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Improving methods to evaluate the impacts of plant invasions: lessons from 40 years of research.

Stricker KB, Hagan D, Flory SL - AoB Plants (2015)

Bottom Line: Most of the studies were temporally and spatially restricted with 51 % of studies lasting <1 year and almost half of all studies conducted in plots or mesocosms <1 m(2).There was also a bias in life form studied: more than 60 % of all studies evaluated impacts of invasive forbs and graminoids while <16 % focused on invasive trees.Combining broad-scale observational studies with experiments and predictive modelling may provide the most insight into invasion impacts for policy makers and land managers seeking to reduce the effects of plant invasions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Agronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of studies conducted on invasive graminoids, forbs, shrubs and trees during 1971–2011.
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PLV028F4: Number of studies conducted on invasive graminoids, forbs, shrubs and trees during 1971–2011.

Mentions: From 1990 to 2011, there was a significant exponential increase in the number of studies conducted on the impacts of invasive plants across all functional groups (F1,76 = 120.5, P < 0.001; Fig. 4). There was little difference among functional groups until 1990, as few studies were conducted on plant invasion impacts prior to that year, but in the following years there were significant differences among functional groups (F3,76 = 3.48, P = 0.020), with more studies conducted on invasive graminoids and forbs than on shrubs (P = 0.03, P = 0.05, respectively). None of the other differences among functional groups were significant. From 2000 to 2011, when the vast majority (84 %) of all invasion impact studies were published, more than 52 % of studies were conducted on herbaceous species. During the same time period, there were on average 5.5 studies per year on invasive trees but more than 11.5 studies per year on forbs and 13.6 per year on invasive graminoids.Figure 4.


Improving methods to evaluate the impacts of plant invasions: lessons from 40 years of research.

Stricker KB, Hagan D, Flory SL - AoB Plants (2015)

Number of studies conducted on invasive graminoids, forbs, shrubs and trees during 1971–2011.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4418169&req=5

PLV028F4: Number of studies conducted on invasive graminoids, forbs, shrubs and trees during 1971–2011.
Mentions: From 1990 to 2011, there was a significant exponential increase in the number of studies conducted on the impacts of invasive plants across all functional groups (F1,76 = 120.5, P < 0.001; Fig. 4). There was little difference among functional groups until 1990, as few studies were conducted on plant invasion impacts prior to that year, but in the following years there were significant differences among functional groups (F3,76 = 3.48, P = 0.020), with more studies conducted on invasive graminoids and forbs than on shrubs (P = 0.03, P = 0.05, respectively). None of the other differences among functional groups were significant. From 2000 to 2011, when the vast majority (84 %) of all invasion impact studies were published, more than 52 % of studies were conducted on herbaceous species. During the same time period, there were on average 5.5 studies per year on invasive trees but more than 11.5 studies per year on forbs and 13.6 per year on invasive graminoids.Figure 4.

Bottom Line: Most of the studies were temporally and spatially restricted with 51 % of studies lasting <1 year and almost half of all studies conducted in plots or mesocosms <1 m(2).There was also a bias in life form studied: more than 60 % of all studies evaluated impacts of invasive forbs and graminoids while <16 % focused on invasive trees.Combining broad-scale observational studies with experiments and predictive modelling may provide the most insight into invasion impacts for policy makers and land managers seeking to reduce the effects of plant invasions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Agronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus