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Rheological characterization of an injectable alginate gel system.

Larsen BE, Bjørnstad J, Pettersen EO, Tønnesen HH, Melvik JE - BMC Biotechnol. (2015)

Bottom Line: By mixing the two components and varying the parameters mentioned above, alginate gel matrices with tailor-made viscoelastic properties and gelling kinetics were obtained.Final gel elasticity depended on alginate type, concentration and gelling ion.Formulations of the injectable and moldable alginate system presented have recently been used within specific medical applications and may have potential within regenerative medicine or other fields.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. benjamil@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: This work investigates a general method for producing alginate gel matrices using an internal mode of gelation that depends solely on soluble alginate and alginate/gelling ion particles. The method involves the formulation of two-component kits comprised of soluble alginate and insoluble alginate/gelling ion particles. Gelling kinetics, elastic and Young's moduli were investigated for selected parameters with regard to soluble alginate guluronate content, molecular weight, calcium or strontium gelling ions and alginate gelling ion particle sizes in the range between 25 and 125 micrometers.

Results: By mixing the two components and varying the parameters mentioned above, alginate gel matrices with tailor-made viscoelastic properties and gelling kinetics were obtained. Final gel elasticity depended on alginate type, concentration and gelling ion. The gelling rate could be manipulated, e.g. through selection of the alginate type and molecular weight, particle sizes and the concentration of non-gelling ions.

Conclusions: Formulations of the injectable and moldable alginate system presented have recently been used within specific medical applications and may have potential within regenerative medicine or other fields.

No MeSH data available.


Storage modulus and kinetics of alginate gels as a function of particle size. Upper panel: Storage modulus of alginate gels as a function of time for gels made of sodium alginate (Fg = 0.7 and MW = 219 kDa) and Sr alginate at different particle sizes. The total alginate concentration was 2.1%, consisting of 1.0% from sodium alginate and 1.1% from Sr alginate. The curves were fitted by eq. 1 to the average data from three independent runs. Lower panel: Calculated maximum storage modulus (A) and half time (t1/2) for the fitted data. Error bars denote the standard error of the mean calculated at each data point, and are shown when exceeding the dimension of point markers.
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Fig4: Storage modulus and kinetics of alginate gels as a function of particle size. Upper panel: Storage modulus of alginate gels as a function of time for gels made of sodium alginate (Fg = 0.7 and MW = 219 kDa) and Sr alginate at different particle sizes. The total alginate concentration was 2.1%, consisting of 1.0% from sodium alginate and 1.1% from Sr alginate. The curves were fitted by eq. 1 to the average data from three independent runs. Lower panel: Calculated maximum storage modulus (A) and half time (t1/2) for the fitted data. Error bars denote the standard error of the mean calculated at each data point, and are shown when exceeding the dimension of point markers.

Mentions: Alginate gelling formulations tested


Rheological characterization of an injectable alginate gel system.

Larsen BE, Bjørnstad J, Pettersen EO, Tønnesen HH, Melvik JE - BMC Biotechnol. (2015)

Storage modulus and kinetics of alginate gels as a function of particle size. Upper panel: Storage modulus of alginate gels as a function of time for gels made of sodium alginate (Fg = 0.7 and MW = 219 kDa) and Sr alginate at different particle sizes. The total alginate concentration was 2.1%, consisting of 1.0% from sodium alginate and 1.1% from Sr alginate. The curves were fitted by eq. 1 to the average data from three independent runs. Lower panel: Calculated maximum storage modulus (A) and half time (t1/2) for the fitted data. Error bars denote the standard error of the mean calculated at each data point, and are shown when exceeding the dimension of point markers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4419456&req=5

Fig4: Storage modulus and kinetics of alginate gels as a function of particle size. Upper panel: Storage modulus of alginate gels as a function of time for gels made of sodium alginate (Fg = 0.7 and MW = 219 kDa) and Sr alginate at different particle sizes. The total alginate concentration was 2.1%, consisting of 1.0% from sodium alginate and 1.1% from Sr alginate. The curves were fitted by eq. 1 to the average data from three independent runs. Lower panel: Calculated maximum storage modulus (A) and half time (t1/2) for the fitted data. Error bars denote the standard error of the mean calculated at each data point, and are shown when exceeding the dimension of point markers.
Mentions: Alginate gelling formulations tested

Bottom Line: By mixing the two components and varying the parameters mentioned above, alginate gel matrices with tailor-made viscoelastic properties and gelling kinetics were obtained.Final gel elasticity depended on alginate type, concentration and gelling ion.Formulations of the injectable and moldable alginate system presented have recently been used within specific medical applications and may have potential within regenerative medicine or other fields.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. benjamil@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: This work investigates a general method for producing alginate gel matrices using an internal mode of gelation that depends solely on soluble alginate and alginate/gelling ion particles. The method involves the formulation of two-component kits comprised of soluble alginate and insoluble alginate/gelling ion particles. Gelling kinetics, elastic and Young's moduli were investigated for selected parameters with regard to soluble alginate guluronate content, molecular weight, calcium or strontium gelling ions and alginate gelling ion particle sizes in the range between 25 and 125 micrometers.

Results: By mixing the two components and varying the parameters mentioned above, alginate gel matrices with tailor-made viscoelastic properties and gelling kinetics were obtained. Final gel elasticity depended on alginate type, concentration and gelling ion. The gelling rate could be manipulated, e.g. through selection of the alginate type and molecular weight, particle sizes and the concentration of non-gelling ions.

Conclusions: Formulations of the injectable and moldable alginate system presented have recently been used within specific medical applications and may have potential within regenerative medicine or other fields.

No MeSH data available.