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Does Reproductive Investment Decrease Telomere Length in Menidia menidia?

Gao J, Munch SB - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Given finite resources, intense investment in one life history trait is expected to reduce investment in others.However, we did find that more fecund fish tended to have both reduced life expectancy and shorter telomeres.This result is consistent with the hypothesis that there is a trade-off between telomere maintenance and reproductive output.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Given finite resources, intense investment in one life history trait is expected to reduce investment in others. Although telomere length appears to be strongly tied to age in many taxa, telomere maintenance requires energy. We therefore hypothesize that telomere maintenance may trade off against other life history characters. We used natural variation in laboratory populations of Atlantic silversides (Menidia menidia) to study the relationship between growth, fecundity, life expectancy, and relative telomere length. In keeping with several other studies on fishes, we found no clear dependence of telomere length on age. However, we did find that more fecund fish tended to have both reduced life expectancy and shorter telomeres. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that there is a trade-off between telomere maintenance and reproductive output.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Telomere length through time.The relative telomere length is reported for larvae (age 1 D), females and males from the early breeding period, age 150 days (Early F and Early M respectively), and females and males from late breeding period, 200 days (Late F and Late M respectively). The left panel indicates results for brain tissue and the right panel indicates telomere lengths for muscle. The red line for each box indicates the mean, box edges indicate 25% and 75% percentile, and the whiskers show outlier outside +/-2.7 standard deviation.
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pone.0125674.g001: Telomere length through time.The relative telomere length is reported for larvae (age 1 D), females and males from the early breeding period, age 150 days (Early F and Early M respectively), and females and males from late breeding period, 200 days (Late F and Late M respectively). The left panel indicates results for brain tissue and the right panel indicates telomere lengths for muscle. The red line for each box indicates the mean, box edges indicate 25% and 75% percentile, and the whiskers show outlier outside +/-2.7 standard deviation.

Mentions: In keeping with results for other fishes, there was no clear age-dependent trend in the telomere length (Fig 1) in either brain (♀ slope = -0.0060 +/-0.003 R2 = 0.83, p = 0.61 and ♂ slope = -0.0040+/-0.003 R2 = 0.65, p = 0.45) or muscle (♀slope = 0.000010+/-0.0001 R2 = 0.0040, p = 0.73 and ♂ slope = 0.0020+/-0.02 R2 = 0.50, p = 0.68) tissue. Moreover, no significant differences were found between the males and females at a given age (brain t = 0.72, p = 0.76, muscle t = -0.31, p = 0.38). Although telomeres in muscle were significantly longer than in brain tissue (t = 4.0, p<0.001), they were highly correlated (slope = 0.59+/-0.13, R2 = 0.42, p<0.001, Fig 2). Thus the ample variation among individuals seen in Fig 1 likely represents consistent individual differences in initial telomere length and telomere maintenance rather than measurement noise.


Does Reproductive Investment Decrease Telomere Length in Menidia menidia?

Gao J, Munch SB - PLoS ONE (2015)

Telomere length through time.The relative telomere length is reported for larvae (age 1 D), females and males from the early breeding period, age 150 days (Early F and Early M respectively), and females and males from late breeding period, 200 days (Late F and Late M respectively). The left panel indicates results for brain tissue and the right panel indicates telomere lengths for muscle. The red line for each box indicates the mean, box edges indicate 25% and 75% percentile, and the whiskers show outlier outside +/-2.7 standard deviation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4418813&req=5

pone.0125674.g001: Telomere length through time.The relative telomere length is reported for larvae (age 1 D), females and males from the early breeding period, age 150 days (Early F and Early M respectively), and females and males from late breeding period, 200 days (Late F and Late M respectively). The left panel indicates results for brain tissue and the right panel indicates telomere lengths for muscle. The red line for each box indicates the mean, box edges indicate 25% and 75% percentile, and the whiskers show outlier outside +/-2.7 standard deviation.
Mentions: In keeping with results for other fishes, there was no clear age-dependent trend in the telomere length (Fig 1) in either brain (♀ slope = -0.0060 +/-0.003 R2 = 0.83, p = 0.61 and ♂ slope = -0.0040+/-0.003 R2 = 0.65, p = 0.45) or muscle (♀slope = 0.000010+/-0.0001 R2 = 0.0040, p = 0.73 and ♂ slope = 0.0020+/-0.02 R2 = 0.50, p = 0.68) tissue. Moreover, no significant differences were found between the males and females at a given age (brain t = 0.72, p = 0.76, muscle t = -0.31, p = 0.38). Although telomeres in muscle were significantly longer than in brain tissue (t = 4.0, p<0.001), they were highly correlated (slope = 0.59+/-0.13, R2 = 0.42, p<0.001, Fig 2). Thus the ample variation among individuals seen in Fig 1 likely represents consistent individual differences in initial telomere length and telomere maintenance rather than measurement noise.

Bottom Line: Given finite resources, intense investment in one life history trait is expected to reduce investment in others.However, we did find that more fecund fish tended to have both reduced life expectancy and shorter telomeres.This result is consistent with the hypothesis that there is a trade-off between telomere maintenance and reproductive output.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Given finite resources, intense investment in one life history trait is expected to reduce investment in others. Although telomere length appears to be strongly tied to age in many taxa, telomere maintenance requires energy. We therefore hypothesize that telomere maintenance may trade off against other life history characters. We used natural variation in laboratory populations of Atlantic silversides (Menidia menidia) to study the relationship between growth, fecundity, life expectancy, and relative telomere length. In keeping with several other studies on fishes, we found no clear dependence of telomere length on age. However, we did find that more fecund fish tended to have both reduced life expectancy and shorter telomeres. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that there is a trade-off between telomere maintenance and reproductive output.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus