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A Model for Creating a Supportive Trauma-Informed Culture for Children in Preschool Settings.

Holmes C, Levy M, Smith A, Pinne S, Neese P - J Child Fam Stud (2015)

Bottom Line: The all too common exposure of young children to traumatic situations and the life-long consequences that can result underscore the need for effective, developmentally appropriate interventions that address complex trauma.This paper describes Head Start Trauma Smart (HSTS), an early education/mental health cross-systems partnership designed to work within the child's natural setting-in this case, Head Start classrooms.Program evaluation findings indicate preliminary support for both the need for identification and intervention and the potential to positively impact key outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Social Welfare, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS USA.

ABSTRACT

The all too common exposure of young children to traumatic situations and the life-long consequences that can result underscore the need for effective, developmentally appropriate interventions that address complex trauma. This paper describes Head Start Trauma Smart (HSTS), an early education/mental health cross-systems partnership designed to work within the child's natural setting-in this case, Head Start classrooms. The goal of HSTS is to decrease the stress of chronic trauma, foster age-appropriate social and cognitive development, and create an integrated, trauma-informed culture for young children, parents, and staff. Created from a community perspective, the HSTS program emphasizes tools and skills that can be applied in everyday settings, thereby providing resources to address current and future trauma. Program evaluation findings indicate preliminary support for both the need for identification and intervention and the potential to positively impact key outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

10 Building blocks for the three ARC core domains
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4419190&req=5

Fig1: 10 Building blocks for the three ARC core domains

Mentions: The Attachment, Self Regulation, and Competency (ARC) framework is a complex trauma-focused intervention/model developed by Blaustein and Kinniburgh (2010) at the Trauma Center at the Justice Resource Institute in Brookline, Massachusetts. It outlines three core domains impacted by exposure to chronic, interpersonal trauma: attachment, self-regulation, and developmental competencies. Within those domains are ten core building blocks of intervention meant to translate across service settings and service delivery format, including non-traditional clinical settings (see Fig. 1). Recent preliminary research shows that the ARC model may hold some promise in improving clinical outcomes for young children exposed to a wide range of traumas (Arvidson et al. 2011). A small sample of children receiving outpatient services based on the ARC framework showed a 19-point improvement on Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) scores compared to a 2.5-point improvement for those who did not complete treatment. The authors do not specify whether this is a statistically significant difference. ARC is listed on the Empirically Supported Treatments and Promising Practices page on the National Child Traumatic Stress Network website. Specific details about the ARC framework provided in 2012 can be found at http://nctsn.org/sites/default/files/assets/pdfs/arc_general.pdf.Fig. 1


A Model for Creating a Supportive Trauma-Informed Culture for Children in Preschool Settings.

Holmes C, Levy M, Smith A, Pinne S, Neese P - J Child Fam Stud (2015)

10 Building blocks for the three ARC core domains
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4419190&req=5

Fig1: 10 Building blocks for the three ARC core domains
Mentions: The Attachment, Self Regulation, and Competency (ARC) framework is a complex trauma-focused intervention/model developed by Blaustein and Kinniburgh (2010) at the Trauma Center at the Justice Resource Institute in Brookline, Massachusetts. It outlines three core domains impacted by exposure to chronic, interpersonal trauma: attachment, self-regulation, and developmental competencies. Within those domains are ten core building blocks of intervention meant to translate across service settings and service delivery format, including non-traditional clinical settings (see Fig. 1). Recent preliminary research shows that the ARC model may hold some promise in improving clinical outcomes for young children exposed to a wide range of traumas (Arvidson et al. 2011). A small sample of children receiving outpatient services based on the ARC framework showed a 19-point improvement on Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) scores compared to a 2.5-point improvement for those who did not complete treatment. The authors do not specify whether this is a statistically significant difference. ARC is listed on the Empirically Supported Treatments and Promising Practices page on the National Child Traumatic Stress Network website. Specific details about the ARC framework provided in 2012 can be found at http://nctsn.org/sites/default/files/assets/pdfs/arc_general.pdf.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The all too common exposure of young children to traumatic situations and the life-long consequences that can result underscore the need for effective, developmentally appropriate interventions that address complex trauma.This paper describes Head Start Trauma Smart (HSTS), an early education/mental health cross-systems partnership designed to work within the child's natural setting-in this case, Head Start classrooms.Program evaluation findings indicate preliminary support for both the need for identification and intervention and the potential to positively impact key outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Social Welfare, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS USA.

ABSTRACT

The all too common exposure of young children to traumatic situations and the life-long consequences that can result underscore the need for effective, developmentally appropriate interventions that address complex trauma. This paper describes Head Start Trauma Smart (HSTS), an early education/mental health cross-systems partnership designed to work within the child's natural setting-in this case, Head Start classrooms. The goal of HSTS is to decrease the stress of chronic trauma, foster age-appropriate social and cognitive development, and create an integrated, trauma-informed culture for young children, parents, and staff. Created from a community perspective, the HSTS program emphasizes tools and skills that can be applied in everyday settings, thereby providing resources to address current and future trauma. Program evaluation findings indicate preliminary support for both the need for identification and intervention and the potential to positively impact key outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus