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Perceived food hypersensitivity relates to poor asthma control and quality of life in young non-atopic asthmatics.

Johnson J, Borres MP, Nordvall L, Lidholm J, Janson C, Alving K, Malinovschi A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A corresponding food allergen sensitization was found in 68% of these subjects.Food hypersensitivity was commonly reported among young asthmatics.In a majority of cases, a corresponding food allergen sensitization was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: The relationship between perceived food hypersensitivity in asthmatics, food allergen sensitization, asthma control and asthma-related quality of life has not been studied.

Objective: Our aim was to study the prevalence of perceived food hypersensitivity in a cohort of young asthmatics, its relation to food allergen sensitization, and any correlation to asthma control and asthma-related quality of life.

Methods: Perceived food hypersensitivity, as well as IgE sensitization to common food allergens, levels of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), and blood eosinophil counts (B-Eos) were assessed in 408 subjects (211 women) with asthma, aged (mean ± SEM) 20.4 ± 0.3 years. Subjects filled out the Asthma Control Test (ACT) and the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (Mini-AQLQ). Inflammation was assessed by means of FeNO and B-Eos.

Results: Fifty-three per cent of subjects reported food hypersensitivity. A corresponding food allergen sensitization was found in 68% of these subjects. Non-atopic subjects with perceived food hypersensitivity (n = 31) had lower ACT (19 (15 - 22) vs. 21 (20 - 23), p < 0.001) and Mini-AQLQ -scores (5.3 (4.3 - 6.1) vs. 6.1 (5.5 - 6.5), p < 0.001) than subjects with no food hypersensitivity (n = 190), despite lower levels of FeNO and B-Eos (p < 0.05).

Conclusions and clinical relevance: Food hypersensitivity was commonly reported among young asthmatics. In a majority of cases, a corresponding food allergen sensitization was found. A novel and clinically important finding was that non-atopic subjects with perceived food hypersensitivity were characterized by poorer asthma control and asthma-related quality of life.

No MeSH data available.


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Mini-AQLQ- and ACT-scores in relation to perceived food hypersensitivity and IgE sensitization status.
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pone.0124675.g002: Mini-AQLQ- and ACT-scores in relation to perceived food hypersensitivity and IgE sensitization status.

Mentions: Non-atopic subjects with perceived food hypersensitivity scored lower on the ACT (Fig 2, S1 Table), and had higher prevalence of not well-controlled asthma (Fig 3A) than subjects without perceived food hypersensitivity. Non-atopic subjects with perceived food hypersensitivity scored lower on overall Mini-AQLQ (Fig 2, S1 Table), as well as on all four domains of the Mini-AQLQ (data not shown), than subjects without perceived food hypersensitivity. Among those without perceived food hypersensitivity, no difference was found between non-atopic and atopic subjects in ACT or Mini-AQLQ scores (S2 Table). Non-atopic subjects with food hypersensitivity had lower ACT and Mini-AQLQ scores as compared to atopic subjects with food hypersensitivity. Furthermore, a trend towards lower ACT score and a lower Mini-AQLQ score were found in non-atopic subjects with food hypersensitivity vs atopic subjects with food hypersensitivity, while no differences in ACT or Mini-AQLQ scores were found in similar analyses in atopic subjects comparing subjects with and without food hypersensitivity (S2 Table).


Perceived food hypersensitivity relates to poor asthma control and quality of life in young non-atopic asthmatics.

Johnson J, Borres MP, Nordvall L, Lidholm J, Janson C, Alving K, Malinovschi A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Mini-AQLQ- and ACT-scores in relation to perceived food hypersensitivity and IgE sensitization status.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414584&req=5

pone.0124675.g002: Mini-AQLQ- and ACT-scores in relation to perceived food hypersensitivity and IgE sensitization status.
Mentions: Non-atopic subjects with perceived food hypersensitivity scored lower on the ACT (Fig 2, S1 Table), and had higher prevalence of not well-controlled asthma (Fig 3A) than subjects without perceived food hypersensitivity. Non-atopic subjects with perceived food hypersensitivity scored lower on overall Mini-AQLQ (Fig 2, S1 Table), as well as on all four domains of the Mini-AQLQ (data not shown), than subjects without perceived food hypersensitivity. Among those without perceived food hypersensitivity, no difference was found between non-atopic and atopic subjects in ACT or Mini-AQLQ scores (S2 Table). Non-atopic subjects with food hypersensitivity had lower ACT and Mini-AQLQ scores as compared to atopic subjects with food hypersensitivity. Furthermore, a trend towards lower ACT score and a lower Mini-AQLQ score were found in non-atopic subjects with food hypersensitivity vs atopic subjects with food hypersensitivity, while no differences in ACT or Mini-AQLQ scores were found in similar analyses in atopic subjects comparing subjects with and without food hypersensitivity (S2 Table).

Bottom Line: A corresponding food allergen sensitization was found in 68% of these subjects.Food hypersensitivity was commonly reported among young asthmatics.In a majority of cases, a corresponding food allergen sensitization was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: The relationship between perceived food hypersensitivity in asthmatics, food allergen sensitization, asthma control and asthma-related quality of life has not been studied.

Objective: Our aim was to study the prevalence of perceived food hypersensitivity in a cohort of young asthmatics, its relation to food allergen sensitization, and any correlation to asthma control and asthma-related quality of life.

Methods: Perceived food hypersensitivity, as well as IgE sensitization to common food allergens, levels of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), and blood eosinophil counts (B-Eos) were assessed in 408 subjects (211 women) with asthma, aged (mean ± SEM) 20.4 ± 0.3 years. Subjects filled out the Asthma Control Test (ACT) and the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (Mini-AQLQ). Inflammation was assessed by means of FeNO and B-Eos.

Results: Fifty-three per cent of subjects reported food hypersensitivity. A corresponding food allergen sensitization was found in 68% of these subjects. Non-atopic subjects with perceived food hypersensitivity (n = 31) had lower ACT (19 (15 - 22) vs. 21 (20 - 23), p < 0.001) and Mini-AQLQ -scores (5.3 (4.3 - 6.1) vs. 6.1 (5.5 - 6.5), p < 0.001) than subjects with no food hypersensitivity (n = 190), despite lower levels of FeNO and B-Eos (p < 0.05).

Conclusions and clinical relevance: Food hypersensitivity was commonly reported among young asthmatics. In a majority of cases, a corresponding food allergen sensitization was found. A novel and clinically important finding was that non-atopic subjects with perceived food hypersensitivity were characterized by poorer asthma control and asthma-related quality of life.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus