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A review of on-site wastewater treatment systems in Western Australia from 1997 to 2011.

Gunady M, Shishkina N, Tan H, Rodriguez C - J Environ Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: However, there are concerns that some OWTS installed in WA are either performing below expected standards or failing.Poorly performing OWTS are often attributed to inadequate installation, inadequate maintenance, poor public awareness, insufficient local authority resources, ongoing wastewater management issues, or inadequate adoption of standards, procedures, and guidelines.Recommendations to the Department of Health Western Australia (DOHWA) and Local Government (LG) in regard to management strategies and institutional arrangements of OWTS are also highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health, Government of Western Australia, Grace Vaughan House, 227 Stubbs Terrace, Shenton Park, WA 6008, Australia.

ABSTRACT
On-site wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) are widely used in Western Australia (WA) to treat and dispose of household wastewater in areas where centralized sewerage systems are unavailable. Septic tanks, aerobic treatment units (ATUs), and composting toilets with greywater systems are among the most well established and commonly used OWTS. However, there are concerns that some OWTS installed in WA are either performing below expected standards or failing. Poorly performing OWTS are often attributed to inadequate installation, inadequate maintenance, poor public awareness, insufficient local authority resources, ongoing wastewater management issues, or inadequate adoption of standards, procedures, and guidelines. This paper is to review the installations and failures of OWTS in WA. Recommendations to the Department of Health Western Australia (DOHWA) and Local Government (LG) in regard to management strategies and institutional arrangements of OWTS are also highlighted.

No MeSH data available.


Classification of major OWTS failures in WA (N = 53).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4417582&req=5

fig6: Classification of major OWTS failures in WA (N = 53).

Mentions: The most common reasons for OWTS failures in the survey include groundwater and surface water ingress, systems not installed properly, unsuitable soil type, and undersized systems. Several LGs also mentioned other factors that contributed to OWTS failures, including increase in wastewater volume, root invasion, illegal installation, unauthorised tampering, cross connection to stormwater disposal, undersized systems, and unauthorised materials (such as fats, oils, and yeasts). Figure 6 presents the classification of major OWTS failures identified by LGs in WA.


A review of on-site wastewater treatment systems in Western Australia from 1997 to 2011.

Gunady M, Shishkina N, Tan H, Rodriguez C - J Environ Public Health (2015)

Classification of major OWTS failures in WA (N = 53).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4417582&req=5

fig6: Classification of major OWTS failures in WA (N = 53).
Mentions: The most common reasons for OWTS failures in the survey include groundwater and surface water ingress, systems not installed properly, unsuitable soil type, and undersized systems. Several LGs also mentioned other factors that contributed to OWTS failures, including increase in wastewater volume, root invasion, illegal installation, unauthorised tampering, cross connection to stormwater disposal, undersized systems, and unauthorised materials (such as fats, oils, and yeasts). Figure 6 presents the classification of major OWTS failures identified by LGs in WA.

Bottom Line: However, there are concerns that some OWTS installed in WA are either performing below expected standards or failing.Poorly performing OWTS are often attributed to inadequate installation, inadequate maintenance, poor public awareness, insufficient local authority resources, ongoing wastewater management issues, or inadequate adoption of standards, procedures, and guidelines.Recommendations to the Department of Health Western Australia (DOHWA) and Local Government (LG) in regard to management strategies and institutional arrangements of OWTS are also highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health, Government of Western Australia, Grace Vaughan House, 227 Stubbs Terrace, Shenton Park, WA 6008, Australia.

ABSTRACT
On-site wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) are widely used in Western Australia (WA) to treat and dispose of household wastewater in areas where centralized sewerage systems are unavailable. Septic tanks, aerobic treatment units (ATUs), and composting toilets with greywater systems are among the most well established and commonly used OWTS. However, there are concerns that some OWTS installed in WA are either performing below expected standards or failing. Poorly performing OWTS are often attributed to inadequate installation, inadequate maintenance, poor public awareness, insufficient local authority resources, ongoing wastewater management issues, or inadequate adoption of standards, procedures, and guidelines. This paper is to review the installations and failures of OWTS in WA. Recommendations to the Department of Health Western Australia (DOHWA) and Local Government (LG) in regard to management strategies and institutional arrangements of OWTS are also highlighted.

No MeSH data available.