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Corn Yield and Soil Nitrous Oxide Emission under Different Fertilizer and Soil Management: A Three-Year Field Experiment in Middle Tennessee.

Deng Q, Hui D, Wang J, Iwuozo S, Yu CL, Jima T, Smart D, Reddy C, Dennis S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The management practices significantly altered soil N2O emission, with the highest in the CT-URAN (0.48 mg N2O m(-2) h(-1)) and the lowest in the NT-inhibitor (0.20 mg N2O m(-2) h(-1)) and NT-biochar (0.16 mg N2O m(-2) h(-1)) treatments.However, variations in soil N2O emission among the treatments were positively correlated with the moisture sensitivity of soil N2O emission that likely reflects an interactive effect between soil properties and WFPS.Our results indicated that improved fertilizer and soil management have the potential to maintain highly productive corn yield while reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, Tennessee State University, Nashville, Tennessee 37209, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: A three-year field experiment was conducted to examine the responses of corn yield and soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emission to various management practices in middle Tennessee.

Methodology/principal findings: The management practices include no-tillage + regular applications of urea ammonium nitrate (NT-URAN); no-tillage + regular applications of URAN + denitrification inhibitor (NT-inhibitor); no-tillage + regular applications of URAN + biochar (NT-biochar); no-tillage + 20% applications of URAN + chicken litter (NT-litter), no-tillage + split applications of URAN (NT-split); and conventional tillage + regular applications of URAN as a control (CT-URAN). Fertilizer equivalent to 217 kg N ha(-1) was applied to each of the experimental plots. Results showed that no-tillage (NT-URAN) significantly increased corn yield by 28% over the conventional tillage (CT-URAN) due to soil water conservation. The management practices significantly altered soil N2O emission, with the highest in the CT-URAN (0.48 mg N2O m(-2) h(-1)) and the lowest in the NT-inhibitor (0.20 mg N2O m(-2) h(-1)) and NT-biochar (0.16 mg N2O m(-2) h(-1)) treatments. Significant exponential relationships between soil N2O emission and water filled pore space were revealed in all treatments. However, variations in soil N2O emission among the treatments were positively correlated with the moisture sensitivity of soil N2O emission that likely reflects an interactive effect between soil properties and WFPS.

Conclusion/significance: Our results indicated that improved fertilizer and soil management have the potential to maintain highly productive corn yield while reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationships of corn yield (a, b, c) and soil N2O emission (d, e, f) with water filled pore space and soil inorganic-N (NH4+-N and NO3--N, for 2012 only), respectively across all the plots.
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pone.0125406.g002: Relationships of corn yield (a, b, c) and soil N2O emission (d, e, f) with water filled pore space and soil inorganic-N (NH4+-N and NO3--N, for 2012 only), respectively across all the plots.

Mentions: Corn yield was positively correlated with WFPS across all plots (Fig 2a). In contrast, corn yield was negatively correlated with inorganic-N (NH4+-N and NO3--N) in all treatments (Fig 2b and 2c). No significant relationship between soil N2O emission rate and WFPS or inorganic-N was detected across all plots (Fig 2d–2f). There were significant exponential relationships between soil N2O emission and WFPS in each treatment (Fig 3). The management practices significantly altered the moisture sensitivities (b values) of soil N2O emission, with the highest in the CT-URAN (b = 0.23), relatively low in the NT-inhibitor (b = 0.06), NT-biochar (b = 0.05) and NT-split (b = 0.08), and intermediate in the NT-URAN (b = 0.10) and NT-litter (b = 0.11) treatments (Table 3). Soil N2O emission was positively correlated with its moisture sensitivity (b value) among the six treatments (Fig 4).


Corn Yield and Soil Nitrous Oxide Emission under Different Fertilizer and Soil Management: A Three-Year Field Experiment in Middle Tennessee.

Deng Q, Hui D, Wang J, Iwuozo S, Yu CL, Jima T, Smart D, Reddy C, Dennis S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Relationships of corn yield (a, b, c) and soil N2O emission (d, e, f) with water filled pore space and soil inorganic-N (NH4+-N and NO3--N, for 2012 only), respectively across all the plots.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414621&req=5

pone.0125406.g002: Relationships of corn yield (a, b, c) and soil N2O emission (d, e, f) with water filled pore space and soil inorganic-N (NH4+-N and NO3--N, for 2012 only), respectively across all the plots.
Mentions: Corn yield was positively correlated with WFPS across all plots (Fig 2a). In contrast, corn yield was negatively correlated with inorganic-N (NH4+-N and NO3--N) in all treatments (Fig 2b and 2c). No significant relationship between soil N2O emission rate and WFPS or inorganic-N was detected across all plots (Fig 2d–2f). There were significant exponential relationships between soil N2O emission and WFPS in each treatment (Fig 3). The management practices significantly altered the moisture sensitivities (b values) of soil N2O emission, with the highest in the CT-URAN (b = 0.23), relatively low in the NT-inhibitor (b = 0.06), NT-biochar (b = 0.05) and NT-split (b = 0.08), and intermediate in the NT-URAN (b = 0.10) and NT-litter (b = 0.11) treatments (Table 3). Soil N2O emission was positively correlated with its moisture sensitivity (b value) among the six treatments (Fig 4).

Bottom Line: The management practices significantly altered soil N2O emission, with the highest in the CT-URAN (0.48 mg N2O m(-2) h(-1)) and the lowest in the NT-inhibitor (0.20 mg N2O m(-2) h(-1)) and NT-biochar (0.16 mg N2O m(-2) h(-1)) treatments.However, variations in soil N2O emission among the treatments were positively correlated with the moisture sensitivity of soil N2O emission that likely reflects an interactive effect between soil properties and WFPS.Our results indicated that improved fertilizer and soil management have the potential to maintain highly productive corn yield while reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, Tennessee State University, Nashville, Tennessee 37209, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: A three-year field experiment was conducted to examine the responses of corn yield and soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emission to various management practices in middle Tennessee.

Methodology/principal findings: The management practices include no-tillage + regular applications of urea ammonium nitrate (NT-URAN); no-tillage + regular applications of URAN + denitrification inhibitor (NT-inhibitor); no-tillage + regular applications of URAN + biochar (NT-biochar); no-tillage + 20% applications of URAN + chicken litter (NT-litter), no-tillage + split applications of URAN (NT-split); and conventional tillage + regular applications of URAN as a control (CT-URAN). Fertilizer equivalent to 217 kg N ha(-1) was applied to each of the experimental plots. Results showed that no-tillage (NT-URAN) significantly increased corn yield by 28% over the conventional tillage (CT-URAN) due to soil water conservation. The management practices significantly altered soil N2O emission, with the highest in the CT-URAN (0.48 mg N2O m(-2) h(-1)) and the lowest in the NT-inhibitor (0.20 mg N2O m(-2) h(-1)) and NT-biochar (0.16 mg N2O m(-2) h(-1)) treatments. Significant exponential relationships between soil N2O emission and water filled pore space were revealed in all treatments. However, variations in soil N2O emission among the treatments were positively correlated with the moisture sensitivity of soil N2O emission that likely reflects an interactive effect between soil properties and WFPS.

Conclusion/significance: Our results indicated that improved fertilizer and soil management have the potential to maintain highly productive corn yield while reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus