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Effect of laser-dimpled titanium surfaces on attachment of epithelial-like cells and fibroblasts.

Lee DW, Kim JG, Kim MK, Ansari S, Moshaverinia A, Choi SH, Ryu JJ - J Adv Prosthodont (2015)

Bottom Line: These discs were cleaned to a surface roughness (Ra: roughness centerline average) of 180 nm by polishing and were divided into three groups: SM (n=16) had no dimples and served as the control, SM15 (n=16) had 5-µm dimples at 10-µm intervals, and SM30 (n=16) had 5-µm dimples at 25-µm intervals in a 2 × 4 mm(2) area at the center of the disc.These findings demonstrate that laser dimpling may contribute to improving the periimplant soft tissue barrier.This study provided helpful information for developing the transmucosal surface of the abutment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontology, Veterans Health Service Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Dentistry, Graduate School, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The objective of this study was to conduct an in vitro comparative evaluation of polished and laserdimpled titanium (Ti) surfaces to determine whether either surface has an advantage in promoting the attachment of epithelial-like cells and fibroblast to Ti.

Materials and methods: Forty-eight coin-shaped samples of commercially pure, grade 4 Ti plates were used in this study. These discs were cleaned to a surface roughness (Ra: roughness centerline average) of 180 nm by polishing and were divided into three groups: SM (n=16) had no dimples and served as the control, SM15 (n=16) had 5-µm dimples at 10-µm intervals, and SM30 (n=16) had 5-µm dimples at 25-µm intervals in a 2 × 4 mm(2) area at the center of the disc. Human gingival squamous cell carcinoma cells (YD-38) and human lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) were cultured and used in cell proliferation assays, adhesion assays, immunofluorescent staining of adhesion proteins, and morphological analysis by SEM. The data were analyzed statistically to determine the significance of differences.

Results: The adhesion strength of epithelial cells was higher on Ti surfaces with 5-µm laser dimples than on polished Ti surfaces, while the adhesion of fibroblasts was not significantly changed by laser treatment of implant surfaces. However, epithelial cells and fibroblasts around the laser dimples appeared larger and showed increased expression of adhesion proteins.

Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that laser dimpling may contribute to improving the periimplant soft tissue barrier. This study provided helpful information for developing the transmucosal surface of the abutment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Immunofluorescence images (400× magnification) showing actin filaments and vinculin in fibroblast cells (MRC-5) cultured on SM and SM30 discs for 3 days. White circles indicate the laser dimples. SM: Smooth surface, served as a control and SM30: 5-µm dimples and 30-µm center distance.
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Figure 10: Immunofluorescence images (400× magnification) showing actin filaments and vinculin in fibroblast cells (MRC-5) cultured on SM and SM30 discs for 3 days. White circles indicate the laser dimples. SM: Smooth surface, served as a control and SM30: 5-µm dimples and 30-µm center distance.

Mentions: To determine the expression levels of adhesion proteins such as actin filaments, integrin-β4, and vinculin in cells cultured on dimpled discs, immunofluorescent staining analysis was performed. As Fig. 9 shows, expression levels of actin filaments and integrin-β4 in YD-38 cells were higher on SM30 discs than on SM discs. Particularly, morphology and cytoskeleton of YD-38 cells appeared more clearly visible on SM30 discs than on SM discs. Actin filaments on SM30 discs extended in a straight line in the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm. Similar to YD-38 cells in the dimpled areas, the expression levels of actin filaments and vinculin in MRC-5 cells were greater and spread further on SM30 discs than on SM discs (Fig. 10). The expression of vinculin on SM30 discs was clearly distinct in the cytoplasm and nucleus, while on SM discs, such a distinction was not clear.


Effect of laser-dimpled titanium surfaces on attachment of epithelial-like cells and fibroblasts.

Lee DW, Kim JG, Kim MK, Ansari S, Moshaverinia A, Choi SH, Ryu JJ - J Adv Prosthodont (2015)

Immunofluorescence images (400× magnification) showing actin filaments and vinculin in fibroblast cells (MRC-5) cultured on SM and SM30 discs for 3 days. White circles indicate the laser dimples. SM: Smooth surface, served as a control and SM30: 5-µm dimples and 30-µm center distance.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414944&req=5

Figure 10: Immunofluorescence images (400× magnification) showing actin filaments and vinculin in fibroblast cells (MRC-5) cultured on SM and SM30 discs for 3 days. White circles indicate the laser dimples. SM: Smooth surface, served as a control and SM30: 5-µm dimples and 30-µm center distance.
Mentions: To determine the expression levels of adhesion proteins such as actin filaments, integrin-β4, and vinculin in cells cultured on dimpled discs, immunofluorescent staining analysis was performed. As Fig. 9 shows, expression levels of actin filaments and integrin-β4 in YD-38 cells were higher on SM30 discs than on SM discs. Particularly, morphology and cytoskeleton of YD-38 cells appeared more clearly visible on SM30 discs than on SM discs. Actin filaments on SM30 discs extended in a straight line in the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm. Similar to YD-38 cells in the dimpled areas, the expression levels of actin filaments and vinculin in MRC-5 cells were greater and spread further on SM30 discs than on SM discs (Fig. 10). The expression of vinculin on SM30 discs was clearly distinct in the cytoplasm and nucleus, while on SM discs, such a distinction was not clear.

Bottom Line: These discs were cleaned to a surface roughness (Ra: roughness centerline average) of 180 nm by polishing and were divided into three groups: SM (n=16) had no dimples and served as the control, SM15 (n=16) had 5-µm dimples at 10-µm intervals, and SM30 (n=16) had 5-µm dimples at 25-µm intervals in a 2 × 4 mm(2) area at the center of the disc.These findings demonstrate that laser dimpling may contribute to improving the periimplant soft tissue barrier.This study provided helpful information for developing the transmucosal surface of the abutment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontology, Veterans Health Service Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Dentistry, Graduate School, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The objective of this study was to conduct an in vitro comparative evaluation of polished and laserdimpled titanium (Ti) surfaces to determine whether either surface has an advantage in promoting the attachment of epithelial-like cells and fibroblast to Ti.

Materials and methods: Forty-eight coin-shaped samples of commercially pure, grade 4 Ti plates were used in this study. These discs were cleaned to a surface roughness (Ra: roughness centerline average) of 180 nm by polishing and were divided into three groups: SM (n=16) had no dimples and served as the control, SM15 (n=16) had 5-µm dimples at 10-µm intervals, and SM30 (n=16) had 5-µm dimples at 25-µm intervals in a 2 × 4 mm(2) area at the center of the disc. Human gingival squamous cell carcinoma cells (YD-38) and human lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) were cultured and used in cell proliferation assays, adhesion assays, immunofluorescent staining of adhesion proteins, and morphological analysis by SEM. The data were analyzed statistically to determine the significance of differences.

Results: The adhesion strength of epithelial cells was higher on Ti surfaces with 5-µm laser dimples than on polished Ti surfaces, while the adhesion of fibroblasts was not significantly changed by laser treatment of implant surfaces. However, epithelial cells and fibroblasts around the laser dimples appeared larger and showed increased expression of adhesion proteins.

Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that laser dimpling may contribute to improving the periimplant soft tissue barrier. This study provided helpful information for developing the transmucosal surface of the abutment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus