Limits...
Antidiarrheal activity and acute oral toxicity of Mentha longifolia L. essential oil.

Jalilzadeh-Amin G, Maham M - Avicenna J Phytomed (2015 Mar-Apr)

Bottom Line: EOML caused a significant (p<0.05) and dose-dependent decrease of gastrointestinal transit, nevertheless, it could not block the inhibitory effect of atropine (0.1 mg/kg).EOML decreased the intestinal fluid accumulation as indicated by the significantly (p<0.05 to p<0.001) decrease compared to control.The oral LD50 of EOML was found to be 470 mg/kg in rat.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Urmia University, Urmia, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Mentha longifolia L. (Lamiaceae) is an annual herb that is used in the Iranian traditional medicine for treating stomach and intestinal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effect of M. longifolia on experimental diarrhea in a rat model.

Materials and methods: The antidiarrheal activity of essential oil of M. longifolia (20-80 mg/kg) was investigated against castor oil-induced diarrhea in rats using loperamide as the standard reference drug. In acute toxicity evaluation, rats were orally administrated with single dose of EOML at doses ranging from 10 to 1000 mg/kg.

Results: EOML caused a significant (p<0.05) and dose-dependent decrease of gastrointestinal transit, nevertheless, it could not block the inhibitory effect of atropine (0.1 mg/kg). EOML at oral doses of 20 and 80 mg/kg protected the animals against castor oil-induced diarrhea significantly (p<0.05). EOML decreased the intestinal fluid accumulation as indicated by the significantly (p<0.05 to p<0.001) decrease compared to control. The oral LD50 of EOML was found to be 470 mg/kg in rat.

Conclusion: Since the inhibition of intestinal hyperactivity and hypersecretory are the bases of the treatment of diarrhea, results obtained in the present study suggest that EOML is endowed with antidiarrheal activity. EOML is moderately toxic for oral medication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of Menthe longifolia essential oil (MLEO) and atropine on the upper gastrointestinal transit of charcoal meal in normal rat. Results are expressed as mean±SEM; n=6 in each group. Data were analyzed by one way ANOVA followed by Dunnet’s multiple comparisons test. *p<0.05 when compared to control group.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4418062&req=5

Figure 1: Effect of Menthe longifolia essential oil (MLEO) and atropine on the upper gastrointestinal transit of charcoal meal in normal rat. Results are expressed as mean±SEM; n=6 in each group. Data were analyzed by one way ANOVA followed by Dunnet’s multiple comparisons test. *p<0.05 when compared to control group.

Mentions: In the treated groups, EOML (20-80 mg/kg, p.o.) dose-dependently and significantly (P<0.05) decreased the normal intestinal propulsive movement and transit of charcoal meal through the small intestine. Atropine (0.1 mg/kg, p.o.) as a standard antispasmodic drug produced greater antimotility effect than the lower dose of EOML at doses of 20-40 mg/kg p.o. EOML at 60 mg/kg showed inhibitory effect (32.43%) equal with atropine group (Figure 1).


Antidiarrheal activity and acute oral toxicity of Mentha longifolia L. essential oil.

Jalilzadeh-Amin G, Maham M - Avicenna J Phytomed (2015 Mar-Apr)

Effect of Menthe longifolia essential oil (MLEO) and atropine on the upper gastrointestinal transit of charcoal meal in normal rat. Results are expressed as mean±SEM; n=6 in each group. Data were analyzed by one way ANOVA followed by Dunnet’s multiple comparisons test. *p<0.05 when compared to control group.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4418062&req=5

Figure 1: Effect of Menthe longifolia essential oil (MLEO) and atropine on the upper gastrointestinal transit of charcoal meal in normal rat. Results are expressed as mean±SEM; n=6 in each group. Data were analyzed by one way ANOVA followed by Dunnet’s multiple comparisons test. *p<0.05 when compared to control group.
Mentions: In the treated groups, EOML (20-80 mg/kg, p.o.) dose-dependently and significantly (P<0.05) decreased the normal intestinal propulsive movement and transit of charcoal meal through the small intestine. Atropine (0.1 mg/kg, p.o.) as a standard antispasmodic drug produced greater antimotility effect than the lower dose of EOML at doses of 20-40 mg/kg p.o. EOML at 60 mg/kg showed inhibitory effect (32.43%) equal with atropine group (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: EOML caused a significant (p<0.05) and dose-dependent decrease of gastrointestinal transit, nevertheless, it could not block the inhibitory effect of atropine (0.1 mg/kg).EOML decreased the intestinal fluid accumulation as indicated by the significantly (p<0.05 to p<0.001) decrease compared to control.The oral LD50 of EOML was found to be 470 mg/kg in rat.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Urmia University, Urmia, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Mentha longifolia L. (Lamiaceae) is an annual herb that is used in the Iranian traditional medicine for treating stomach and intestinal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effect of M. longifolia on experimental diarrhea in a rat model.

Materials and methods: The antidiarrheal activity of essential oil of M. longifolia (20-80 mg/kg) was investigated against castor oil-induced diarrhea in rats using loperamide as the standard reference drug. In acute toxicity evaluation, rats were orally administrated with single dose of EOML at doses ranging from 10 to 1000 mg/kg.

Results: EOML caused a significant (p<0.05) and dose-dependent decrease of gastrointestinal transit, nevertheless, it could not block the inhibitory effect of atropine (0.1 mg/kg). EOML at oral doses of 20 and 80 mg/kg protected the animals against castor oil-induced diarrhea significantly (p<0.05). EOML decreased the intestinal fluid accumulation as indicated by the significantly (p<0.05 to p<0.001) decrease compared to control. The oral LD50 of EOML was found to be 470 mg/kg in rat.

Conclusion: Since the inhibition of intestinal hyperactivity and hypersecretory are the bases of the treatment of diarrhea, results obtained in the present study suggest that EOML is endowed with antidiarrheal activity. EOML is moderately toxic for oral medication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus