Limits...
Investigation of Collimator Influential Parameter on SPECT Image Quality: a Monte Carlo Study.

Banari Bahnamiri Sh - J Biomed Phys Eng (2015)

Bottom Line: Because if image quality is low, the possibility of making a mistake in diagnosing and treating the patient will rise.The results of the experimental measurments and simulation calculations revealed a relative difference of less than 5% leading to the confirmation of the accuracy of conducted simulation MCNP code calculation.This is the first essential step in the design and modelling of new collimators used for creating high quality images in nuclear medicine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Assistant Professor of Nuclear Physics, Tabari University of Babol, Iran;

ABSTRACT

Background: Obtaining high quality images in Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) device  is the most important goal in nuclear medicine. Because if image quality is low, the possibility of making a mistake in diagnosing and treating the patient will rise. Studying effective factors in spatial resolution of imaging systems is thus deemed to be vital. One of the most important factors in SPECT imaging in nuclear medicine is the use of an appropriate collimator for a certain radiopharmaceutical feature in order to create the best image as it can be effective in the quantity of Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) which is the main parameter  in spatial resolution.

Method: In this research, the simulation of the detector and collimator of SPECT imaging device, Model HD3 made by Philips Co. and the investigation of important factors on the collimator were carried out using MCNP-4c code.

Results: The results of the experimental measurments and simulation calculations revealed a relative difference of less than 5% leading to the confirmation of the accuracy of conducted simulation MCNP code calculation.

Conclusion: This is the first essential step in the design and modelling of new collimators used for creating high quality images in nuclear medicine.

No MeSH data available.


Cross-Sectional View of a SPECT System
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4417619&req=5

Figure 1: Cross-Sectional View of a SPECT System

Mentions: The study of the inside of the body to diagnose a disease without surgical methods is done through imaging in nuclear medicine. Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), a type in which gamma photon–emitting radionuclides are administered and then detected by one or more gamma cameras rotated around the patient, using series of two-dimensional images to recreate a three-dimensional view. A lot of studies are focused on obtaining high-resolution images[1-8]. Also, Several studies on the spatial resolution of SPECT have shown that resolution varies with source–detector distance and the collimator[13-22] because a correct diagnosis using a high quality image can help physicians to provide effective treatment. Hence, it is necessary to examine factors affecting the quality of the images created by imaging devices. One of the most important factors in imaging in nuclear medicine is the use of an appropriate collimator for a certain radiopharmaceutical in order to create the best image because it can be effective on the quantity of Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) which is the main parameter in measuring image clarity[9]. Indeed, Spatial resolution quantifies the size of the smallest object that can be resolved reliably, and is often expressed as the FWHM of a point spread function. For projection data acquired with an gamma camera, the total resolution depends on the intrinsic resolution and the collimator resolution[10] as in figure 1.


Investigation of Collimator Influential Parameter on SPECT Image Quality: a Monte Carlo Study.

Banari Bahnamiri Sh - J Biomed Phys Eng (2015)

Cross-Sectional View of a SPECT System
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4417619&req=5

Figure 1: Cross-Sectional View of a SPECT System
Mentions: The study of the inside of the body to diagnose a disease without surgical methods is done through imaging in nuclear medicine. Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), a type in which gamma photon–emitting radionuclides are administered and then detected by one or more gamma cameras rotated around the patient, using series of two-dimensional images to recreate a three-dimensional view. A lot of studies are focused on obtaining high-resolution images[1-8]. Also, Several studies on the spatial resolution of SPECT have shown that resolution varies with source–detector distance and the collimator[13-22] because a correct diagnosis using a high quality image can help physicians to provide effective treatment. Hence, it is necessary to examine factors affecting the quality of the images created by imaging devices. One of the most important factors in imaging in nuclear medicine is the use of an appropriate collimator for a certain radiopharmaceutical in order to create the best image because it can be effective on the quantity of Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) which is the main parameter in measuring image clarity[9]. Indeed, Spatial resolution quantifies the size of the smallest object that can be resolved reliably, and is often expressed as the FWHM of a point spread function. For projection data acquired with an gamma camera, the total resolution depends on the intrinsic resolution and the collimator resolution[10] as in figure 1.

Bottom Line: Because if image quality is low, the possibility of making a mistake in diagnosing and treating the patient will rise.The results of the experimental measurments and simulation calculations revealed a relative difference of less than 5% leading to the confirmation of the accuracy of conducted simulation MCNP code calculation.This is the first essential step in the design and modelling of new collimators used for creating high quality images in nuclear medicine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Assistant Professor of Nuclear Physics, Tabari University of Babol, Iran;

ABSTRACT

Background: Obtaining high quality images in Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) device  is the most important goal in nuclear medicine. Because if image quality is low, the possibility of making a mistake in diagnosing and treating the patient will rise. Studying effective factors in spatial resolution of imaging systems is thus deemed to be vital. One of the most important factors in SPECT imaging in nuclear medicine is the use of an appropriate collimator for a certain radiopharmaceutical feature in order to create the best image as it can be effective in the quantity of Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) which is the main parameter  in spatial resolution.

Method: In this research, the simulation of the detector and collimator of SPECT imaging device, Model HD3 made by Philips Co. and the investigation of important factors on the collimator were carried out using MCNP-4c code.

Results: The results of the experimental measurments and simulation calculations revealed a relative difference of less than 5% leading to the confirmation of the accuracy of conducted simulation MCNP code calculation.

Conclusion: This is the first essential step in the design and modelling of new collimators used for creating high quality images in nuclear medicine.

No MeSH data available.