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Slit-surface electrospinning: a novel process developed for high-throughput fabrication of core-sheath fibers.

Yan X, Marini J, Mulligan R, Deleault A, Sharma U, Brenner MP, Rutledge GC, Freyman T, Pham QP - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Fibers produced in this study were defect-free (i.e. non-beaded) and core-sheath geometry was visually confirmed under scanning electron microscopy.The versatility of our system was demonstrated by fabrication of (1) fibers encapsulating a drug, (2) bicomponent fibers, (3) hollow fibers, and (4) fibers from a polymer that is not normally electrospinnable.The technological achievements demonstrated in this work significantly advance core-sheath electrospinning towards commercial and manufacturing viability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Arsenal Medical, Inc., Watertown, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
In this work, we report on the development of slit-surface electrospinning--a process that co-localizes two solutions along a slit surface to spontaneously emit multiple core-sheath cone-jets at rates of up to 1 L/h. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that production of electrospun core-sheath fibers has been scaled to this magnitude. Fibers produced in this study were defect-free (i.e. non-beaded) and core-sheath geometry was visually confirmed under scanning electron microscopy. The versatility of our system was demonstrated by fabrication of (1) fibers encapsulating a drug, (2) bicomponent fibers, (3) hollow fibers, and (4) fibers from a polymer that is not normally electrospinnable. Additionally, we demonstrate control of the process by modulating parameters such as flow rate, solution viscosity, and fixture design. The technological achievements demonstrated in this work significantly advance core-sheath electrospinning towards commercial and manufacturing viability.

No MeSH data available.


Video capture images of emitted core/sheath cone-jets using System C, whereby different sheath solution viscosities were employed.(a) Distinct core/sheath cone-jets were formed when the sheath solution viscosity was greater than the core solution viscosity. (b) Non-distinct core/sheath cone-jets were formed when the sheath solution viscosity was less than the core solution viscosity.
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pone.0125407.g007: Video capture images of emitted core/sheath cone-jets using System C, whereby different sheath solution viscosities were employed.(a) Distinct core/sheath cone-jets were formed when the sheath solution viscosity was greater than the core solution viscosity. (b) Non-distinct core/sheath cone-jets were formed when the sheath solution viscosity was less than the core solution viscosity.

Mentions: Solution viscosity also had a major impact on the formation of distinct core-sheath cone-jets. In this experiment, we used System C in which the sheath solution viscosity was either 280 cP or 760 cP, corresponding to PCL solutions with concentrations of 12 wt% or 16 wt%. The viscosity of the core solution was constant at 500 cP. In this experiment, the 2.2 mm wide sheath slit was used for both sheath solutions, and the flow rates were set at 200 and 20 mL/h for the sheath and core solutions, respectively. It was found that the core-sheath formation and morphology of the cone-jets was more distinct when 16 wt% PCL was used as the sheath solution, even though the same flow rates were used (Fig 7). We hypothesize that this results from the higher sheath viscosity, which provides a shear force sufficient to entrain the core solution. In contrast, the 12 wt% PCL solution has a viscosity lower than that of the core solution (280 cP < 500 cP) and does not exhibit distinct core-sheath cone-jet formation. (Note: Both conditions shown here met the conditions of sheath flow velocity being greater than core flow velocity as described in the previous section). Again, as before, we believe that this result highlights the importance of the selective withdrawal mechanism in which a sufficient shear stress is required for proper entrainment of the core material for distinct core-sheath cone-jet formation.


Slit-surface electrospinning: a novel process developed for high-throughput fabrication of core-sheath fibers.

Yan X, Marini J, Mulligan R, Deleault A, Sharma U, Brenner MP, Rutledge GC, Freyman T, Pham QP - PLoS ONE (2015)

Video capture images of emitted core/sheath cone-jets using System C, whereby different sheath solution viscosities were employed.(a) Distinct core/sheath cone-jets were formed when the sheath solution viscosity was greater than the core solution viscosity. (b) Non-distinct core/sheath cone-jets were formed when the sheath solution viscosity was less than the core solution viscosity.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4418707&req=5

pone.0125407.g007: Video capture images of emitted core/sheath cone-jets using System C, whereby different sheath solution viscosities were employed.(a) Distinct core/sheath cone-jets were formed when the sheath solution viscosity was greater than the core solution viscosity. (b) Non-distinct core/sheath cone-jets were formed when the sheath solution viscosity was less than the core solution viscosity.
Mentions: Solution viscosity also had a major impact on the formation of distinct core-sheath cone-jets. In this experiment, we used System C in which the sheath solution viscosity was either 280 cP or 760 cP, corresponding to PCL solutions with concentrations of 12 wt% or 16 wt%. The viscosity of the core solution was constant at 500 cP. In this experiment, the 2.2 mm wide sheath slit was used for both sheath solutions, and the flow rates were set at 200 and 20 mL/h for the sheath and core solutions, respectively. It was found that the core-sheath formation and morphology of the cone-jets was more distinct when 16 wt% PCL was used as the sheath solution, even though the same flow rates were used (Fig 7). We hypothesize that this results from the higher sheath viscosity, which provides a shear force sufficient to entrain the core solution. In contrast, the 12 wt% PCL solution has a viscosity lower than that of the core solution (280 cP < 500 cP) and does not exhibit distinct core-sheath cone-jet formation. (Note: Both conditions shown here met the conditions of sheath flow velocity being greater than core flow velocity as described in the previous section). Again, as before, we believe that this result highlights the importance of the selective withdrawal mechanism in which a sufficient shear stress is required for proper entrainment of the core material for distinct core-sheath cone-jet formation.

Bottom Line: Fibers produced in this study were defect-free (i.e. non-beaded) and core-sheath geometry was visually confirmed under scanning electron microscopy.The versatility of our system was demonstrated by fabrication of (1) fibers encapsulating a drug, (2) bicomponent fibers, (3) hollow fibers, and (4) fibers from a polymer that is not normally electrospinnable.The technological achievements demonstrated in this work significantly advance core-sheath electrospinning towards commercial and manufacturing viability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Arsenal Medical, Inc., Watertown, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
In this work, we report on the development of slit-surface electrospinning--a process that co-localizes two solutions along a slit surface to spontaneously emit multiple core-sheath cone-jets at rates of up to 1 L/h. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that production of electrospun core-sheath fibers has been scaled to this magnitude. Fibers produced in this study were defect-free (i.e. non-beaded) and core-sheath geometry was visually confirmed under scanning electron microscopy. The versatility of our system was demonstrated by fabrication of (1) fibers encapsulating a drug, (2) bicomponent fibers, (3) hollow fibers, and (4) fibers from a polymer that is not normally electrospinnable. Additionally, we demonstrate control of the process by modulating parameters such as flow rate, solution viscosity, and fixture design. The technological achievements demonstrated in this work significantly advance core-sheath electrospinning towards commercial and manufacturing viability.

No MeSH data available.