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The influence of the environment and clothing on human exposure to ultraviolet light.

Liu J, Zhang W - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensity was measured, and air quality parameters were recorded in 2014 in Beijing, China.Three types of clothing (white polyester cloth, pure cotton white T-shirt, and pure cotton black T-shirt) were individually placed on a mannequin.Ultraviolet B transmission through white polyester cloth was greater under conditions of low air pollution compared with high air pollution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing Obstetrics & Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Objection: The aim of this study is to determine the effect of clothing and the environment on human exposure to ultraviolet light.

Methods: The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensity was measured, and air quality parameters were recorded in 2014 in Beijing, China. Three types of clothing (white polyester cloth, pure cotton white T-shirt, and pure cotton black T-shirt) were individually placed on a mannequin. The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensities were measured above and beneath each article of clothing, and the percentage of ultraviolet light transmission through the clothing was calculated.

Results: (1) The ultraviolet light transmission was significantly higher through white cloth than through black cloth; the transmission was significantly higher through polyester cloth than through cotton. (2) The weather significantly influenced ultraviolet light transmission through white polyester cloth; transmission was highest on clear days and lowest on overcast days (ultraviolet A: P=0.000; ultraviolet B: P=0.008). (3) Air quality parameters (air quality index and particulate matter 2.5 and 10) were inversely related to the ultraviolet light intensity that reached the earth's surface. Ultraviolet B transmission through white polyester cloth was greater under conditions of low air pollution compared with high air pollution.

Conclusion: Clothing color and material and different types of weather affected ultraviolet light transmission; for one particular cloth, the transmission decreased with increasing air pollution.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Ultraviolet light intensity at different anatomical sites.Although the back and the left elbow showed no significant differences in exposure to ultraviolet light, there were significant differences in the UVA and UVB intensities experienced at the four anatomical sites.
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pone.0124758.g009: Ultraviolet light intensity at different anatomical sites.Although the back and the left elbow showed no significant differences in exposure to ultraviolet light, there were significant differences in the UVA and UVB intensities experienced at the four anatomical sites.

Mentions: There were marked differences in the ultraviolet light intensity experienced at the four anatomical sites (Fig 9). The intensities at the xiphoid process, back, left shoulder and left elbow were 490.52±186.75 μW/cm2, 354.58±117.52 μW/cm2, 814.43±315.74 μW/cm2, and 304.56±113.46 μW/cm2, respectively. The intensities at the back and the left elbow were not significantly different (UVA: P = 0.229; UVB: P = 0.186), but the intensities at the xiphoid process and the left shoulder were significantly different (P<0.0001). The sequence of ultraviolet intensity exposure was left shoulder > xiphoid process > left elbow = back.


The influence of the environment and clothing on human exposure to ultraviolet light.

Liu J, Zhang W - PLoS ONE (2015)

Ultraviolet light intensity at different anatomical sites.Although the back and the left elbow showed no significant differences in exposure to ultraviolet light, there were significant differences in the UVA and UVB intensities experienced at the four anatomical sites.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414538&req=5

pone.0124758.g009: Ultraviolet light intensity at different anatomical sites.Although the back and the left elbow showed no significant differences in exposure to ultraviolet light, there were significant differences in the UVA and UVB intensities experienced at the four anatomical sites.
Mentions: There were marked differences in the ultraviolet light intensity experienced at the four anatomical sites (Fig 9). The intensities at the xiphoid process, back, left shoulder and left elbow were 490.52±186.75 μW/cm2, 354.58±117.52 μW/cm2, 814.43±315.74 μW/cm2, and 304.56±113.46 μW/cm2, respectively. The intensities at the back and the left elbow were not significantly different (UVA: P = 0.229; UVB: P = 0.186), but the intensities at the xiphoid process and the left shoulder were significantly different (P<0.0001). The sequence of ultraviolet intensity exposure was left shoulder > xiphoid process > left elbow = back.

Bottom Line: The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensity was measured, and air quality parameters were recorded in 2014 in Beijing, China.Three types of clothing (white polyester cloth, pure cotton white T-shirt, and pure cotton black T-shirt) were individually placed on a mannequin.Ultraviolet B transmission through white polyester cloth was greater under conditions of low air pollution compared with high air pollution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing Obstetrics & Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Objection: The aim of this study is to determine the effect of clothing and the environment on human exposure to ultraviolet light.

Methods: The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensity was measured, and air quality parameters were recorded in 2014 in Beijing, China. Three types of clothing (white polyester cloth, pure cotton white T-shirt, and pure cotton black T-shirt) were individually placed on a mannequin. The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensities were measured above and beneath each article of clothing, and the percentage of ultraviolet light transmission through the clothing was calculated.

Results: (1) The ultraviolet light transmission was significantly higher through white cloth than through black cloth; the transmission was significantly higher through polyester cloth than through cotton. (2) The weather significantly influenced ultraviolet light transmission through white polyester cloth; transmission was highest on clear days and lowest on overcast days (ultraviolet A: P=0.000; ultraviolet B: P=0.008). (3) Air quality parameters (air quality index and particulate matter 2.5 and 10) were inversely related to the ultraviolet light intensity that reached the earth's surface. Ultraviolet B transmission through white polyester cloth was greater under conditions of low air pollution compared with high air pollution.

Conclusion: Clothing color and material and different types of weather affected ultraviolet light transmission; for one particular cloth, the transmission decreased with increasing air pollution.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus