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Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Non-Native Patients with Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in Shanghai.

Gu FF, Hou Q, Yang HH, Zhu YQ, Guo XK, Ni YX, Han LZ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Overall, antimicrobial susceptibilities of S. aureus isolated from non-native patients were found higher than those from native patients.ST7 was found in 12 isolates and all 12 isolates were found in native patients.The livestock-associated clone ST398 was found in 11 isolates (6 from non-native patients; 5 from native patients), and 5 ST398 lukS/F-PV-positive methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) were all discovered among non-native patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Microbiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Staphylococcus aureus is one predominant cause of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), but little information exists regarding the characterization of S. aureus from non-native patients with SSTIs in China.

Methods: In this study, we enrolled 52 non-native patients with S. aureus SSTIs, and 65 native control patients with S. aureus SSTIs in Shanghai. 52 and 65 S. aureus isolates were collected from both groups, respectively. S. aureus isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, toxin gene detection, and molecular typing with sequence type, spa type, agr group and SCCmec type.

Results: Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was detected in 8 non-native patients and 14 native patients with SSTIs. Overall, antimicrobial susceptibilities of S. aureus isolated from non-native patients were found higher than those from native patients. CC59 (ST338 and ST59) was found in a total of 14 isolates (4 from non-native patients; 10 from native patients), 9 of which were carrying lukS/F-PV (3 from non-native patients; 6 from native patients). ST7 was found in 12 isolates and all 12 isolates were found in native patients. The livestock-associated clone ST398 was found in 11 isolates (6 from non-native patients; 5 from native patients), and 5 ST398 lukS/F-PV-positive methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) were all discovered among non-native patients. The molecular epidemiology of S. aureus isolated from non-native patients was quite different from those from native patients. lukS/F-PV was more frequent in isolates originating from non-native patients with SSTIs compared to native patients (31 vs. 7, P <0.0001).

Conclusions: CC59 was the most common clonal complex among patients with SSTIs in Shanghai. The other most common sequence types were ST7 and Livestock ST398. The molecular epidemiology of S. aureus isolated from non-native patients was quite different from those from native patients. S. aureus isolated from non-native patients was more likely to carry lukS/F-PV.

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The rough sketch produced by eBURST with the stringent (default) group definition, representing the S. aureuspopulation and the positions of 117 isolates.These isolates were classified into six groups and fifteen singletons. Each number represents an MLST ST. The ST of the predicted founder is represented by a blue circle and the area of each circle indicates the prevalence of the ST in the MLST data of this study.
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pone.0123557.g001: The rough sketch produced by eBURST with the stringent (default) group definition, representing the S. aureuspopulation and the positions of 117 isolates.These isolates were classified into six groups and fifteen singletons. Each number represents an MLST ST. The ST of the predicted founder is represented by a blue circle and the area of each circle indicates the prevalence of the ST in the MLST data of this study.

Mentions: Among the 117 S. aureus isolates, 31 sequence types (STs) and 59 spa types were identified (S1 Table). We detected 8 SCCmec type I, 4 SCCmec type II, 2 SCCmec type III, 3 SCCmec type IV, and 4 SCCmec type V isolates. One MRSA isolate could not be SCCmec typed. As seen in Table 3, MRSA and MSSA isolates from both non-native patients and native patients expressed a great diversity in molecular epidemiologic characteristics. Only one specific clone, ST338-SCCmecV-t437 was present in MRSA isolates from both non-native patients and native patients. As shown in Table 3, we discovered a few characteristics to be similar among clones from S. aureus isolates from non-native patients and native patients. The most common ST was ST7 (12/117, 10.3%), followed by ST338 (11/117, 9.4%), ST398 (11/117, 9.4%) and ST217 (8/117, 6.8%). All 12 ST7 isolates were sourced from native patients, and all 8 ST217 isolates were isolated from non-native patients. ST338 was discovered in 3 isolates from non-native patients and 8 isolates from native patients, and ST398 was found in 6 isolates from non-native patients and 5 isolates from native patients.ST338 was the most common ST in lukS/F-PV-positive isolates, including 3 isolates (2 MRSA and 1 MSSA) from non-native patient and 5 isolates (4 MRSA and 1 MSSA) from native patients. The other most common STs in lukS/F-PV-positive isolates were ST217 (6 MSSA), ST398 (5 MSSA) and ST88 (4 MSSA and 1 MRSA), and these 16 isolates all originated from non-native patients. The relationships of 117 S. aureus isolates are shown in a diagram produced by eBURST based on the MLST data of this study, and are shown in Fig 1. These isolates were classified into six groups and fifteen singletons with the stringent (default) group definition of six or more shared alleles. The main groups contain CC8 (ST8, ST239, ST630 and ST1821), CC59 (ST59 and ST338) and CC5 (ST5, ST764 and ST965).


Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Non-Native Patients with Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in Shanghai.

Gu FF, Hou Q, Yang HH, Zhu YQ, Guo XK, Ni YX, Han LZ - PLoS ONE (2015)

The rough sketch produced by eBURST with the stringent (default) group definition, representing the S. aureuspopulation and the positions of 117 isolates.These isolates were classified into six groups and fifteen singletons. Each number represents an MLST ST. The ST of the predicted founder is represented by a blue circle and the area of each circle indicates the prevalence of the ST in the MLST data of this study.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414503&req=5

pone.0123557.g001: The rough sketch produced by eBURST with the stringent (default) group definition, representing the S. aureuspopulation and the positions of 117 isolates.These isolates were classified into six groups and fifteen singletons. Each number represents an MLST ST. The ST of the predicted founder is represented by a blue circle and the area of each circle indicates the prevalence of the ST in the MLST data of this study.
Mentions: Among the 117 S. aureus isolates, 31 sequence types (STs) and 59 spa types were identified (S1 Table). We detected 8 SCCmec type I, 4 SCCmec type II, 2 SCCmec type III, 3 SCCmec type IV, and 4 SCCmec type V isolates. One MRSA isolate could not be SCCmec typed. As seen in Table 3, MRSA and MSSA isolates from both non-native patients and native patients expressed a great diversity in molecular epidemiologic characteristics. Only one specific clone, ST338-SCCmecV-t437 was present in MRSA isolates from both non-native patients and native patients. As shown in Table 3, we discovered a few characteristics to be similar among clones from S. aureus isolates from non-native patients and native patients. The most common ST was ST7 (12/117, 10.3%), followed by ST338 (11/117, 9.4%), ST398 (11/117, 9.4%) and ST217 (8/117, 6.8%). All 12 ST7 isolates were sourced from native patients, and all 8 ST217 isolates were isolated from non-native patients. ST338 was discovered in 3 isolates from non-native patients and 8 isolates from native patients, and ST398 was found in 6 isolates from non-native patients and 5 isolates from native patients.ST338 was the most common ST in lukS/F-PV-positive isolates, including 3 isolates (2 MRSA and 1 MSSA) from non-native patient and 5 isolates (4 MRSA and 1 MSSA) from native patients. The other most common STs in lukS/F-PV-positive isolates were ST217 (6 MSSA), ST398 (5 MSSA) and ST88 (4 MSSA and 1 MRSA), and these 16 isolates all originated from non-native patients. The relationships of 117 S. aureus isolates are shown in a diagram produced by eBURST based on the MLST data of this study, and are shown in Fig 1. These isolates were classified into six groups and fifteen singletons with the stringent (default) group definition of six or more shared alleles. The main groups contain CC8 (ST8, ST239, ST630 and ST1821), CC59 (ST59 and ST338) and CC5 (ST5, ST764 and ST965).

Bottom Line: Overall, antimicrobial susceptibilities of S. aureus isolated from non-native patients were found higher than those from native patients.ST7 was found in 12 isolates and all 12 isolates were found in native patients.The livestock-associated clone ST398 was found in 11 isolates (6 from non-native patients; 5 from native patients), and 5 ST398 lukS/F-PV-positive methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) were all discovered among non-native patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Microbiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Staphylococcus aureus is one predominant cause of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), but little information exists regarding the characterization of S. aureus from non-native patients with SSTIs in China.

Methods: In this study, we enrolled 52 non-native patients with S. aureus SSTIs, and 65 native control patients with S. aureus SSTIs in Shanghai. 52 and 65 S. aureus isolates were collected from both groups, respectively. S. aureus isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, toxin gene detection, and molecular typing with sequence type, spa type, agr group and SCCmec type.

Results: Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was detected in 8 non-native patients and 14 native patients with SSTIs. Overall, antimicrobial susceptibilities of S. aureus isolated from non-native patients were found higher than those from native patients. CC59 (ST338 and ST59) was found in a total of 14 isolates (4 from non-native patients; 10 from native patients), 9 of which were carrying lukS/F-PV (3 from non-native patients; 6 from native patients). ST7 was found in 12 isolates and all 12 isolates were found in native patients. The livestock-associated clone ST398 was found in 11 isolates (6 from non-native patients; 5 from native patients), and 5 ST398 lukS/F-PV-positive methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) were all discovered among non-native patients. The molecular epidemiology of S. aureus isolated from non-native patients was quite different from those from native patients. lukS/F-PV was more frequent in isolates originating from non-native patients with SSTIs compared to native patients (31 vs. 7, P <0.0001).

Conclusions: CC59 was the most common clonal complex among patients with SSTIs in Shanghai. The other most common sequence types were ST7 and Livestock ST398. The molecular epidemiology of S. aureus isolated from non-native patients was quite different from those from native patients. S. aureus isolated from non-native patients was more likely to carry lukS/F-PV.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus