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Morphological Observations and Fatty Acid Composition of Indoor-Cultivated Cordyceps sinensis at a High-Altitude Laboratory on Sejila Mountain, Tibet.

Guo LX, Xu XM, Liang FR, Yuan JP, Peng J, Wu CF, Wang JH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Their fatty acid composition shows a significant difference in the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs).These observations and fatty acid data suggest that environmental factors, particularly temperature, soil pressure and light intensity, strongly affect the growth of C. sinensis.Our new findings may provide important information for improving techniques for the large-scale artificial cultivation of C. sinensis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Resources and Coastal Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Cordyceps sinensis, a caterpillar entomopathogenic fungus-host larva complex, is a rare medicinal herb found in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and its surrounding high-altitude areas. The alternation of generations in the life cycle, whatever the fungus or its host insect, requires special growth conditions. However, it is difficult to simulate the growth conditions of C. sinensis, which hinders its artificial cultivation. In this work, the life cycle from the host larva to C. sinensis was observed in an indoor-cultivation laboratory at 4,200 m a.s.l. on Sejila Mountain, Tibet. Comparative examinations between indoor-cultivated and wild C. sinensis demonstrated that the indoor-cultivated C. sinensis preferred to germinate multiple long, slim stromata at diverse positions on dead larvae, including but not limited to their heads. Their fatty acid composition shows a significant difference in the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In indoor-cultivated C. sinensis, PUFAs constituted 24.59% and 49.43%, respectively, of neutral and polar lipids; meanwhile, in wild C. sinensis, PUFAs represented 34.34% and 61.25% of neutral and polar lipids, respectively. These observations and fatty acid data suggest that environmental factors, particularly temperature, soil pressure and light intensity, strongly affect the growth of C. sinensis. Our new findings may provide important information for improving techniques for the large-scale artificial cultivation of C. sinensis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Histogram showing the relative abundances of C18:3, C18:2 and total PUFAs in neutral (A) and polar (B) lipids from Cordyceps sinensis.ICS, indoor C. sinensis; WCS, C. sinensis.
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pone.0126095.g005: Histogram showing the relative abundances of C18:3, C18:2 and total PUFAs in neutral (A) and polar (B) lipids from Cordyceps sinensis.ICS, indoor C. sinensis; WCS, C. sinensis.

Mentions: Based on the data in Tables 1 and 2, the data points are joined by lines in Fig 4 to illustrate the specific fatty acid profiles. Fig 4 shows that indoor and wild C. sinensis possessed similar fatty acid profiles in neutral and polar lipids, with two specific peaks at C16:0 and C18:1 in the neutral lipids and two specific peaks at C16:0 and C18:2 in the polar lipids. Furthermore, the levels of C18:2 and C18:3 in the neutral (30.05% and 4.01%) and polar lipids (56.30% and 3.33%) from wild C. sinensis [15] were higher in the wild C. sinensis than in the indoor C. sinensis (23.26% and 1.12% in neutral lipids, and 48.61% and 1.10% in polar lipids, respectively). The distinct differences (P < 0.05) in the levels of C18:2, C18:3 and PUFAs between indoor (PUFAs: 24.59% in neutral and 49.93% in polar lipids) and wild C. sinensis (PUFAs: 34.34% in neutral and 61.25% in polar lipids) are illustrated in Fig 5, showing that three fatty acids among the neutral and polar lipids were much lower in abundance in indoor C. sinensis than in wild C. sinensis [15].


Morphological Observations and Fatty Acid Composition of Indoor-Cultivated Cordyceps sinensis at a High-Altitude Laboratory on Sejila Mountain, Tibet.

Guo LX, Xu XM, Liang FR, Yuan JP, Peng J, Wu CF, Wang JH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Histogram showing the relative abundances of C18:3, C18:2 and total PUFAs in neutral (A) and polar (B) lipids from Cordyceps sinensis.ICS, indoor C. sinensis; WCS, C. sinensis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4418754&req=5

pone.0126095.g005: Histogram showing the relative abundances of C18:3, C18:2 and total PUFAs in neutral (A) and polar (B) lipids from Cordyceps sinensis.ICS, indoor C. sinensis; WCS, C. sinensis.
Mentions: Based on the data in Tables 1 and 2, the data points are joined by lines in Fig 4 to illustrate the specific fatty acid profiles. Fig 4 shows that indoor and wild C. sinensis possessed similar fatty acid profiles in neutral and polar lipids, with two specific peaks at C16:0 and C18:1 in the neutral lipids and two specific peaks at C16:0 and C18:2 in the polar lipids. Furthermore, the levels of C18:2 and C18:3 in the neutral (30.05% and 4.01%) and polar lipids (56.30% and 3.33%) from wild C. sinensis [15] were higher in the wild C. sinensis than in the indoor C. sinensis (23.26% and 1.12% in neutral lipids, and 48.61% and 1.10% in polar lipids, respectively). The distinct differences (P < 0.05) in the levels of C18:2, C18:3 and PUFAs between indoor (PUFAs: 24.59% in neutral and 49.93% in polar lipids) and wild C. sinensis (PUFAs: 34.34% in neutral and 61.25% in polar lipids) are illustrated in Fig 5, showing that three fatty acids among the neutral and polar lipids were much lower in abundance in indoor C. sinensis than in wild C. sinensis [15].

Bottom Line: Their fatty acid composition shows a significant difference in the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs).These observations and fatty acid data suggest that environmental factors, particularly temperature, soil pressure and light intensity, strongly affect the growth of C. sinensis.Our new findings may provide important information for improving techniques for the large-scale artificial cultivation of C. sinensis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Resources and Coastal Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Cordyceps sinensis, a caterpillar entomopathogenic fungus-host larva complex, is a rare medicinal herb found in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and its surrounding high-altitude areas. The alternation of generations in the life cycle, whatever the fungus or its host insect, requires special growth conditions. However, it is difficult to simulate the growth conditions of C. sinensis, which hinders its artificial cultivation. In this work, the life cycle from the host larva to C. sinensis was observed in an indoor-cultivation laboratory at 4,200 m a.s.l. on Sejila Mountain, Tibet. Comparative examinations between indoor-cultivated and wild C. sinensis demonstrated that the indoor-cultivated C. sinensis preferred to germinate multiple long, slim stromata at diverse positions on dead larvae, including but not limited to their heads. Their fatty acid composition shows a significant difference in the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In indoor-cultivated C. sinensis, PUFAs constituted 24.59% and 49.43%, respectively, of neutral and polar lipids; meanwhile, in wild C. sinensis, PUFAs represented 34.34% and 61.25% of neutral and polar lipids, respectively. These observations and fatty acid data suggest that environmental factors, particularly temperature, soil pressure and light intensity, strongly affect the growth of C. sinensis. Our new findings may provide important information for improving techniques for the large-scale artificial cultivation of C. sinensis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus