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The structural influence of family and parenting on young people's sexual and reproductive health in rural northern Tanzania.

Wamoyi J, Wight D, Remes P - Cult Health Sex (2015)

Bottom Line: At an individual level, parenting and family structure were found to affect young people's sexual behaviour by influencing children's self-confidence and interactional competence, limiting discussion of sexual health and shaping economic provision for children, which in turn affected parental authority and daughters' engagement in risky sexual behaviour.Sexual norms are reproduced both through parents' explicit prohibitions and their own behaviours.Interventions to improve young people's sexual and reproductive health should recognise the structural effects of parenting, both in terms of direct influences on children and the dynamics by which structural barriers such as gendered power relations and cultural norms around sexuality are transmitted across generations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a National Institute for Medical Research , Mwanza , Tanzania.

ABSTRACT
This paper explores the structural role of the family and parenting in young people's sexual and reproductive health. The study involved eight weeks of participant observation, 26 in-depth interviews, and 11 group discussions with young people aged 14-24 years, and 20 in-depth interviews and 6 group discussions with parents/carers of children in this age group. At an individual level, parenting and family structure were found to affect young people's sexual behaviour by influencing children's self-confidence and interactional competence, limiting discussion of sexual health and shaping economic provision for children, which in turn affected parental authority and daughters' engagement in risky sexual behaviour. Sexual norms are reproduced both through parents' explicit prohibitions and their own behaviours. Girls are socialised to accept men's superiority, which shapes their negotiation of sexual relationships. Interventions to improve young people's sexual and reproductive health should recognise the structural effects of parenting, both in terms of direct influences on children and the dynamics by which structural barriers such as gendered power relations and cultural norms around sexuality are transmitted across generations.

No MeSH data available.


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Structural influences of, and on, the family, and pathways to sexual behaviour.
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f0001: Structural influences of, and on, the family, and pathways to sexual behaviour.

Mentions: Our focus here is on how the family acts in a structural way to impact on young people's vulnerability or resilience to poor SRH, although we acknowledge that macro-level structural factors also shape how families themselves operate (Figure 1). We conceive of structural factors as operating at different socio-ecological levels (Evans, Jana, and Lambert 2010) but, as indicated in Figure 1, it is important to acknowledge that as one moves from the micro to the macro level, structural factors become more powerful and allow less scope for agency.Figure 1 Structural influences of, and on, the family, and pathways to sexual behaviour.


The structural influence of family and parenting on young people's sexual and reproductive health in rural northern Tanzania.

Wamoyi J, Wight D, Remes P - Cult Health Sex (2015)

Structural influences of, and on, the family, and pathways to sexual behaviour.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4419469&req=5

f0001: Structural influences of, and on, the family, and pathways to sexual behaviour.
Mentions: Our focus here is on how the family acts in a structural way to impact on young people's vulnerability or resilience to poor SRH, although we acknowledge that macro-level structural factors also shape how families themselves operate (Figure 1). We conceive of structural factors as operating at different socio-ecological levels (Evans, Jana, and Lambert 2010) but, as indicated in Figure 1, it is important to acknowledge that as one moves from the micro to the macro level, structural factors become more powerful and allow less scope for agency.Figure 1 Structural influences of, and on, the family, and pathways to sexual behaviour.

Bottom Line: At an individual level, parenting and family structure were found to affect young people's sexual behaviour by influencing children's self-confidence and interactional competence, limiting discussion of sexual health and shaping economic provision for children, which in turn affected parental authority and daughters' engagement in risky sexual behaviour.Sexual norms are reproduced both through parents' explicit prohibitions and their own behaviours.Interventions to improve young people's sexual and reproductive health should recognise the structural effects of parenting, both in terms of direct influences on children and the dynamics by which structural barriers such as gendered power relations and cultural norms around sexuality are transmitted across generations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a National Institute for Medical Research , Mwanza , Tanzania.

ABSTRACT
This paper explores the structural role of the family and parenting in young people's sexual and reproductive health. The study involved eight weeks of participant observation, 26 in-depth interviews, and 11 group discussions with young people aged 14-24 years, and 20 in-depth interviews and 6 group discussions with parents/carers of children in this age group. At an individual level, parenting and family structure were found to affect young people's sexual behaviour by influencing children's self-confidence and interactional competence, limiting discussion of sexual health and shaping economic provision for children, which in turn affected parental authority and daughters' engagement in risky sexual behaviour. Sexual norms are reproduced both through parents' explicit prohibitions and their own behaviours. Girls are socialised to accept men's superiority, which shapes their negotiation of sexual relationships. Interventions to improve young people's sexual and reproductive health should recognise the structural effects of parenting, both in terms of direct influences on children and the dynamics by which structural barriers such as gendered power relations and cultural norms around sexuality are transmitted across generations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus