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16S rRNA Amplicon Sequencing Demonstrates that Indoor-Reared Bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) Harbor a Core Subset of Bacteria Normally Associated with the Wild Host.

Meeus I, Parmentier L, Billiet A, Maebe K, Van Nieuwerburgh F, Deforce D, W├Ąckers F, Vandamme P, Smagghe G - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Although Enterobacteriaceae are unreported by non next-generation sequencing studies, it can become a dominant gut resident.Furthermore the presence of some non-core lactobacilli were associated with the relative abundance of bifidobacteria.The impact of the bottleneck microbiota of indoor-reared bumblebees when they are used in the field for pollination purpose is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Agrozoology, Department of Crop Protection, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000, Ghent, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
A MiSeq multiplexed 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the gut microbiota of wild and indoor-reared Bombus terrestris (bumblebees) confirmed the presence of a core set of bacteria, which consisted of Neisseriaceae (Snodgrassella), Orbaceae (Gilliamella), Lactobacillaceae (Lactobacillus), and Bifidobacteriaceae (Bifidobacterium). In wild B. terrestris we detected several non-core bacteria having a more variable prevalence. Although Enterobacteriaceae are unreported by non next-generation sequencing studies, it can become a dominant gut resident. Furthermore the presence of some non-core lactobacilli were associated with the relative abundance of bifidobacteria. This association was not observed in indoor-reared bumblebees lacking the non-core bacteria, but having a more standardized microbiota compared to their wild counterparts. The impact of the bottleneck microbiota of indoor-reared bumblebees when they are used in the field for pollination purpose is discussed.

No MeSH data available.


A) The normalized relative abundance (%) of the different Lactobacillaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae in wild Bombus terrestris. Specimens are ranked from high total Lactobacillaceae to low. B) Pairwise Pearson correlation coefficients, those in bold and underlined have P value below 0.00017.
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pone.0125152.g004: A) The normalized relative abundance (%) of the different Lactobacillaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae in wild Bombus terrestris. Specimens are ranked from high total Lactobacillaceae to low. B) Pairwise Pearson correlation coefficients, those in bold and underlined have P value below 0.00017.

Mentions: An association study between the OTUs present in wild bumblebees revealed several associations between OTUs of the Lactobacillaceae and the Bifidobacteriaceae. These associations were not found in the intensively indoor-reared bumblebees. We used a strong Bonferroni correction resulting in a corrected Alpha of 0.00017 (Fig 4b). Mainly the presence of Lacto5 resulted in a higher relative abundance of different bifidobacteria as represented in Fig 4a.


16S rRNA Amplicon Sequencing Demonstrates that Indoor-Reared Bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) Harbor a Core Subset of Bacteria Normally Associated with the Wild Host.

Meeus I, Parmentier L, Billiet A, Maebe K, Van Nieuwerburgh F, Deforce D, W├Ąckers F, Vandamme P, Smagghe G - PLoS ONE (2015)

A) The normalized relative abundance (%) of the different Lactobacillaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae in wild Bombus terrestris. Specimens are ranked from high total Lactobacillaceae to low. B) Pairwise Pearson correlation coefficients, those in bold and underlined have P value below 0.00017.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414509&req=5

pone.0125152.g004: A) The normalized relative abundance (%) of the different Lactobacillaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae in wild Bombus terrestris. Specimens are ranked from high total Lactobacillaceae to low. B) Pairwise Pearson correlation coefficients, those in bold and underlined have P value below 0.00017.
Mentions: An association study between the OTUs present in wild bumblebees revealed several associations between OTUs of the Lactobacillaceae and the Bifidobacteriaceae. These associations were not found in the intensively indoor-reared bumblebees. We used a strong Bonferroni correction resulting in a corrected Alpha of 0.00017 (Fig 4b). Mainly the presence of Lacto5 resulted in a higher relative abundance of different bifidobacteria as represented in Fig 4a.

Bottom Line: Although Enterobacteriaceae are unreported by non next-generation sequencing studies, it can become a dominant gut resident.Furthermore the presence of some non-core lactobacilli were associated with the relative abundance of bifidobacteria.The impact of the bottleneck microbiota of indoor-reared bumblebees when they are used in the field for pollination purpose is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Agrozoology, Department of Crop Protection, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000, Ghent, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
A MiSeq multiplexed 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the gut microbiota of wild and indoor-reared Bombus terrestris (bumblebees) confirmed the presence of a core set of bacteria, which consisted of Neisseriaceae (Snodgrassella), Orbaceae (Gilliamella), Lactobacillaceae (Lactobacillus), and Bifidobacteriaceae (Bifidobacterium). In wild B. terrestris we detected several non-core bacteria having a more variable prevalence. Although Enterobacteriaceae are unreported by non next-generation sequencing studies, it can become a dominant gut resident. Furthermore the presence of some non-core lactobacilli were associated with the relative abundance of bifidobacteria. This association was not observed in indoor-reared bumblebees lacking the non-core bacteria, but having a more standardized microbiota compared to their wild counterparts. The impact of the bottleneck microbiota of indoor-reared bumblebees when they are used in the field for pollination purpose is discussed.

No MeSH data available.