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Plasma Lactate Levels Increase during Hyperinsulinemic Euglycemic Clamp and Oral Glucose Tolerance Test.

Berhane F, Fite A, Daboul N, Al-Janabi W, Msallaty Z, Caruso M, Lewis MK, Yi Z, Diamond MP, Abou-Samra AB, Seyoum B - J Diabetes Res (2015)

Bottom Line: Participants with BMI < 30 had significantly higher mean M-values compared to those with BMI ≥ 30 at baseline (P < 0.05).In addition, those with impaired glucose tolerance test (IGT) had significantly higher mean lactate levels compared to those with normal glucose tolerance (P < 0.001).In conclusion, we found that lactate increased during HIEC study, which is a state of hyperinsulinemia similar to the metabolic milieu seen during the early stages in the development of T2D.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.

ABSTRACT
Insulin resistance, which plays a central role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D), is an early indicator that heralds the occurrence of T2D. It is imperative to understand the metabolic changes that occur at the cellular level in the early stages of insulin resistance. The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of circulating lactate levels during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (HIEC) study in normal nondiabetic subjects. Lactate and glycerol were determined every 30 minutes during OGTT and HIEC on 22 participants. Lactate progressively increased throughout the HIEC study period (P < 0.001). Participants with BMI < 30 had significantly higher mean M-values compared to those with BMI ≥ 30 at baseline (P < 0.05). This trend also continued throughout the OGTT. In addition, those with impaired glucose tolerance test (IGT) had significantly higher mean lactate levels compared to those with normal glucose tolerance (P < 0.001). In conclusion, we found that lactate increased during HIEC study, which is a state of hyperinsulinemia similar to the metabolic milieu seen during the early stages in the development of T2D.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Lactate levels during OGTT according to glucose tolerance. OGTT was based on 75 g oral glucose tolerance tested over 120 min. Normal glucose tolerance (NGT) is based on glucose levels less than or equal to 140 mg/dL at time 120 min, and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is based on glucose levels 140–200 mg/dL at time 120 min. Plasma lactate was measured as shown in Study Subjects. (a) showed significantly higher levels of lactate among participants with IGT. The difference continued throughout the period of OGTT. (b) showed mean total lactate levels during OGTT. The cumulative lactate level among participants with IGT was significantly higher than those participants with NGT (P < 0.001).
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fig5: Lactate levels during OGTT according to glucose tolerance. OGTT was based on 75 g oral glucose tolerance tested over 120 min. Normal glucose tolerance (NGT) is based on glucose levels less than or equal to 140 mg/dL at time 120 min, and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is based on glucose levels 140–200 mg/dL at time 120 min. Plasma lactate was measured as shown in Study Subjects. (a) showed significantly higher levels of lactate among participants with IGT. The difference continued throughout the period of OGTT. (b) showed mean total lactate levels during OGTT. The cumulative lactate level among participants with IGT was significantly higher than those participants with NGT (P < 0.001).

Mentions: Additionally, the fasting lactate level was significantly higher among patients with IGTT than NGTT. The difference continued during the entire period of OGTT. For those with IGTT the lactate level increased progressively whereas for those with NGTT the lactate level was stable throughout the test (Figure 5(a)). Likewise lactate was significantly higher among those with IGTT than those with NGTT (5.7 ± 2.0 mM versus 3.7 ± 1.7 mM, P < 0.001) (Figure 5(b)).


Plasma Lactate Levels Increase during Hyperinsulinemic Euglycemic Clamp and Oral Glucose Tolerance Test.

Berhane F, Fite A, Daboul N, Al-Janabi W, Msallaty Z, Caruso M, Lewis MK, Yi Z, Diamond MP, Abou-Samra AB, Seyoum B - J Diabetes Res (2015)

Lactate levels during OGTT according to glucose tolerance. OGTT was based on 75 g oral glucose tolerance tested over 120 min. Normal glucose tolerance (NGT) is based on glucose levels less than or equal to 140 mg/dL at time 120 min, and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is based on glucose levels 140–200 mg/dL at time 120 min. Plasma lactate was measured as shown in Study Subjects. (a) showed significantly higher levels of lactate among participants with IGT. The difference continued throughout the period of OGTT. (b) showed mean total lactate levels during OGTT. The cumulative lactate level among participants with IGT was significantly higher than those participants with NGT (P < 0.001).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4417566&req=5

fig5: Lactate levels during OGTT according to glucose tolerance. OGTT was based on 75 g oral glucose tolerance tested over 120 min. Normal glucose tolerance (NGT) is based on glucose levels less than or equal to 140 mg/dL at time 120 min, and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is based on glucose levels 140–200 mg/dL at time 120 min. Plasma lactate was measured as shown in Study Subjects. (a) showed significantly higher levels of lactate among participants with IGT. The difference continued throughout the period of OGTT. (b) showed mean total lactate levels during OGTT. The cumulative lactate level among participants with IGT was significantly higher than those participants with NGT (P < 0.001).
Mentions: Additionally, the fasting lactate level was significantly higher among patients with IGTT than NGTT. The difference continued during the entire period of OGTT. For those with IGTT the lactate level increased progressively whereas for those with NGTT the lactate level was stable throughout the test (Figure 5(a)). Likewise lactate was significantly higher among those with IGTT than those with NGTT (5.7 ± 2.0 mM versus 3.7 ± 1.7 mM, P < 0.001) (Figure 5(b)).

Bottom Line: Participants with BMI < 30 had significantly higher mean M-values compared to those with BMI ≥ 30 at baseline (P < 0.05).In addition, those with impaired glucose tolerance test (IGT) had significantly higher mean lactate levels compared to those with normal glucose tolerance (P < 0.001).In conclusion, we found that lactate increased during HIEC study, which is a state of hyperinsulinemia similar to the metabolic milieu seen during the early stages in the development of T2D.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.

ABSTRACT
Insulin resistance, which plays a central role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D), is an early indicator that heralds the occurrence of T2D. It is imperative to understand the metabolic changes that occur at the cellular level in the early stages of insulin resistance. The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of circulating lactate levels during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (HIEC) study in normal nondiabetic subjects. Lactate and glycerol were determined every 30 minutes during OGTT and HIEC on 22 participants. Lactate progressively increased throughout the HIEC study period (P < 0.001). Participants with BMI < 30 had significantly higher mean M-values compared to those with BMI ≥ 30 at baseline (P < 0.05). This trend also continued throughout the OGTT. In addition, those with impaired glucose tolerance test (IGT) had significantly higher mean lactate levels compared to those with normal glucose tolerance (P < 0.001). In conclusion, we found that lactate increased during HIEC study, which is a state of hyperinsulinemia similar to the metabolic milieu seen during the early stages in the development of T2D.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus