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The effects of bromocriptine on preventing postpartum flare in systemic lupus erythematosus patients from South China.

Qian Q, Liuqin L, Hao L, Shiwen Y, Zhongping Z, Dongying C, Fan L, Hanshi X, Xiuyan Y, Yujin Y - J Immunol Res (2015)

Bottom Line: All the patients were followed up for 12 months.Clinical features were recorded every 4 weeks.Two weeks of oral bromocriptine treatment in postpartum SLE patients may relieve the disease from hyperprolactinemia and hyperestrogenemia and may be beneficial in preventing the patients from disease relapse.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rheumatology & Clinical Immunology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Prolactin plays an important role on the disease flare of postpartum SLE patients. 76 pregnant SLE patients were enrolled in this study to evaluate the efficacy of bromocriptine (an inhibitor of prolactin secretion) on preventing the postpartum disease relapse.

Methods: Patients were randomly divided into the treatment group (bromocriptine, 2.5 mg oral, twice a day for 14 days after delivery) and the control group. All the patients were followed up for 12 months. Clinical features were recorded every 4 weeks. Serum prolactin and estradiol levels were measured at the second week and the second month after delivery. The endpoint of the study was disease relapse and defined when SLEDAI score increased by ≥3 points from the antenatal baseline.

Results: (1) Serum levels of prolactin and estradiol decreased significantly in bromocriptine treatment group at the second week (P < 0.001) and second month (P < 0.05) after delivery compared to control group. (2) The relapse rate of the treatment group was lower than the control group (χ (2) = 4.68, P = 0.0305).

Conclusions: Two weeks of oral bromocriptine treatment in postpartum SLE patients may relieve the disease from hyperprolactinemia and hyperestrogenemia and may be beneficial in preventing the patients from disease relapse.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan-Meier survival curves for relapse-free Survival between the treatment group and the control group.
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fig2: Kaplan-Meier survival curves for relapse-free Survival between the treatment group and the control group.

Mentions: Twenty pregnant patients experienced 20 flares within 12-month follow-up after delivery. Fifteen cases were mild/moderate flares and five were severe flares. Analysis of flares of any type (mild/moderate or severe) by Kaplan-Meier survival curves found that 6 patients (15.7%) in bromocriptine group and 14 cases (36.8%) in control group experienced at least 1 flare. Log-rank test indicated that there was significant difference on the flare rate between the treatment group and control group (χ2 = 4.68, P = 0.0305) (shown in Figure 2). Relative risk reduction (RRR) was 68.8% and the 95% confidence interval (CI) was 24.3%–87.1%. Absolute risk reduction (ARR) was 32.4% and the 95%CI was 11.8%–53%. The number needed to treat (NTT) was 3.1, 95%CI (1.9–8.5), which means 3.1 patients needed to be treated to protect one patient from relapse. All severe flares occurred in the control group.


The effects of bromocriptine on preventing postpartum flare in systemic lupus erythematosus patients from South China.

Qian Q, Liuqin L, Hao L, Shiwen Y, Zhongping Z, Dongying C, Fan L, Hanshi X, Xiuyan Y, Yujin Y - J Immunol Res (2015)

Kaplan-Meier survival curves for relapse-free Survival between the treatment group and the control group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4418009&req=5

fig2: Kaplan-Meier survival curves for relapse-free Survival between the treatment group and the control group.
Mentions: Twenty pregnant patients experienced 20 flares within 12-month follow-up after delivery. Fifteen cases were mild/moderate flares and five were severe flares. Analysis of flares of any type (mild/moderate or severe) by Kaplan-Meier survival curves found that 6 patients (15.7%) in bromocriptine group and 14 cases (36.8%) in control group experienced at least 1 flare. Log-rank test indicated that there was significant difference on the flare rate between the treatment group and control group (χ2 = 4.68, P = 0.0305) (shown in Figure 2). Relative risk reduction (RRR) was 68.8% and the 95% confidence interval (CI) was 24.3%–87.1%. Absolute risk reduction (ARR) was 32.4% and the 95%CI was 11.8%–53%. The number needed to treat (NTT) was 3.1, 95%CI (1.9–8.5), which means 3.1 patients needed to be treated to protect one patient from relapse. All severe flares occurred in the control group.

Bottom Line: All the patients were followed up for 12 months.Clinical features were recorded every 4 weeks.Two weeks of oral bromocriptine treatment in postpartum SLE patients may relieve the disease from hyperprolactinemia and hyperestrogenemia and may be beneficial in preventing the patients from disease relapse.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rheumatology & Clinical Immunology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Prolactin plays an important role on the disease flare of postpartum SLE patients. 76 pregnant SLE patients were enrolled in this study to evaluate the efficacy of bromocriptine (an inhibitor of prolactin secretion) on preventing the postpartum disease relapse.

Methods: Patients were randomly divided into the treatment group (bromocriptine, 2.5 mg oral, twice a day for 14 days after delivery) and the control group. All the patients were followed up for 12 months. Clinical features were recorded every 4 weeks. Serum prolactin and estradiol levels were measured at the second week and the second month after delivery. The endpoint of the study was disease relapse and defined when SLEDAI score increased by ≥3 points from the antenatal baseline.

Results: (1) Serum levels of prolactin and estradiol decreased significantly in bromocriptine treatment group at the second week (P < 0.001) and second month (P < 0.05) after delivery compared to control group. (2) The relapse rate of the treatment group was lower than the control group (χ (2) = 4.68, P = 0.0305).

Conclusions: Two weeks of oral bromocriptine treatment in postpartum SLE patients may relieve the disease from hyperprolactinemia and hyperestrogenemia and may be beneficial in preventing the patients from disease relapse.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus