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Characteristics of attitude and recommendation of oncologists toward exercise in South Korea: a cross sectional survey study.

Park JH, Oh M, Yoon YJ, Lee CW, Jones LW, Kim SI, Kim NK, Jeon JY - BMC Cancer (2015)

Bottom Line: To analyze the data, the one-way ANOVA, and t-test were used.All data were indicated for mean, SD, and proportions.The average amount of participation in physical activity by oncologists who participated in the study was 139.5 ± 120.3 min per week, and 11.4% of the study participants met the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sport and Leisure Studies, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-Ro, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul, 120-749, Korea. hobbang1922@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of the present study was to examine 1) characteristics and attitudes of oncologists toward exercise and toward recommending exercise to their patients, 2) association among oncologists' own physical activity levels, exercise recommendations, and their attitudes toward recommending exercise.

Methods: A total of 167 oncologists participated in this survey study (41 surgeons, 78 medical oncologists, 25 radiation oncologists, and 21 others). Most oncologists included in the study treat more than one type of cancer, including colorectal, gastric, breast, lung, and liver cancer. To analyze the data, the one-way ANOVA, and t-test were used. All data were indicated for mean, SD, and proportions.

Results: Most oncologists agreed that exercise is beneficial (72.8%) and important (69.6%), but only 39.2% of them agreed that exercise is safe, and only 7.2% believed that cancer patients manage to exercise during cancer treatment. Forty-six percentage of the surveyed oncologists recommended exercise to their patients during the past month. The average amount of participation in physical activity by oncologists who participated in the study was 139.5 ± 120.3 min per week, and 11.4% of the study participants met the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines. Oncologists' own physical activity levels were associated with their attitudes toward recommending exercise. Belief in the benefits of exercise in the performance of daily tasks, improvement of mental health, and the attenuation of physical decline from treatment were the three most prevalent reasons why oncologists recommend exercise to their patients. Barriers to recommending exercise to patients included lack of time, unclear exercise recommendations, and the safety of patients.

Conclusions: Oncologists have favorable attitudes toward exercise and toward recommending exercise to their patients during treatment. However, they also experience barriers to recommending exercise, including lack of time, unclear exercise guidelines for cancer patients, and concerns regarding the safety of exercise.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Exercise recommendations across benefits of exercise for cancer survivors. Figure legend: *p < .05 for difference within group. Oncologists who believe the benefit of exercise on each questionnaire item chose ‘yes’ while those who did not believe the benefit of exercise on each questionnaire item chose ‘no’. Y axis represent percentage of exercise recommendation to their patients.
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Fig1: Exercise recommendations across benefits of exercise for cancer survivors. Figure legend: *p < .05 for difference within group. Oncologists who believe the benefit of exercise on each questionnaire item chose ‘yes’ while those who did not believe the benefit of exercise on each questionnaire item chose ‘no’. Y axis represent percentage of exercise recommendation to their patients.

Mentions: To understand the impact of oncologists’ perceived benefits of exercise on exercise recommendations, we analyzed the percentage of oncologists’ exercise recommendation based on their perceived benefits of exercise. Our analysis showed that oncologists who believe that participation in exercise will improve their patients’ mental health as well as reduce the risk of other diseases recommended exercise more (Figure 1). To understand the association between exercise recommendation barriers and exercise recommendations, we analyzed the percent of oncologists’ exercise recommendation based on items of oncologists’ exercise recommendation barriers. Our analysis showed that oncologists who have concerns regarding unclear exercise guidelines for cancer patients and the effectiveness of exercise for cancer patients recommended exercise to their patients significantly less (Figure 2).Figure 1


Characteristics of attitude and recommendation of oncologists toward exercise in South Korea: a cross sectional survey study.

Park JH, Oh M, Yoon YJ, Lee CW, Jones LW, Kim SI, Kim NK, Jeon JY - BMC Cancer (2015)

Exercise recommendations across benefits of exercise for cancer survivors. Figure legend: *p < .05 for difference within group. Oncologists who believe the benefit of exercise on each questionnaire item chose ‘yes’ while those who did not believe the benefit of exercise on each questionnaire item chose ‘no’. Y axis represent percentage of exercise recommendation to their patients.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4419471&req=5

Fig1: Exercise recommendations across benefits of exercise for cancer survivors. Figure legend: *p < .05 for difference within group. Oncologists who believe the benefit of exercise on each questionnaire item chose ‘yes’ while those who did not believe the benefit of exercise on each questionnaire item chose ‘no’. Y axis represent percentage of exercise recommendation to their patients.
Mentions: To understand the impact of oncologists’ perceived benefits of exercise on exercise recommendations, we analyzed the percentage of oncologists’ exercise recommendation based on their perceived benefits of exercise. Our analysis showed that oncologists who believe that participation in exercise will improve their patients’ mental health as well as reduce the risk of other diseases recommended exercise more (Figure 1). To understand the association between exercise recommendation barriers and exercise recommendations, we analyzed the percent of oncologists’ exercise recommendation based on items of oncologists’ exercise recommendation barriers. Our analysis showed that oncologists who have concerns regarding unclear exercise guidelines for cancer patients and the effectiveness of exercise for cancer patients recommended exercise to their patients significantly less (Figure 2).Figure 1

Bottom Line: To analyze the data, the one-way ANOVA, and t-test were used.All data were indicated for mean, SD, and proportions.The average amount of participation in physical activity by oncologists who participated in the study was 139.5 ± 120.3 min per week, and 11.4% of the study participants met the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sport and Leisure Studies, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-Ro, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul, 120-749, Korea. hobbang1922@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of the present study was to examine 1) characteristics and attitudes of oncologists toward exercise and toward recommending exercise to their patients, 2) association among oncologists' own physical activity levels, exercise recommendations, and their attitudes toward recommending exercise.

Methods: A total of 167 oncologists participated in this survey study (41 surgeons, 78 medical oncologists, 25 radiation oncologists, and 21 others). Most oncologists included in the study treat more than one type of cancer, including colorectal, gastric, breast, lung, and liver cancer. To analyze the data, the one-way ANOVA, and t-test were used. All data were indicated for mean, SD, and proportions.

Results: Most oncologists agreed that exercise is beneficial (72.8%) and important (69.6%), but only 39.2% of them agreed that exercise is safe, and only 7.2% believed that cancer patients manage to exercise during cancer treatment. Forty-six percentage of the surveyed oncologists recommended exercise to their patients during the past month. The average amount of participation in physical activity by oncologists who participated in the study was 139.5 ± 120.3 min per week, and 11.4% of the study participants met the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines. Oncologists' own physical activity levels were associated with their attitudes toward recommending exercise. Belief in the benefits of exercise in the performance of daily tasks, improvement of mental health, and the attenuation of physical decline from treatment were the three most prevalent reasons why oncologists recommend exercise to their patients. Barriers to recommending exercise to patients included lack of time, unclear exercise recommendations, and the safety of patients.

Conclusions: Oncologists have favorable attitudes toward exercise and toward recommending exercise to their patients during treatment. However, they also experience barriers to recommending exercise, including lack of time, unclear exercise guidelines for cancer patients, and concerns regarding the safety of exercise.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus