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The effect of glenohumeral internal rotation deficit on the isokinetic strength, pain, and quality of life in male high school baseball players.

Lee J, Kim LN, Song H, Kim S, Woo S - Ann Rehabil Med (2015)

Bottom Line: All subjects had increased external rotation range of motion and decreased internal rotation in the throwing shoulder.In the isokinetic strength test, a significantly weaker muscular state at an angular velocity of 180°/s was observed in group A, compared to group B.GIRD is one of the main risk factors of glenohumeral joint damage, and it is correlated with reduced isokinetic strength and quality of life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sahmyook Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the effects of glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD) on the isokinetic strength, body pain, and the quality of life in male high school baseball players of Korea.

Methods: Fifty-six male high school baseball players were divided into either group A (GIRD≥20°, n=12) or group B (GIRD<20°, n=44). The range of motion in the shoulder and the isokinetic strength were measured. Questionnaires were administered regarding the body pain location by using the visual analogue scale, and the quality of life was measured by using the SF-36 Form.

Results: All subjects had increased external rotation range of motion and decreased internal rotation in the throwing shoulder. The incidence of GIRD (≥20°) was 21.43% in the present study. In the isokinetic strength test, a significantly weaker muscular state at an angular velocity of 180°/s was observed in group A, compared to group B. For the comparison of the pain, the frequency of shoulder pain was higher (33.93%) than other body pain, among the study subjects.

Conclusion: GIRD is one of the main risk factors of glenohumeral joint damage, and it is correlated with reduced isokinetic strength and quality of life. High school baseball players will need appropriate shoulder rehabilitation programs for the improvement in their quality of life and performance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Shoulder isokinetic strength measurement using the HUMAC/NORM Testing & Rehabilitation System. This system was used to assess the isokinetic strength of the shoulder flexion and extension, with participants in the supine position and the hip and trunk stabilized by a seatbelt and a shoulder stabilizer belt. The exercise included the measurement of the shoulder range of motion from the maximum position of flexion to the maximum position of extension. This test was repeated 3 times, and the mean of the 3 measurements was calculated at angular velocities of 60°/s and 180°/s.
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Figure 1: Shoulder isokinetic strength measurement using the HUMAC/NORM Testing & Rehabilitation System. This system was used to assess the isokinetic strength of the shoulder flexion and extension, with participants in the supine position and the hip and trunk stabilized by a seatbelt and a shoulder stabilizer belt. The exercise included the measurement of the shoulder range of motion from the maximum position of flexion to the maximum position of extension. This test was repeated 3 times, and the mean of the 3 measurements was calculated at angular velocities of 60°/s and 180°/s.

Mentions: An examiner who was trained at the Korea Institute of Sports Science conducted the shoulder isokinetic strength measurement using the HUMAC/NORM Testing & Rehabilitation System (Computer Sports Medicine Inc., Stoughton, MA, USA). With the participants in the supine position on the measurement table, a seatbelt and a shoulder stabilizer belt were used to minimize any body movement other than that of the glenohumeral joint. The test tables were aligned, and the lengths of the tables were adjusted to prevent the subject from performing a handgrip action during elbow flexion. The glenohumeral joint shaft of the subjects and the dynamometer shaft were matched, by using the shoulder ROM of the subjects as the reference range. The exercise included measuring the shoulder ROM from the maximum position of flexion to the maximum position of extension. To obtain the flexion and extension isokinetic strengths in the T-shoulder and NT shoulder, the participants were trained through 3 repetitions of the full active ROM at angular velocities of 60°/s and 180°/s, respectively. After adequate rest, the exercise was repeated 3 times, and the mean of the 3 measurements was calculated. The measured values were recorded in the built-in software application Patient Setup Window [16] (Fig. 1).


The effect of glenohumeral internal rotation deficit on the isokinetic strength, pain, and quality of life in male high school baseball players.

Lee J, Kim LN, Song H, Kim S, Woo S - Ann Rehabil Med (2015)

Shoulder isokinetic strength measurement using the HUMAC/NORM Testing & Rehabilitation System. This system was used to assess the isokinetic strength of the shoulder flexion and extension, with participants in the supine position and the hip and trunk stabilized by a seatbelt and a shoulder stabilizer belt. The exercise included the measurement of the shoulder range of motion from the maximum position of flexion to the maximum position of extension. This test was repeated 3 times, and the mean of the 3 measurements was calculated at angular velocities of 60°/s and 180°/s.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414964&req=5

Figure 1: Shoulder isokinetic strength measurement using the HUMAC/NORM Testing & Rehabilitation System. This system was used to assess the isokinetic strength of the shoulder flexion and extension, with participants in the supine position and the hip and trunk stabilized by a seatbelt and a shoulder stabilizer belt. The exercise included the measurement of the shoulder range of motion from the maximum position of flexion to the maximum position of extension. This test was repeated 3 times, and the mean of the 3 measurements was calculated at angular velocities of 60°/s and 180°/s.
Mentions: An examiner who was trained at the Korea Institute of Sports Science conducted the shoulder isokinetic strength measurement using the HUMAC/NORM Testing & Rehabilitation System (Computer Sports Medicine Inc., Stoughton, MA, USA). With the participants in the supine position on the measurement table, a seatbelt and a shoulder stabilizer belt were used to minimize any body movement other than that of the glenohumeral joint. The test tables were aligned, and the lengths of the tables were adjusted to prevent the subject from performing a handgrip action during elbow flexion. The glenohumeral joint shaft of the subjects and the dynamometer shaft were matched, by using the shoulder ROM of the subjects as the reference range. The exercise included measuring the shoulder ROM from the maximum position of flexion to the maximum position of extension. To obtain the flexion and extension isokinetic strengths in the T-shoulder and NT shoulder, the participants were trained through 3 repetitions of the full active ROM at angular velocities of 60°/s and 180°/s, respectively. After adequate rest, the exercise was repeated 3 times, and the mean of the 3 measurements was calculated. The measured values were recorded in the built-in software application Patient Setup Window [16] (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: All subjects had increased external rotation range of motion and decreased internal rotation in the throwing shoulder.In the isokinetic strength test, a significantly weaker muscular state at an angular velocity of 180°/s was observed in group A, compared to group B.GIRD is one of the main risk factors of glenohumeral joint damage, and it is correlated with reduced isokinetic strength and quality of life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sahmyook Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the effects of glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD) on the isokinetic strength, body pain, and the quality of life in male high school baseball players of Korea.

Methods: Fifty-six male high school baseball players were divided into either group A (GIRD≥20°, n=12) or group B (GIRD<20°, n=44). The range of motion in the shoulder and the isokinetic strength were measured. Questionnaires were administered regarding the body pain location by using the visual analogue scale, and the quality of life was measured by using the SF-36 Form.

Results: All subjects had increased external rotation range of motion and decreased internal rotation in the throwing shoulder. The incidence of GIRD (≥20°) was 21.43% in the present study. In the isokinetic strength test, a significantly weaker muscular state at an angular velocity of 180°/s was observed in group A, compared to group B. For the comparison of the pain, the frequency of shoulder pain was higher (33.93%) than other body pain, among the study subjects.

Conclusion: GIRD is one of the main risk factors of glenohumeral joint damage, and it is correlated with reduced isokinetic strength and quality of life. High school baseball players will need appropriate shoulder rehabilitation programs for the improvement in their quality of life and performance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus