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Diagnosis of spasmodic dysphonia manifested by swallowing difficulty in videofluoroscopic swallowing study.

Yeo HG, Lee SJ, Hyun JK, Kim TU - Ann Rehabil Med (2015)

Bottom Line: The patient also reported pharyngolaryngeal pain, throat discomfort, dyspnea, and voice change.The VFSS revealed continuous twitch-like involuntary movement of the laryngeal muscle around the vocal folds.Then, he was diagnosed with spasmodic dysphonia by VFSS, auditory-perceptual voice analysis, and physical examination.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Spasmodic dysphonia is defined as a focal laryngeal disorder characterized by dystonic spasms of the vocal cord during speech. We described a case of a 22-year-old male patient who presented complaining of idiopathic difficulty swallowing that suddenly developed 6 months ago. The patient also reported pharyngolaryngeal pain, throat discomfort, dyspnea, and voice change. Because laryngoscopy found no specific problems, an electrodiagnostic study and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) were performed to find the cause of dysphagia. The VFSS revealed continuous twitch-like involuntary movement of the laryngeal muscle around the vocal folds. Then, he was diagnosed with spasmodic dysphonia by VFSS, auditory-perceptual voice analysis, and physical examination. So, we report the first case of spasmodic dysphonia accompanied with difficulty swallowing that was confirmed by VFSS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) lateral view. Twitch-like involuntary movement (black arrow) in laryngeal muscles around vocal fold. (B) VFSS anterior-posterior view. Involuntary movement was also observed (anterior-posterior view, white arrow). This movement occurred before or after swallowing.
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Figure 2: (A) Videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) lateral view. Twitch-like involuntary movement (black arrow) in laryngeal muscles around vocal fold. (B) VFSS anterior-posterior view. Involuntary movement was also observed (anterior-posterior view, white arrow). This movement occurred before or after swallowing.

Mentions: The next day, a videofluoroscopic swallowing study was carried out according to the modified Logemann method [6]. Parameters representing oropharyngeal swallowing function were analyzed while swallowing thin and thick barium liquid (Table 1). There was no penetration or aspiration on thick (200%, BaSO4) and thin (70% BaSO4) liquid swallowing. Oral transit time, pharyngeal delay time, and pharyngeal transit time were all within the normal range, but there was minimal pharyngeal residue on the vallecula area, and twitch-like involuntary movement on the laryngeal muscle around the vocal folds (Fig. 2). He did not feel this involuntary movement, which occurred before and after swallowing.


Diagnosis of spasmodic dysphonia manifested by swallowing difficulty in videofluoroscopic swallowing study.

Yeo HG, Lee SJ, Hyun JK, Kim TU - Ann Rehabil Med (2015)

(A) Videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) lateral view. Twitch-like involuntary movement (black arrow) in laryngeal muscles around vocal fold. (B) VFSS anterior-posterior view. Involuntary movement was also observed (anterior-posterior view, white arrow). This movement occurred before or after swallowing.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414980&req=5

Figure 2: (A) Videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) lateral view. Twitch-like involuntary movement (black arrow) in laryngeal muscles around vocal fold. (B) VFSS anterior-posterior view. Involuntary movement was also observed (anterior-posterior view, white arrow). This movement occurred before or after swallowing.
Mentions: The next day, a videofluoroscopic swallowing study was carried out according to the modified Logemann method [6]. Parameters representing oropharyngeal swallowing function were analyzed while swallowing thin and thick barium liquid (Table 1). There was no penetration or aspiration on thick (200%, BaSO4) and thin (70% BaSO4) liquid swallowing. Oral transit time, pharyngeal delay time, and pharyngeal transit time were all within the normal range, but there was minimal pharyngeal residue on the vallecula area, and twitch-like involuntary movement on the laryngeal muscle around the vocal folds (Fig. 2). He did not feel this involuntary movement, which occurred before and after swallowing.

Bottom Line: The patient also reported pharyngolaryngeal pain, throat discomfort, dyspnea, and voice change.The VFSS revealed continuous twitch-like involuntary movement of the laryngeal muscle around the vocal folds.Then, he was diagnosed with spasmodic dysphonia by VFSS, auditory-perceptual voice analysis, and physical examination.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Spasmodic dysphonia is defined as a focal laryngeal disorder characterized by dystonic spasms of the vocal cord during speech. We described a case of a 22-year-old male patient who presented complaining of idiopathic difficulty swallowing that suddenly developed 6 months ago. The patient also reported pharyngolaryngeal pain, throat discomfort, dyspnea, and voice change. Because laryngoscopy found no specific problems, an electrodiagnostic study and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) were performed to find the cause of dysphagia. The VFSS revealed continuous twitch-like involuntary movement of the laryngeal muscle around the vocal folds. Then, he was diagnosed with spasmodic dysphonia by VFSS, auditory-perceptual voice analysis, and physical examination. So, we report the first case of spasmodic dysphonia accompanied with difficulty swallowing that was confirmed by VFSS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus