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Microscopical and chemical surface characterization of CAD/CAM zircona abutments after different cleaning procedures. A qualitative analysis.

Gehrke P, Tabellion A, Fischer C - J Adv Prosthodont (2015)

Bottom Line: The abutments of the test group showed reduction of surface contamination after undergoing an ultrasonic cleaning procedure.Within the limits of the study design, the results suggest that a defined ultrasonic cleaning process can be advantageously employed to reduce such debris, thus, supposedly enhancing soft tissue healing.Although the adverse long-term influence of abutment contamination on the biological stability of peri-implant tissues has been evidenced, a standardized and validated polishing and cleaning protocol still has to be implemented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Private Practice, Ludwigshafen, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To describe and characterize the surface topography and cleanliness of CAD/CAM manufactured zirconia abutments after steaming and ultrasonic cleaning.

Materials and methods: A total of 12 ceramic CAD/CAM implant abutments of various manufacturers were produced and randomly divided into two groups of six samples each (control and test group). Four two-piece hybrid abutments and two one-piece abutments made of zirconium-dioxide were assessed per each group. In the control group, cleaning by steam was performed. The test group underwent an ultrasonic cleaning procedure with acetone, ethyl alcohol and antibacterial solution. Groups were subjected to scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to verify and characterize contaminant chemical characterization non-quantitatively.

Results: All zirconia CAD/CAM abutments in the present study displayed production-induced wear particles, debris as well as organic and inorganic contaminants. The abutments of the test group showed reduction of surface contamination after undergoing an ultrasonic cleaning procedure. However, an absolute removal of pollutants could not be achieved.

Conclusion: The presence of debris on the transmucosal surface of CAD/CAM zirconia abutments of various manufacturers was confirmed. Within the limits of the study design, the results suggest that a defined ultrasonic cleaning process can be advantageously employed to reduce such debris, thus, supposedly enhancing soft tissue healing. Although the adverse long-term influence of abutment contamination on the biological stability of peri-implant tissues has been evidenced, a standardized and validated polishing and cleaning protocol still has to be implemented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pictures A-D show steam-cleaned surface status with clearly visible debris and milling grooves. Pictures E-H reveal the reduction of surface contamination after ultrasonic cleaning procedure, with remaining pollutants (Sample 5).
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Figure 8: Pictures A-D show steam-cleaned surface status with clearly visible debris and milling grooves. Pictures E-H reveal the reduction of surface contamination after ultrasonic cleaning procedure, with remaining pollutants (Sample 5).

Mentions: After steam-cleaning, the various implant abutments presented differences with regard to their surface quality and cleanliness. Each of the CAD/CAM abutments were examined and displayed surface contamination of various degrees. On- and/or intra-layered particles or roughness resulting from the mechanical milling during the CAM process (Fig. 4, Fig. 5, Fig. 6, Fig. 7, Fig. 8, Fig. 9, A-D) were detected; (References to the tables in the captions to the figures: 0-values mean that the element was detected; blank spaces indicate that the element was not found. All values in atom %).


Microscopical and chemical surface characterization of CAD/CAM zircona abutments after different cleaning procedures. A qualitative analysis.

Gehrke P, Tabellion A, Fischer C - J Adv Prosthodont (2015)

Pictures A-D show steam-cleaned surface status with clearly visible debris and milling grooves. Pictures E-H reveal the reduction of surface contamination after ultrasonic cleaning procedure, with remaining pollutants (Sample 5).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414946&req=5

Figure 8: Pictures A-D show steam-cleaned surface status with clearly visible debris and milling grooves. Pictures E-H reveal the reduction of surface contamination after ultrasonic cleaning procedure, with remaining pollutants (Sample 5).
Mentions: After steam-cleaning, the various implant abutments presented differences with regard to their surface quality and cleanliness. Each of the CAD/CAM abutments were examined and displayed surface contamination of various degrees. On- and/or intra-layered particles or roughness resulting from the mechanical milling during the CAM process (Fig. 4, Fig. 5, Fig. 6, Fig. 7, Fig. 8, Fig. 9, A-D) were detected; (References to the tables in the captions to the figures: 0-values mean that the element was detected; blank spaces indicate that the element was not found. All values in atom %).

Bottom Line: The abutments of the test group showed reduction of surface contamination after undergoing an ultrasonic cleaning procedure.Within the limits of the study design, the results suggest that a defined ultrasonic cleaning process can be advantageously employed to reduce such debris, thus, supposedly enhancing soft tissue healing.Although the adverse long-term influence of abutment contamination on the biological stability of peri-implant tissues has been evidenced, a standardized and validated polishing and cleaning protocol still has to be implemented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Private Practice, Ludwigshafen, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To describe and characterize the surface topography and cleanliness of CAD/CAM manufactured zirconia abutments after steaming and ultrasonic cleaning.

Materials and methods: A total of 12 ceramic CAD/CAM implant abutments of various manufacturers were produced and randomly divided into two groups of six samples each (control and test group). Four two-piece hybrid abutments and two one-piece abutments made of zirconium-dioxide were assessed per each group. In the control group, cleaning by steam was performed. The test group underwent an ultrasonic cleaning procedure with acetone, ethyl alcohol and antibacterial solution. Groups were subjected to scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to verify and characterize contaminant chemical characterization non-quantitatively.

Results: All zirconia CAD/CAM abutments in the present study displayed production-induced wear particles, debris as well as organic and inorganic contaminants. The abutments of the test group showed reduction of surface contamination after undergoing an ultrasonic cleaning procedure. However, an absolute removal of pollutants could not be achieved.

Conclusion: The presence of debris on the transmucosal surface of CAD/CAM zirconia abutments of various manufacturers was confirmed. Within the limits of the study design, the results suggest that a defined ultrasonic cleaning process can be advantageously employed to reduce such debris, thus, supposedly enhancing soft tissue healing. Although the adverse long-term influence of abutment contamination on the biological stability of peri-implant tissues has been evidenced, a standardized and validated polishing and cleaning protocol still has to be implemented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus