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Field evaluation of a push-pull system to reduce malaria transmission.

Menger DJ, Omusula P, Holdinga M, Homan T, Carreira AS, Vandendaele P, Derycke JL, Mweresa CK, Mukabana WR, van Loon JJ, Takken W - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Although efforts to control mosquito populations and reduce human-vector contact, such as long-lasting insecticidal nets and indoor residual spraying, have led to significant decreases in malaria incidence, further progress is now threatened by the widespread development of physiological and behavioural insecticide-resistance as well as changes in the composition of vector populations.Using the repellent delta-undecalactone, mosquito house entry was reduced by more than 50%, while the traps caught high numbers of outdoor flying mosquitoes.Model simulations predict that, assuming area-wide coverage, the addition of such a push-pull system to existing prevention efforts will result in up to 20-fold reductions in the entomological inoculation rate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Entomology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8031, 6700 EH, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Malaria continues to place a disease burden on millions of people throughout the tropics, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Although efforts to control mosquito populations and reduce human-vector contact, such as long-lasting insecticidal nets and indoor residual spraying, have led to significant decreases in malaria incidence, further progress is now threatened by the widespread development of physiological and behavioural insecticide-resistance as well as changes in the composition of vector populations. A mosquito-directed push-pull system based on the simultaneous use of attractive and repellent volatiles offers a complementary tool to existing vector-control methods. In this study, the combination of a trap baited with a five-compound attractant and a strip of net-fabric impregnated with micro-encapsulated repellent and placed in the eaves of houses, was tested in a malaria-endemic village in western Kenya. Using the repellent delta-undecalactone, mosquito house entry was reduced by more than 50%, while the traps caught high numbers of outdoor flying mosquitoes. Model simulations predict that, assuming area-wide coverage, the addition of such a push-pull system to existing prevention efforts will result in up to 20-fold reductions in the entomological inoculation rate. Reductions of such magnitude are also predicted when mosquitoes exhibit a high resistance against insecticides. We conclude that a push-pull system based on non-toxic volatiles provides an important addition to existing strategies for malaria prevention.

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Mean number of mosquitoes caught inside the houses.Error bars indicate standard error of the mean (SEM), n = 8 for the baseline data (n = 7 for house 3) and n = 25 for the intervention data. Asterisks indicate a significant difference-in-differences between the control and the intervention: * p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01; *** p < 0.001.
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pone.0123415.g002: Mean number of mosquitoes caught inside the houses.Error bars indicate standard error of the mean (SEM), n = 8 for the baseline data (n = 7 for house 3) and n = 25 for the intervention data. Asterisks indicate a significant difference-in-differences between the control and the intervention: * p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01; *** p < 0.001.

Mentions: Significant reductions in house entry of mosquitoes were found for all interventions (Fig 2). The push-only intervention reduced mosquito house entry by 52.8% compared to the control. The pull-only intervention reduced mosquito house entry by 43.4% and the push-pull intervention reduced mosquito house entry by 51.6% (Table 2).


Field evaluation of a push-pull system to reduce malaria transmission.

Menger DJ, Omusula P, Holdinga M, Homan T, Carreira AS, Vandendaele P, Derycke JL, Mweresa CK, Mukabana WR, van Loon JJ, Takken W - PLoS ONE (2015)

Mean number of mosquitoes caught inside the houses.Error bars indicate standard error of the mean (SEM), n = 8 for the baseline data (n = 7 for house 3) and n = 25 for the intervention data. Asterisks indicate a significant difference-in-differences between the control and the intervention: * p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01; *** p < 0.001.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414508&req=5

pone.0123415.g002: Mean number of mosquitoes caught inside the houses.Error bars indicate standard error of the mean (SEM), n = 8 for the baseline data (n = 7 for house 3) and n = 25 for the intervention data. Asterisks indicate a significant difference-in-differences between the control and the intervention: * p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01; *** p < 0.001.
Mentions: Significant reductions in house entry of mosquitoes were found for all interventions (Fig 2). The push-only intervention reduced mosquito house entry by 52.8% compared to the control. The pull-only intervention reduced mosquito house entry by 43.4% and the push-pull intervention reduced mosquito house entry by 51.6% (Table 2).

Bottom Line: Although efforts to control mosquito populations and reduce human-vector contact, such as long-lasting insecticidal nets and indoor residual spraying, have led to significant decreases in malaria incidence, further progress is now threatened by the widespread development of physiological and behavioural insecticide-resistance as well as changes in the composition of vector populations.Using the repellent delta-undecalactone, mosquito house entry was reduced by more than 50%, while the traps caught high numbers of outdoor flying mosquitoes.Model simulations predict that, assuming area-wide coverage, the addition of such a push-pull system to existing prevention efforts will result in up to 20-fold reductions in the entomological inoculation rate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Entomology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8031, 6700 EH, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Malaria continues to place a disease burden on millions of people throughout the tropics, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Although efforts to control mosquito populations and reduce human-vector contact, such as long-lasting insecticidal nets and indoor residual spraying, have led to significant decreases in malaria incidence, further progress is now threatened by the widespread development of physiological and behavioural insecticide-resistance as well as changes in the composition of vector populations. A mosquito-directed push-pull system based on the simultaneous use of attractive and repellent volatiles offers a complementary tool to existing vector-control methods. In this study, the combination of a trap baited with a five-compound attractant and a strip of net-fabric impregnated with micro-encapsulated repellent and placed in the eaves of houses, was tested in a malaria-endemic village in western Kenya. Using the repellent delta-undecalactone, mosquito house entry was reduced by more than 50%, while the traps caught high numbers of outdoor flying mosquitoes. Model simulations predict that, assuming area-wide coverage, the addition of such a push-pull system to existing prevention efforts will result in up to 20-fold reductions in the entomological inoculation rate. Reductions of such magnitude are also predicted when mosquitoes exhibit a high resistance against insecticides. We conclude that a push-pull system based on non-toxic volatiles provides an important addition to existing strategies for malaria prevention.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus