Limits...
Risks of Lung Cancer due to Radon Exposure among the Regions of Korea.

Lee HA, Lee WK, Lim D, Park SH, Baik SJ, Kong KA, Jung-Choi K, Park H - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: The regional average indoor radon concentration was 37.5 95 Bq/m(3).In the Republic of Korea, the risk of radon is not widely recognized.Thus, information about radon health risks is important and efforts are needed to decrease the associated health problems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Radon is likely the second most common cause of lung cancer after smoking. We estimated the lung cancer risk due to radon using common risk models. Based on national radon survey data, we estimated the population-attributable fraction (PAF) and the number of lung cancer deaths attributable to radon. The exposure-age duration (EAD) and exposure-age concentration (EAC) models were used. The regional average indoor radon concentration was 37.5 95 Bq/m(3). The PAF for lung cancer was 8.3% (European Pooling Study model), 13.5% in males and 20.4% in females by EAD model, and 19.5% in males and 28.2% in females by EAC model. Due to differences in smoking by gender, the PAF of radon-induced lung cancer deaths was higher in females. In the Republic of Korea, the risk of radon is not widely recognized. Thus, information about radon health risks is important and efforts are needed to decrease the associated health problems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Summary results of attributable proportion (%) of radon induced lung cancer deaths by gender applying to the risk models developed by the sixth Biological Effects on lionizing Radiations Committee. EAC, exposure-age-concentration; EAD, exposure-age-duration.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414636&req=5

Figure 2: Summary results of attributable proportion (%) of radon induced lung cancer deaths by gender applying to the risk models developed by the sixth Biological Effects on lionizing Radiations Committee. EAC, exposure-age-concentration; EAD, exposure-age-duration.

Mentions: Tables 3 and 4 show the numbers of lung cancer deaths according to smoking status. In males, smoking alone produced the most attributable deaths, and radon alone, the fewest. However, in females, issues other than smoking and radon produced the most attributable deaths, and joint effects of smoking and radon, the fewest. Overall, the proportion of lung cancer deaths was higher among smokers than non-smokers in males. However, deaths attributable to lung cancer in females were higher among non-smokers than smokers; approximately twice as many deaths occurred among female non-smokers than smokers. The summary of joint effect between smoking and radon on lung cancer by gender represents in Fig. 2.


Risks of Lung Cancer due to Radon Exposure among the Regions of Korea.

Lee HA, Lee WK, Lim D, Park SH, Baik SJ, Kong KA, Jung-Choi K, Park H - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2015)

Summary results of attributable proportion (%) of radon induced lung cancer deaths by gender applying to the risk models developed by the sixth Biological Effects on lionizing Radiations Committee. EAC, exposure-age-concentration; EAD, exposure-age-duration.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414636&req=5

Figure 2: Summary results of attributable proportion (%) of radon induced lung cancer deaths by gender applying to the risk models developed by the sixth Biological Effects on lionizing Radiations Committee. EAC, exposure-age-concentration; EAD, exposure-age-duration.
Mentions: Tables 3 and 4 show the numbers of lung cancer deaths according to smoking status. In males, smoking alone produced the most attributable deaths, and radon alone, the fewest. However, in females, issues other than smoking and radon produced the most attributable deaths, and joint effects of smoking and radon, the fewest. Overall, the proportion of lung cancer deaths was higher among smokers than non-smokers in males. However, deaths attributable to lung cancer in females were higher among non-smokers than smokers; approximately twice as many deaths occurred among female non-smokers than smokers. The summary of joint effect between smoking and radon on lung cancer by gender represents in Fig. 2.

Bottom Line: The regional average indoor radon concentration was 37.5 95 Bq/m(3).In the Republic of Korea, the risk of radon is not widely recognized.Thus, information about radon health risks is important and efforts are needed to decrease the associated health problems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Radon is likely the second most common cause of lung cancer after smoking. We estimated the lung cancer risk due to radon using common risk models. Based on national radon survey data, we estimated the population-attributable fraction (PAF) and the number of lung cancer deaths attributable to radon. The exposure-age duration (EAD) and exposure-age concentration (EAC) models were used. The regional average indoor radon concentration was 37.5 95 Bq/m(3). The PAF for lung cancer was 8.3% (European Pooling Study model), 13.5% in males and 20.4% in females by EAD model, and 19.5% in males and 28.2% in females by EAC model. Due to differences in smoking by gender, the PAF of radon-induced lung cancer deaths was higher in females. In the Republic of Korea, the risk of radon is not widely recognized. Thus, information about radon health risks is important and efforts are needed to decrease the associated health problems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus