Limits...
Influence of different shellfish matrices on the separation of PSP toxins using a postcolumn oxidation liquid chromatography method.

Rey V, Alfonso A, Botana LM, Botana AM - Toxins (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: The matrix peaks are not always the same, which is a significant issue when it comes to producing good, reliable results regarding resolution and toxicity information.Scallop and oyster matrices needed a decrease in the concentration of heptane sulfonate to separate GTX4 from matrix peaks, as well as dcGTX3 for oysters, with a concentration of 6.5 mM for solvent A and 6.25 mM for solvent B.Also, for scallops and oysters, matrix interferences depend not only on the sampling site but also on the date of collection as well as the species; for mussels and clams, differences are noted only when the sampling site varies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Analytical Chemistry, Science Faculty, University of Santiago de Compostela, Lugo 27002, Spain. veronica.rey@rai.usc.es.

ABSTRACT
The separation of PSP toxins using liquid chromatography with a post-column oxidation fluorescence detection method was performed with different matrices. The separation of PSP toxins depends on several factors, and it is crucial to take into account the presence of interfering matrix peaks to produce a good separation. The matrix peaks are not always the same, which is a significant issue when it comes to producing good, reliable results regarding resolution and toxicity information. Different real shellfish matrices (mussel, scallop, clam and oyster) were studied, and it was seen that the interference is not the same for each individual matrix. It also depends on the species, sampling location and the date of collection. It was proposed that separation should be accomplished taking into account the type of matrix, as well as the concentration of heptane sulfonate in both solvents, since the mobile phase varies regarding the matrix. Scallop and oyster matrices needed a decrease in the concentration of heptane sulfonate to separate GTX4 from matrix peaks, as well as dcGTX3 for oysters, with a concentration of 6.5 mM for solvent A and 6.25 mM for solvent B. For mussel and clam matrices, interfering peaks are not as large as they are in the other group, and the heptane sulfonate concentration was 8.25 mM for both solvents. Also, for scallops and oysters, matrix interferences depend not only on the sampling site but also on the date of collection as well as the species; for mussels and clams, differences are noted only when the sampling site varies.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Scallop PSP toxin-free with 11 mM heptane sulfonate in mobile phase; (b) GTX4 and GTX1 in scallop tissue with 11 mM heptane sulfonate in mobile phase; (c) PSP toxins standards in scallop tissue with 6.5 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent A and 6.25 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent B; (d) PSP toxins standards in oyster tissue with 6.5 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent A and 6.25 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent B.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4417969&req=5

toxins-07-01324-f003: (a) Scallop PSP toxin-free with 11 mM heptane sulfonate in mobile phase; (b) GTX4 and GTX1 in scallop tissue with 11 mM heptane sulfonate in mobile phase; (c) PSP toxins standards in scallop tissue with 6.5 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent A and 6.25 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent B; (d) PSP toxins standards in oyster tissue with 6.5 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent A and 6.25 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent B.

Mentions: It was found that the behavior of PSP toxins in mussels and clams is similar. The same conditions were used for these two shellfish. As mentioned, the concentration of heptane sulfonate for both solvents in order to get a good resolution was 8.25 mM in all cases. However, one scallop matrix peak coeluted with GTX4; to separate them heptane sulfonate concentration was changed in solvent A, with 6.5 mM being the appropriate concentration. When oyster was studied the same problem was found as in the case of the scallop, namely that GTX4 coeluted with a matrix peak and also another peak coeluted with dcGTX3. Therefore, the heptane sulfonate concentration was modified to 6.5 mM in solvent A and to 6.25 mM in solvent B, although the separation between dcGTX3 and the matrix peak was not optimal. Figure 3 shows the chromatograms of (a) a toxin-free scallop tissue, where it is possible to see the matrix peak for a 11 mM heptane sulfonate concentration; (b) the overlapping of GTX4 and that peak at that concentration; and finally, (c) the separation of both peaks, when the concentration of heptane sulfonate was changed. The chromatogram in (d) shows the separation obtained for oyster.


Influence of different shellfish matrices on the separation of PSP toxins using a postcolumn oxidation liquid chromatography method.

Rey V, Alfonso A, Botana LM, Botana AM - Toxins (Basel) (2015)

(a) Scallop PSP toxin-free with 11 mM heptane sulfonate in mobile phase; (b) GTX4 and GTX1 in scallop tissue with 11 mM heptane sulfonate in mobile phase; (c) PSP toxins standards in scallop tissue with 6.5 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent A and 6.25 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent B; (d) PSP toxins standards in oyster tissue with 6.5 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent A and 6.25 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent B.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4417969&req=5

toxins-07-01324-f003: (a) Scallop PSP toxin-free with 11 mM heptane sulfonate in mobile phase; (b) GTX4 and GTX1 in scallop tissue with 11 mM heptane sulfonate in mobile phase; (c) PSP toxins standards in scallop tissue with 6.5 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent A and 6.25 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent B; (d) PSP toxins standards in oyster tissue with 6.5 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent A and 6.25 mM heptane sulfonate in solvent B.
Mentions: It was found that the behavior of PSP toxins in mussels and clams is similar. The same conditions were used for these two shellfish. As mentioned, the concentration of heptane sulfonate for both solvents in order to get a good resolution was 8.25 mM in all cases. However, one scallop matrix peak coeluted with GTX4; to separate them heptane sulfonate concentration was changed in solvent A, with 6.5 mM being the appropriate concentration. When oyster was studied the same problem was found as in the case of the scallop, namely that GTX4 coeluted with a matrix peak and also another peak coeluted with dcGTX3. Therefore, the heptane sulfonate concentration was modified to 6.5 mM in solvent A and to 6.25 mM in solvent B, although the separation between dcGTX3 and the matrix peak was not optimal. Figure 3 shows the chromatograms of (a) a toxin-free scallop tissue, where it is possible to see the matrix peak for a 11 mM heptane sulfonate concentration; (b) the overlapping of GTX4 and that peak at that concentration; and finally, (c) the separation of both peaks, when the concentration of heptane sulfonate was changed. The chromatogram in (d) shows the separation obtained for oyster.

Bottom Line: The matrix peaks are not always the same, which is a significant issue when it comes to producing good, reliable results regarding resolution and toxicity information.Scallop and oyster matrices needed a decrease in the concentration of heptane sulfonate to separate GTX4 from matrix peaks, as well as dcGTX3 for oysters, with a concentration of 6.5 mM for solvent A and 6.25 mM for solvent B.Also, for scallops and oysters, matrix interferences depend not only on the sampling site but also on the date of collection as well as the species; for mussels and clams, differences are noted only when the sampling site varies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Analytical Chemistry, Science Faculty, University of Santiago de Compostela, Lugo 27002, Spain. veronica.rey@rai.usc.es.

ABSTRACT
The separation of PSP toxins using liquid chromatography with a post-column oxidation fluorescence detection method was performed with different matrices. The separation of PSP toxins depends on several factors, and it is crucial to take into account the presence of interfering matrix peaks to produce a good separation. The matrix peaks are not always the same, which is a significant issue when it comes to producing good, reliable results regarding resolution and toxicity information. Different real shellfish matrices (mussel, scallop, clam and oyster) were studied, and it was seen that the interference is not the same for each individual matrix. It also depends on the species, sampling location and the date of collection. It was proposed that separation should be accomplished taking into account the type of matrix, as well as the concentration of heptane sulfonate in both solvents, since the mobile phase varies regarding the matrix. Scallop and oyster matrices needed a decrease in the concentration of heptane sulfonate to separate GTX4 from matrix peaks, as well as dcGTX3 for oysters, with a concentration of 6.5 mM for solvent A and 6.25 mM for solvent B. For mussel and clam matrices, interfering peaks are not as large as they are in the other group, and the heptane sulfonate concentration was 8.25 mM for both solvents. Also, for scallops and oysters, matrix interferences depend not only on the sampling site but also on the date of collection as well as the species; for mussels and clams, differences are noted only when the sampling site varies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus