Limits...
Developmental predictors of inattention-hyperactivity from pregnancy to early childhood.

Foulon S, Pingault JB, Larroque B, Melchior M, Falissard B, Côté SM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A low family socioeconomic status before pregnancy was the main environmental risk factor for inattention-hyperactivity symptoms at 3 years, and its effect occurred via two pathways.The first was a risk pathway, where lower SES was associated with higher maternal depression and anxiety during pregnancy; then to higher maternal and child distress and dysregulation in infancy; and in turn to higher levels of inattention-hyperactivity at 3 years.The second was a protective pathway, where higher SES was associated with longer duration of breastfeeding during infancy; then to better child neurodevelopmental status in toddlerhood; and in turn to lower levels of inattention-hyperactivity at 3 years.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INSERM U669, University Paris-Descartes and Paris-Sud, Paris, France.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objective of the study was to characterize the developmental sequence of pre- and postnatal risk factors for inattention-hyperactivity symptoms in preschoolers.

Materials and methods: Longitudinal data came from a French population based birth cohort study (EDEN; N = 1311 mother-child pairs followed from the pregnancy onwards). Inattention-hyperactivity symptoms were assessed with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire when participating children were 3 years of age. Potential risk factors were classified in four domains (fetal exposures and child somatic characteristics, child temperament, child neurodevelopmental status, psychosocial environment) and four periods (before pregnancy, prenatal/birth, infancy, toddlerhood). Their role as potential moderator or mediator was tested with path analysis to determine the developmental sequence.

Results: A low family socioeconomic status before pregnancy was the main environmental risk factor for inattention-hyperactivity symptoms at 3 years, and its effect occurred via two pathways. The first was a risk pathway, where lower SES was associated with higher maternal depression and anxiety during pregnancy; then to higher maternal and child distress and dysregulation in infancy; and in turn to higher levels of inattention-hyperactivity at 3 years. The second was a protective pathway, where higher SES was associated with longer duration of breastfeeding during infancy; then to better child neurodevelopmental status in toddlerhood; and in turn to lower levels of inattention-hyperactivity at 3 years.

Discussion: This study identified psychosocial factors at several developmental periods that represent potential targets for preventing the emergence of inattention-hyperactivity symptoms in early childhood.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Longitudinal model of inattention-hyperactivity symptoms emergence (4th step).*Prenatal tobacco and maternal age at birth were proxies of SES. Italicized coefficients are bivariate correlation coefficients. Bold coefficients are standardized path coefficients. A solid arrow indicates a statistical significance (p<0.05) of the multivariate path coefficient A dotted arrow indicates a bivariate significance that disappears in the multivariate model.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4418828&req=5

pone.0125996.g003: Longitudinal model of inattention-hyperactivity symptoms emergence (4th step).*Prenatal tobacco and maternal age at birth were proxies of SES. Italicized coefficients are bivariate correlation coefficients. Bold coefficients are standardized path coefficients. A solid arrow indicates a statistical significance (p<0.05) of the multivariate path coefficient A dotted arrow indicates a bivariate significance that disappears in the multivariate model.

Mentions: When connecting risk factors across time, we identified the mean number of cigarettes smoked during pregnancy and maternal age at birth as proxies of SES and therefore omitted them from further analyses. There was no moderator among the risk factors studied. The developmental sequence with bivariate correlation coefficients and standardized path coefficients between risk factors and the inattention-hyperactivity score is shown in Fig 3. Children from low SES family were more likely to have inattention-hyperactivity symptoms. The effect of this factor was partially mediated by mother’s anxiety and depression during pregnancy, which predicted maternal and child distress and dysregulation in infancy. Male sex was an independent risk factor of inattention-hyperactivity symptoms. To the opposite, a longer breastfeeding duration and a better neurodevelopmental status were associated with fewer inattention-hyperactivity symptoms. The effect of child’s sex and breastfeeding duration were partially mediated by the neurodevelopmental status. The model fitted the data adequately (χ2 = 14.1, df = 8, p-value = 0.08, CFI = 0.98, RMSEA = 0.02, SRMR = 0.024).


Developmental predictors of inattention-hyperactivity from pregnancy to early childhood.

Foulon S, Pingault JB, Larroque B, Melchior M, Falissard B, Côté SM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Longitudinal model of inattention-hyperactivity symptoms emergence (4th step).*Prenatal tobacco and maternal age at birth were proxies of SES. Italicized coefficients are bivariate correlation coefficients. Bold coefficients are standardized path coefficients. A solid arrow indicates a statistical significance (p<0.05) of the multivariate path coefficient A dotted arrow indicates a bivariate significance that disappears in the multivariate model.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4418828&req=5

pone.0125996.g003: Longitudinal model of inattention-hyperactivity symptoms emergence (4th step).*Prenatal tobacco and maternal age at birth were proxies of SES. Italicized coefficients are bivariate correlation coefficients. Bold coefficients are standardized path coefficients. A solid arrow indicates a statistical significance (p<0.05) of the multivariate path coefficient A dotted arrow indicates a bivariate significance that disappears in the multivariate model.
Mentions: When connecting risk factors across time, we identified the mean number of cigarettes smoked during pregnancy and maternal age at birth as proxies of SES and therefore omitted them from further analyses. There was no moderator among the risk factors studied. The developmental sequence with bivariate correlation coefficients and standardized path coefficients between risk factors and the inattention-hyperactivity score is shown in Fig 3. Children from low SES family were more likely to have inattention-hyperactivity symptoms. The effect of this factor was partially mediated by mother’s anxiety and depression during pregnancy, which predicted maternal and child distress and dysregulation in infancy. Male sex was an independent risk factor of inattention-hyperactivity symptoms. To the opposite, a longer breastfeeding duration and a better neurodevelopmental status were associated with fewer inattention-hyperactivity symptoms. The effect of child’s sex and breastfeeding duration were partially mediated by the neurodevelopmental status. The model fitted the data adequately (χ2 = 14.1, df = 8, p-value = 0.08, CFI = 0.98, RMSEA = 0.02, SRMR = 0.024).

Bottom Line: A low family socioeconomic status before pregnancy was the main environmental risk factor for inattention-hyperactivity symptoms at 3 years, and its effect occurred via two pathways.The first was a risk pathway, where lower SES was associated with higher maternal depression and anxiety during pregnancy; then to higher maternal and child distress and dysregulation in infancy; and in turn to higher levels of inattention-hyperactivity at 3 years.The second was a protective pathway, where higher SES was associated with longer duration of breastfeeding during infancy; then to better child neurodevelopmental status in toddlerhood; and in turn to lower levels of inattention-hyperactivity at 3 years.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INSERM U669, University Paris-Descartes and Paris-Sud, Paris, France.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objective of the study was to characterize the developmental sequence of pre- and postnatal risk factors for inattention-hyperactivity symptoms in preschoolers.

Materials and methods: Longitudinal data came from a French population based birth cohort study (EDEN; N = 1311 mother-child pairs followed from the pregnancy onwards). Inattention-hyperactivity symptoms were assessed with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire when participating children were 3 years of age. Potential risk factors were classified in four domains (fetal exposures and child somatic characteristics, child temperament, child neurodevelopmental status, psychosocial environment) and four periods (before pregnancy, prenatal/birth, infancy, toddlerhood). Their role as potential moderator or mediator was tested with path analysis to determine the developmental sequence.

Results: A low family socioeconomic status before pregnancy was the main environmental risk factor for inattention-hyperactivity symptoms at 3 years, and its effect occurred via two pathways. The first was a risk pathway, where lower SES was associated with higher maternal depression and anxiety during pregnancy; then to higher maternal and child distress and dysregulation in infancy; and in turn to higher levels of inattention-hyperactivity at 3 years. The second was a protective pathway, where higher SES was associated with longer duration of breastfeeding during infancy; then to better child neurodevelopmental status in toddlerhood; and in turn to lower levels of inattention-hyperactivity at 3 years.

Discussion: This study identified psychosocial factors at several developmental periods that represent potential targets for preventing the emergence of inattention-hyperactivity symptoms in early childhood.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus