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Heavy metal bioabsorption capacity of intestinal helminths in urban rats.

Teimoori S, Sabour Yaraghi A, Makki MS, Shahbazi F, Nazmara S, Rokni MB, Mesdaghinia A, Salahi Moghaddam A, Hosseini M, Rakhshanpour A, Mowlavi G - Iran. J. Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: The BF of Cd in M. moniliformis compared to the liver, kidney and muscle of the host was 9.16, 14.14 and 17.09, respectively.High level of absorption in H. diminuta was significantly likewise; the individual BF of Cd and Cr in H. diminuta compared to the liver, kidney and muscle of the hosts was 4.95, 5.94 and 4.67 vs. 2.67, 11.56 and 5.59.The mean concentration of Cd and Cr in C. fasciolaris was also significantly higher than that in the rat livers (P<0.007 and P<0.004, respectively).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Control of Opisthorchiasis (Southeast Asian Liver Fluke Disease), Tropical Disease Research Laboratory, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University , Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand ; 2. Dept. of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences , Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the capability of helminths to absorb heavy metals in comparison with that of the host tissues.

Methods: We compared the concentration of cadmium (Cd) and chromium (Cr) in urban rats and in their harboring helminthes -Moniliformis moniliformis, Hymenolepis diminuta and larval stage of Taenia taenaeiformis (Cysticercus fasciolaris). The heavy metal absorption was evaluated in 1g wet weight of parasites and tissues digested in nitric acid, using Inductivity Coupled Plasma (ICP_OES).

Results: A higher concentration of heavy metals was revealed in the helminths than in the host tissues. Bioconcentration factor (BF= C in parasite/C in tissue) for both Cd and Cr absorption was more than 10-fold higher in M. moniliformis than in the three compared host tissues. The BF of Cd in M. moniliformis compared to the liver, kidney and muscle of the host was 9.16, 14.14 and 17.09, respectively. BF in Cr in the same parasite and the same host tissues ranged from 10.67, 7.06 and 4.6. High level of absorption in H. diminuta was significantly likewise; the individual BF of Cd and Cr in H. diminuta compared to the liver, kidney and muscle of the hosts was 4.95, 5.94 and 4.67 vs. 2.67, 11.56 and 5.59. The mean concentration of Cd and Cr in C. fasciolaris was also significantly higher than that in the rat livers (P<0.007 and P<0.004, respectively).

Conclusion: This study claims that parasites of terrestrial animals exposed to heavy metals can be more accurate indicators than the host tissues as new environmental monitoring agents.

No MeSH data available.


Mean concentrations of Chromium in 3 parasite species and in the host tissue. This figure shows the significant higher absorption of Cd in Moniliformis moniliformis, Hymenolepis diminuta and Cysticercus fasciolaris versus the host tissues
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Figure 2: Mean concentrations of Chromium in 3 parasite species and in the host tissue. This figure shows the significant higher absorption of Cd in Moniliformis moniliformis, Hymenolepis diminuta and Cysticercus fasciolaris versus the host tissues

Mentions: Amongst 60 captured rats, 7 rats not infected with any parasitic worms were concerned as control group. Three parasitic worms, M. moniliformis, H. diminuta and C. fasciolaris, recovered from the intestine of 18 rats regarded as the test group (Table 1). All three parasites and the host tissues of both infected and uninfected rats were analyzed for the concentration of Cd and Cr. The parasites contained higher concentrations of metals than those of the host tissues (Fig. 1 and 2). The bioconcentration factor of Cd in M. moniliformis compared to the liver, kidney and muscle of the host was 9.16, 14.14 and 17.09, respectively. The Cr bioconcentration factor in the same parasite and the same host tissues was 10.67, 7.06 and 4.67, respectively. The bioconcentration factors of Cd and Cr in H. diminuta vs. host tissues revealed a high level of concentration in the worm. The respective bioconcentration factors of Cd and Cr in H. diminuta compared to the liver, kidney and muscle of the hosts was 4.95, 5.94 and 4.67 vs. 2.67, 11.56 and 5.59 (Table 2 and 3). The average concentration of Cd and Cr in C. fasciolaris was significantly higher than that in the host tissues, the rat livers (P<0.007 and P<0.004, respectively). The comparison of absorptive capacity in three species of parasites showed a noticeably high absorption of both heavy metals in acanthocephalan than the two cestodes (Fig. 1 and 2).


Heavy metal bioabsorption capacity of intestinal helminths in urban rats.

Teimoori S, Sabour Yaraghi A, Makki MS, Shahbazi F, Nazmara S, Rokni MB, Mesdaghinia A, Salahi Moghaddam A, Hosseini M, Rakhshanpour A, Mowlavi G - Iran. J. Public Health (2014)

Mean concentrations of Chromium in 3 parasite species and in the host tissue. This figure shows the significant higher absorption of Cd in Moniliformis moniliformis, Hymenolepis diminuta and Cysticercus fasciolaris versus the host tissues
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4419168&req=5

Figure 2: Mean concentrations of Chromium in 3 parasite species and in the host tissue. This figure shows the significant higher absorption of Cd in Moniliformis moniliformis, Hymenolepis diminuta and Cysticercus fasciolaris versus the host tissues
Mentions: Amongst 60 captured rats, 7 rats not infected with any parasitic worms were concerned as control group. Three parasitic worms, M. moniliformis, H. diminuta and C. fasciolaris, recovered from the intestine of 18 rats regarded as the test group (Table 1). All three parasites and the host tissues of both infected and uninfected rats were analyzed for the concentration of Cd and Cr. The parasites contained higher concentrations of metals than those of the host tissues (Fig. 1 and 2). The bioconcentration factor of Cd in M. moniliformis compared to the liver, kidney and muscle of the host was 9.16, 14.14 and 17.09, respectively. The Cr bioconcentration factor in the same parasite and the same host tissues was 10.67, 7.06 and 4.67, respectively. The bioconcentration factors of Cd and Cr in H. diminuta vs. host tissues revealed a high level of concentration in the worm. The respective bioconcentration factors of Cd and Cr in H. diminuta compared to the liver, kidney and muscle of the hosts was 4.95, 5.94 and 4.67 vs. 2.67, 11.56 and 5.59 (Table 2 and 3). The average concentration of Cd and Cr in C. fasciolaris was significantly higher than that in the host tissues, the rat livers (P<0.007 and P<0.004, respectively). The comparison of absorptive capacity in three species of parasites showed a noticeably high absorption of both heavy metals in acanthocephalan than the two cestodes (Fig. 1 and 2).

Bottom Line: The BF of Cd in M. moniliformis compared to the liver, kidney and muscle of the host was 9.16, 14.14 and 17.09, respectively.High level of absorption in H. diminuta was significantly likewise; the individual BF of Cd and Cr in H. diminuta compared to the liver, kidney and muscle of the hosts was 4.95, 5.94 and 4.67 vs. 2.67, 11.56 and 5.59.The mean concentration of Cd and Cr in C. fasciolaris was also significantly higher than that in the rat livers (P<0.007 and P<0.004, respectively).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Control of Opisthorchiasis (Southeast Asian Liver Fluke Disease), Tropical Disease Research Laboratory, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University , Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand ; 2. Dept. of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences , Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the capability of helminths to absorb heavy metals in comparison with that of the host tissues.

Methods: We compared the concentration of cadmium (Cd) and chromium (Cr) in urban rats and in their harboring helminthes -Moniliformis moniliformis, Hymenolepis diminuta and larval stage of Taenia taenaeiformis (Cysticercus fasciolaris). The heavy metal absorption was evaluated in 1g wet weight of parasites and tissues digested in nitric acid, using Inductivity Coupled Plasma (ICP_OES).

Results: A higher concentration of heavy metals was revealed in the helminths than in the host tissues. Bioconcentration factor (BF= C in parasite/C in tissue) for both Cd and Cr absorption was more than 10-fold higher in M. moniliformis than in the three compared host tissues. The BF of Cd in M. moniliformis compared to the liver, kidney and muscle of the host was 9.16, 14.14 and 17.09, respectively. BF in Cr in the same parasite and the same host tissues ranged from 10.67, 7.06 and 4.6. High level of absorption in H. diminuta was significantly likewise; the individual BF of Cd and Cr in H. diminuta compared to the liver, kidney and muscle of the hosts was 4.95, 5.94 and 4.67 vs. 2.67, 11.56 and 5.59. The mean concentration of Cd and Cr in C. fasciolaris was also significantly higher than that in the rat livers (P<0.007 and P<0.004, respectively).

Conclusion: This study claims that parasites of terrestrial animals exposed to heavy metals can be more accurate indicators than the host tissues as new environmental monitoring agents.

No MeSH data available.