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Association between epidermal growth factor gene +61A/G polymorphism and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: a meta-analysis based on 16 studies.

Jiang G, Yu K, Shao L, Yu X, Hu C, Qian P, Xie H, Li J, Zheng J, Zheng S - BMC Cancer (2015)

Bottom Line: In the subgroup analyses by ethnicity, a significant association with HCC risk was found in Asian populations (G vs.Our study shows that EGF +61A/G polymorphism is significantly associated with the increased HCC risk, especially in Asian populations.Further large-scale and well-designed studies are required to confirm this conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 79 Qingchun Rd, Hangzhou, 310003, China. jiangguoping@zju.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT

Background: The association between epidermal growth factor (EGF) gene +61A/G polymorphism (rs4444903) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) susceptibility has been widely reported, but the results were inconsistent. To clarify the effect of this polymorphism on HCC risk, a meta-analysis was performed.

Methods: The PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Chinese BioMedical Literature (CBM), Wanfang and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases were systematically searched to identify relevant studies published up to December 2013. Data were extracted independently by two authors. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated to assess the strength of association.

Results: A total of 16 studies including 2475 HCC cases and 5381 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, a significantly increased HCC risk was observed under all genetic models (G vs. A: OR = 1.383, P < 0.001, 95% CI: 1.174-1.629; GG vs. GA + AA: OR = 1.484, P < 0.001, 95% CI: 1.198-1.838; GG + GA vs. AA: OR = 1.530, P < 0.001, 95% CI: 1.217-1.924; GG vs. AA: OR = 1.958, P < 0.001, 95% CI: 1.433-2.675; GA vs. AA: OR = 1.215, P = 0.013, 95% CI: 1.041-1.418). In the subgroup analyses by ethnicity, a significant association with HCC risk was found in Asian populations (G vs. A: OR = 1.151, P = 0.001, 95% CI: 1.056-1.255), European populations (G vs. A: OR = 1.594, P = 0.027, 95% CI: 1.053-2.413, and African populations (G vs. A: OR = 3.599, P < 0.001, 95% CI: 2.550-5.080), respectively.

Conclusions: Our study shows that EGF +61A/G polymorphism is significantly associated with the increased HCC risk, especially in Asian populations. Further large-scale and well-designed studies are required to confirm this conclusion.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram of the study selection process.
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Fig1: Flow diagram of the study selection process.

Mentions: The present study met the PRISMA statement (Additional file 2: Checklist S1). A total of 413 potentially relevant records were initially obtained through searching the databases. After removing 127 duplications, 241 records were excluded because of obvious irrelevance to our study aim by browsing the titles and abstracts. According to the inclusion criteria, 32 of the remaining 45 records were further excluded by review of the full texts. The flow chart of the selection process was shown in Figure 1. In total, 13 articles were eligible, of which three provided the data in different populations [12,13,26]. We treated each population as a separate study. As a result, 16 studies (13 articles) including 2475 HCC cases and 5381 controls were identified and included in this meta-analysis [12-16,26-33].Figure 1


Association between epidermal growth factor gene +61A/G polymorphism and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: a meta-analysis based on 16 studies.

Jiang G, Yu K, Shao L, Yu X, Hu C, Qian P, Xie H, Li J, Zheng J, Zheng S - BMC Cancer (2015)

Flow diagram of the study selection process.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4418097&req=5

Fig1: Flow diagram of the study selection process.
Mentions: The present study met the PRISMA statement (Additional file 2: Checklist S1). A total of 413 potentially relevant records were initially obtained through searching the databases. After removing 127 duplications, 241 records were excluded because of obvious irrelevance to our study aim by browsing the titles and abstracts. According to the inclusion criteria, 32 of the remaining 45 records were further excluded by review of the full texts. The flow chart of the selection process was shown in Figure 1. In total, 13 articles were eligible, of which three provided the data in different populations [12,13,26]. We treated each population as a separate study. As a result, 16 studies (13 articles) including 2475 HCC cases and 5381 controls were identified and included in this meta-analysis [12-16,26-33].Figure 1

Bottom Line: In the subgroup analyses by ethnicity, a significant association with HCC risk was found in Asian populations (G vs.Our study shows that EGF +61A/G polymorphism is significantly associated with the increased HCC risk, especially in Asian populations.Further large-scale and well-designed studies are required to confirm this conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 79 Qingchun Rd, Hangzhou, 310003, China. jiangguoping@zju.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT

Background: The association between epidermal growth factor (EGF) gene +61A/G polymorphism (rs4444903) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) susceptibility has been widely reported, but the results were inconsistent. To clarify the effect of this polymorphism on HCC risk, a meta-analysis was performed.

Methods: The PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Chinese BioMedical Literature (CBM), Wanfang and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases were systematically searched to identify relevant studies published up to December 2013. Data were extracted independently by two authors. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated to assess the strength of association.

Results: A total of 16 studies including 2475 HCC cases and 5381 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, a significantly increased HCC risk was observed under all genetic models (G vs. A: OR = 1.383, P < 0.001, 95% CI: 1.174-1.629; GG vs. GA + AA: OR = 1.484, P < 0.001, 95% CI: 1.198-1.838; GG + GA vs. AA: OR = 1.530, P < 0.001, 95% CI: 1.217-1.924; GG vs. AA: OR = 1.958, P < 0.001, 95% CI: 1.433-2.675; GA vs. AA: OR = 1.215, P = 0.013, 95% CI: 1.041-1.418). In the subgroup analyses by ethnicity, a significant association with HCC risk was found in Asian populations (G vs. A: OR = 1.151, P = 0.001, 95% CI: 1.056-1.255), European populations (G vs. A: OR = 1.594, P = 0.027, 95% CI: 1.053-2.413, and African populations (G vs. A: OR = 3.599, P < 0.001, 95% CI: 2.550-5.080), respectively.

Conclusions: Our study shows that EGF +61A/G polymorphism is significantly associated with the increased HCC risk, especially in Asian populations. Further large-scale and well-designed studies are required to confirm this conclusion.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus