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The influence of the environment and clothing on human exposure to ultraviolet light.

Liu J, Zhang W - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensity was measured, and air quality parameters were recorded in 2014 in Beijing, China.Three types of clothing (white polyester cloth, pure cotton white T-shirt, and pure cotton black T-shirt) were individually placed on a mannequin.Ultraviolet B transmission through white polyester cloth was greater under conditions of low air pollution compared with high air pollution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing Obstetrics & Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Objection: The aim of this study is to determine the effect of clothing and the environment on human exposure to ultraviolet light.

Methods: The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensity was measured, and air quality parameters were recorded in 2014 in Beijing, China. Three types of clothing (white polyester cloth, pure cotton white T-shirt, and pure cotton black T-shirt) were individually placed on a mannequin. The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensities were measured above and beneath each article of clothing, and the percentage of ultraviolet light transmission through the clothing was calculated.

Results: (1) The ultraviolet light transmission was significantly higher through white cloth than through black cloth; the transmission was significantly higher through polyester cloth than through cotton. (2) The weather significantly influenced ultraviolet light transmission through white polyester cloth; transmission was highest on clear days and lowest on overcast days (ultraviolet A: P=0.000; ultraviolet B: P=0.008). (3) Air quality parameters (air quality index and particulate matter 2.5 and 10) were inversely related to the ultraviolet light intensity that reached the earth's surface. Ultraviolet B transmission through white polyester cloth was greater under conditions of low air pollution compared with high air pollution.

Conclusion: Clothing color and material and different types of weather affected ultraviolet light transmission; for one particular cloth, the transmission decreased with increasing air pollution.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The relationship between ultraviolet intensity and humidity and temperature.A/B: Pearson’s correlation analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between temperature and UVA/UVB intensity (UVA: r = 0.7424, P<0.0001; UVB: r = 0.7851, P<0.0001). C/D: Pearson’s correlation analysis showed a significant negative correlation between relative humidity and UVA/UVB intensity (UVA: r = -0.8170, P<0.0001; UVB: r = -0.8007, P<0.0001).
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pone.0124758.g004: The relationship between ultraviolet intensity and humidity and temperature.A/B: Pearson’s correlation analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between temperature and UVA/UVB intensity (UVA: r = 0.7424, P<0.0001; UVB: r = 0.7851, P<0.0001). C/D: Pearson’s correlation analysis showed a significant negative correlation between relative humidity and UVA/UVB intensity (UVA: r = -0.8170, P<0.0001; UVB: r = -0.8007, P<0.0001).

Mentions: There were significant differences in the ultraviolet light intensity on sunny, cloudy and overcast days (UVA: P = 0.000; UVB: P = 0.000). The ultraviolet light intensity was highest on sunny days, followed by cloudy and overcast days. Table 1 and Fig 3 present the changes in the ultraviolet light intensity at different times based on the three weather conditions. In addition, there was a positive correlation between ultraviolet intensity and temperature (UVA:P<0.0001, r = 0.7424; UVB: P<0.0001, r = 0.7851), and dramatic negative correlations were observed between ultraviolet intensity and relative air humidity (UVA:P<0.0001, r = -0.8170; UVB: P<0.0001, r = -0.8007) (Fig 4).


The influence of the environment and clothing on human exposure to ultraviolet light.

Liu J, Zhang W - PLoS ONE (2015)

The relationship between ultraviolet intensity and humidity and temperature.A/B: Pearson’s correlation analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between temperature and UVA/UVB intensity (UVA: r = 0.7424, P<0.0001; UVB: r = 0.7851, P<0.0001). C/D: Pearson’s correlation analysis showed a significant negative correlation between relative humidity and UVA/UVB intensity (UVA: r = -0.8170, P<0.0001; UVB: r = -0.8007, P<0.0001).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414538&req=5

pone.0124758.g004: The relationship between ultraviolet intensity and humidity and temperature.A/B: Pearson’s correlation analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between temperature and UVA/UVB intensity (UVA: r = 0.7424, P<0.0001; UVB: r = 0.7851, P<0.0001). C/D: Pearson’s correlation analysis showed a significant negative correlation between relative humidity and UVA/UVB intensity (UVA: r = -0.8170, P<0.0001; UVB: r = -0.8007, P<0.0001).
Mentions: There were significant differences in the ultraviolet light intensity on sunny, cloudy and overcast days (UVA: P = 0.000; UVB: P = 0.000). The ultraviolet light intensity was highest on sunny days, followed by cloudy and overcast days. Table 1 and Fig 3 present the changes in the ultraviolet light intensity at different times based on the three weather conditions. In addition, there was a positive correlation between ultraviolet intensity and temperature (UVA:P<0.0001, r = 0.7424; UVB: P<0.0001, r = 0.7851), and dramatic negative correlations were observed between ultraviolet intensity and relative air humidity (UVA:P<0.0001, r = -0.8170; UVB: P<0.0001, r = -0.8007) (Fig 4).

Bottom Line: The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensity was measured, and air quality parameters were recorded in 2014 in Beijing, China.Three types of clothing (white polyester cloth, pure cotton white T-shirt, and pure cotton black T-shirt) were individually placed on a mannequin.Ultraviolet B transmission through white polyester cloth was greater under conditions of low air pollution compared with high air pollution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing Obstetrics & Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Objection: The aim of this study is to determine the effect of clothing and the environment on human exposure to ultraviolet light.

Methods: The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensity was measured, and air quality parameters were recorded in 2014 in Beijing, China. Three types of clothing (white polyester cloth, pure cotton white T-shirt, and pure cotton black T-shirt) were individually placed on a mannequin. The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensities were measured above and beneath each article of clothing, and the percentage of ultraviolet light transmission through the clothing was calculated.

Results: (1) The ultraviolet light transmission was significantly higher through white cloth than through black cloth; the transmission was significantly higher through polyester cloth than through cotton. (2) The weather significantly influenced ultraviolet light transmission through white polyester cloth; transmission was highest on clear days and lowest on overcast days (ultraviolet A: P=0.000; ultraviolet B: P=0.008). (3) Air quality parameters (air quality index and particulate matter 2.5 and 10) were inversely related to the ultraviolet light intensity that reached the earth's surface. Ultraviolet B transmission through white polyester cloth was greater under conditions of low air pollution compared with high air pollution.

Conclusion: Clothing color and material and different types of weather affected ultraviolet light transmission; for one particular cloth, the transmission decreased with increasing air pollution.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus