95% CI [.074; .225]; see Figure 1).Figure 1

Bottom Line: However, medical students do not always have such easy access, and the predictors that might guide the motivation of medical students to get vaccinated are largely unknown.We conducted a cross-sectional survey study among pre-clinical medical students in a German University hospital to assess the social cognitive predictors of influenza vaccination, as well as reasons for refusal and acceptance of the vaccine.The identified factors should be addressed early in medical education, and hospitals might benefit from a more inclusive vaccination program and accessibility of free vaccines for their medical students.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Work & Social Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands. birthe.lehmann@maastrichtuniversity.nl.

ABSTRACT

Background: Influenza vaccination is recommended for all healthcare personnel (HCP) and most institutions offer vaccination for free and on site. However, medical students do not always have such easy access, and the predictors that might guide the motivation of medical students to get vaccinated are largely unknown.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey study among pre-clinical medical students in a German University hospital to assess the social cognitive predictors of influenza vaccination, as well as reasons for refusal and acceptance of the vaccine.

Results: Findings show that pre-clinical medical students have comparable knowledge gaps and negative attitudes towards influenza vaccination that have previously been reported among HCP. Lower injunctive norms and higher feelings of autonomy contribute to no intention to get vaccinated against influenza, while a positive instrumental attitude and higher feelings of autonomy contribute to a high intention to get vaccinated. The variables in the regression model explained 20% of the variance in intention to get vaccinated.

Conclusions: The identified factors should be addressed early in medical education, and hospitals might benefit from a more inclusive vaccination program and accessibility of free vaccines for their medical students.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus