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Improving methods to evaluate the impacts of plant invasions: lessons from 40 years of research.

Stricker KB, Hagan D, Flory SL - AoB Plants (2015)

Bottom Line: Most of the studies were temporally and spatially restricted with 51 % of studies lasting <1 year and almost half of all studies conducted in plots or mesocosms <1 m(2).There was also a bias in life form studied: more than 60 % of all studies evaluated impacts of invasive forbs and graminoids while <16 % focused on invasive trees.Combining broad-scale observational studies with experiments and predictive modelling may provide the most insight into invasion impacts for policy makers and land managers seeking to reduce the effects of plant invasions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Agronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of observational, experimental removal, experimental addition and modelling studies that evaluated the impacts of invasions on different groups of organisms or ecosystem processes.
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PLV028F5: Number of observational, experimental removal, experimental addition and modelling studies that evaluated the impacts of invasions on different groups of organisms or ecosystem processes.

Mentions: We also found significant differences in study approaches used to assess the impacts of invasive plants on different impacted groups (χ2 = 33.1, P = 0.002; Fig. 5). The majority (60.6 %) of plant invasion impact studies have focused on their effects on other plants, 12 % on invertebrates, 8.2 % on ecosystem effects, 6.3 % on vertebrates and only 5.5 % on microbes. The number of studies that evaluated the impacts of invasive plants on other plants was significantly greater than the number of studies evaluating plant invasion impacts on ecosystem processes (χ2 = 13.3, P = 0.006; Bonferroni-corrected α = 0.017). Of the studies that evaluated the impacts of invasions on other plants, nearly half of the studies used observational methods while 23 % used experimental removal and 25 % experimental addition. In contrast, more than 77 % of the studies on ecosystem effects used observational methods and few used experimental removal (8.5 %) or addition (12.8 %). Similarly, over 60 % of studies that quantified the effects of invasions on invertebrates, vertebrates and microbes used observational methods. A total of 77 studies have simultaneously evaluated multiple groups, most commonly plants and ecosystem effects (38 studies) and plants and invertebrates (11 studies).Figure 5.


Improving methods to evaluate the impacts of plant invasions: lessons from 40 years of research.

Stricker KB, Hagan D, Flory SL - AoB Plants (2015)

Number of observational, experimental removal, experimental addition and modelling studies that evaluated the impacts of invasions on different groups of organisms or ecosystem processes.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4418169&req=5

PLV028F5: Number of observational, experimental removal, experimental addition and modelling studies that evaluated the impacts of invasions on different groups of organisms or ecosystem processes.
Mentions: We also found significant differences in study approaches used to assess the impacts of invasive plants on different impacted groups (χ2 = 33.1, P = 0.002; Fig. 5). The majority (60.6 %) of plant invasion impact studies have focused on their effects on other plants, 12 % on invertebrates, 8.2 % on ecosystem effects, 6.3 % on vertebrates and only 5.5 % on microbes. The number of studies that evaluated the impacts of invasive plants on other plants was significantly greater than the number of studies evaluating plant invasion impacts on ecosystem processes (χ2 = 13.3, P = 0.006; Bonferroni-corrected α = 0.017). Of the studies that evaluated the impacts of invasions on other plants, nearly half of the studies used observational methods while 23 % used experimental removal and 25 % experimental addition. In contrast, more than 77 % of the studies on ecosystem effects used observational methods and few used experimental removal (8.5 %) or addition (12.8 %). Similarly, over 60 % of studies that quantified the effects of invasions on invertebrates, vertebrates and microbes used observational methods. A total of 77 studies have simultaneously evaluated multiple groups, most commonly plants and ecosystem effects (38 studies) and plants and invertebrates (11 studies).Figure 5.

Bottom Line: Most of the studies were temporally and spatially restricted with 51 % of studies lasting <1 year and almost half of all studies conducted in plots or mesocosms <1 m(2).There was also a bias in life form studied: more than 60 % of all studies evaluated impacts of invasive forbs and graminoids while <16 % focused on invasive trees.Combining broad-scale observational studies with experiments and predictive modelling may provide the most insight into invasion impacts for policy makers and land managers seeking to reduce the effects of plant invasions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Agronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus