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Intrinsic immunomodulatory effects of low-digestible carbohydrates selectively extend their anti-inflammatory prebiotic potentials.

Breton J, Plé C, Guerin-Deremaux L, Pot B, Lefranc-Millot C, Wils D, Foligné B - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: The immunosuppressive fiber significantly reduced levels of inflammatory markers over both treatment periods, whereas a nonimmunomodulatory fiber had no effect.The two fibers did not differ in terms of the observed fermentation products and colonic microbiota after three weeks of treatment, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory action was not related to prebiotic properties.Hence, we observed a direct effect of a specific fiber on the murine immune system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bactéries Lactiques & Immunité des Muqueuses, Centre d'Infection et d'Immunité de Lille, Institut Pasteur de Lille, U1019, UMR8204, Université Lille Nord de France, 1 rue du Pr Calmette, BP 245, 59019 Lille Cedex, France.

ABSTRACT
The beneficial effects of carbohydrate-derived fibers are mainly attributed to modulation of the microbiota, increased colonic fermentation, and the production of short-chain fatty acids. We studied the direct immune responses to alimentary fibers in in vitro and in vivo models. Firstly, we evaluated the immunomodulation induced by nine different types of low-digestible fibers on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. None of the fibers tested induced cytokine production in baseline conditions. However, only one from all fibers almost completely inhibited the production of anti- and proinflammatory cytokines induced by bacteria. Secondly, the impact of short- (five days) and long-term (three weeks) oral treatments with selected fibers was assessed in the trinitrobenzene-sulfonic acid colitis model in mice. The immunosuppressive fiber significantly reduced levels of inflammatory markers over both treatment periods, whereas a nonimmunomodulatory fiber had no effect. The two fibers did not differ in terms of the observed fermentation products and colonic microbiota after three weeks of treatment, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory action was not related to prebiotic properties. Hence, we observed a direct effect of a specific fiber on the murine immune system. This intrinsic, fiber-dependent immunomodulatory potential may extend prebiotic-mediated protection in inflammatory bowel disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Colonic fermentation after 25 days of treatment with the selected fibers: levels of SCFAs (acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid) were measured in the caecal samples of mice from the control, Fiber 1, and Fiber 2 groups after 25 days of treatment. Values are reported in mmol per gram of wet caecal material. ∗∗P < 0.01.
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fig4: Colonic fermentation after 25 days of treatment with the selected fibers: levels of SCFAs (acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid) were measured in the caecal samples of mice from the control, Fiber 1, and Fiber 2 groups after 25 days of treatment. Values are reported in mmol per gram of wet caecal material. ∗∗P < 0.01.

Mentions: To rule out the possibility that the observed protection against colitis was due to a “standard” prebiotic effect, we measured the production of anti-inflammatory SCFAs (i.e., the cecal SCFA content of mice administered Fiber 1, Fiber 2, or a control saline solution for 3 weeks). Long-term treatment with either Fiber 1 or Fiber 2 significantly increased levels of acetic acid (by 33% and 42%, resp.; both P < 0.01) and butyric acid (62% and P < 0.01 for both), relative to controls (Figure 4). Caecal propionic acid levels were only slightly higher in mice treated with Fiber 2 (26%, P < 0.01). The fibers' similar SCFA profile during long-term treatment suggests that protection in the TNBS colitis model is due to mechanisms specifically associated with Fiber 1, rather than to fermentation processes.


Intrinsic immunomodulatory effects of low-digestible carbohydrates selectively extend their anti-inflammatory prebiotic potentials.

Breton J, Plé C, Guerin-Deremaux L, Pot B, Lefranc-Millot C, Wils D, Foligné B - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Colonic fermentation after 25 days of treatment with the selected fibers: levels of SCFAs (acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid) were measured in the caecal samples of mice from the control, Fiber 1, and Fiber 2 groups after 25 days of treatment. Values are reported in mmol per gram of wet caecal material. ∗∗P < 0.01.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4419225&req=5

fig4: Colonic fermentation after 25 days of treatment with the selected fibers: levels of SCFAs (acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid) were measured in the caecal samples of mice from the control, Fiber 1, and Fiber 2 groups after 25 days of treatment. Values are reported in mmol per gram of wet caecal material. ∗∗P < 0.01.
Mentions: To rule out the possibility that the observed protection against colitis was due to a “standard” prebiotic effect, we measured the production of anti-inflammatory SCFAs (i.e., the cecal SCFA content of mice administered Fiber 1, Fiber 2, or a control saline solution for 3 weeks). Long-term treatment with either Fiber 1 or Fiber 2 significantly increased levels of acetic acid (by 33% and 42%, resp.; both P < 0.01) and butyric acid (62% and P < 0.01 for both), relative to controls (Figure 4). Caecal propionic acid levels were only slightly higher in mice treated with Fiber 2 (26%, P < 0.01). The fibers' similar SCFA profile during long-term treatment suggests that protection in the TNBS colitis model is due to mechanisms specifically associated with Fiber 1, rather than to fermentation processes.

Bottom Line: The immunosuppressive fiber significantly reduced levels of inflammatory markers over both treatment periods, whereas a nonimmunomodulatory fiber had no effect.The two fibers did not differ in terms of the observed fermentation products and colonic microbiota after three weeks of treatment, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory action was not related to prebiotic properties.Hence, we observed a direct effect of a specific fiber on the murine immune system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bactéries Lactiques & Immunité des Muqueuses, Centre d'Infection et d'Immunité de Lille, Institut Pasteur de Lille, U1019, UMR8204, Université Lille Nord de France, 1 rue du Pr Calmette, BP 245, 59019 Lille Cedex, France.

ABSTRACT
The beneficial effects of carbohydrate-derived fibers are mainly attributed to modulation of the microbiota, increased colonic fermentation, and the production of short-chain fatty acids. We studied the direct immune responses to alimentary fibers in in vitro and in vivo models. Firstly, we evaluated the immunomodulation induced by nine different types of low-digestible fibers on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. None of the fibers tested induced cytokine production in baseline conditions. However, only one from all fibers almost completely inhibited the production of anti- and proinflammatory cytokines induced by bacteria. Secondly, the impact of short- (five days) and long-term (three weeks) oral treatments with selected fibers was assessed in the trinitrobenzene-sulfonic acid colitis model in mice. The immunosuppressive fiber significantly reduced levels of inflammatory markers over both treatment periods, whereas a nonimmunomodulatory fiber had no effect. The two fibers did not differ in terms of the observed fermentation products and colonic microbiota after three weeks of treatment, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory action was not related to prebiotic properties. Hence, we observed a direct effect of a specific fiber on the murine immune system. This intrinsic, fiber-dependent immunomodulatory potential may extend prebiotic-mediated protection in inflammatory bowel disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus