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Cathepsin Gene Family Reveals Transcriptome Patterns Related to the Infective Stages of the Salmon Louse Caligus rogercresseyi.

Maldonado-Aguayo W, Chávez-Mardones J, Gonçalves AT, Gallardo-Escárate C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, 56 cathepsin-like sequences were found distributed in five cysteine protease groups (B, F, L, Z, and S) as well as in an aspartic protease group (D).Putative functional roles of cathepsins were conjectured based on the differential expressions found and on roles previously described in other phylogenetically related species.The identification of cathepsins together with functional validations represents a valuable strategy for pinpointing target molecules that could be used in the development of new delousing drugs or vaccines against C. rogercresseyi.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Biotechnology and Aquatic Genomics, Interdisciplinary Center for Sustainable Aquaculture Research (INCAR), University of Concepción, Concepción, Chile.

ABSTRACT
Cathepsins are proteases involved in the ability of parasites to overcome and/or modulate host defenses so as to complete their own lifecycle. However, the mechanisms underlying this ability of cathepsins are still poorly understood. One excellent model for identifying and exploring the molecular functions of cathepsins is the marine ectoparasitic copepod Caligus rogercresseyi that currently affects the Chilean salmon industry. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, 56 cathepsin-like sequences were found distributed in five cysteine protease groups (B, F, L, Z, and S) as well as in an aspartic protease group (D). Ontogenic transcriptome analysis evidenced that L cathepsins were the most abundant during the lifecycle, while cathepsins B and K were mostly expressed in the larval stages and adult females, thus suggesting participation in the molting processes and embryonic development, respectively. Interestingly, a variety of cathepsins from groups Z, L, D, B, K, and S were upregulated in the infective stage of copepodid, corroborating the complexity of the processes involved in the parasitic success of this copepod. Putative functional roles of cathepsins were conjectured based on the differential expressions found and on roles previously described in other phylogenetically related species. Moreover, 140 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were identified in transcripts annotated for cysteine and aspartic proteases located into untranslated regions, or the coding region. This study reports for the first time the presence of cathepsin-like genes and differential expressions throughout a copepod lifecycle. The identification of cathepsins together with functional validations represents a valuable strategy for pinpointing target molecules that could be used in the development of new delousing drugs or vaccines against C. rogercresseyi.

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Diversity and abundance of cathepsin encoding transcripts in crustaceans based on available expressed sequence tag in NCBI (dataset with >10,000 ESTs as of 10th June 2014).
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pone.0123954.g001: Diversity and abundance of cathepsin encoding transcripts in crustaceans based on available expressed sequence tag in NCBI (dataset with >10,000 ESTs as of 10th June 2014).

Mentions: The 56 cathepsins sequences identified for C. rogercresseyi were used as a reference for investigating their presence in other crustacean species. Of the 18 species present in the crustacean EST database, only 11 have reported EST sequences for cathepsins (Fig 1). The cathepsin L group was the most abundant between analyzed species, whereas cathepsin B was found in only Penaeus monodon and Homarus americanus, while cathepsin K was found only in Penaeus monodon (Fig 1). Similar to that described in other crustaceans, L-like cathepsin transcripts in C. rogercresseyi were the most abundant across all eight developmental stages, followed by cathepsins B and Z (Fig 2).


Cathepsin Gene Family Reveals Transcriptome Patterns Related to the Infective Stages of the Salmon Louse Caligus rogercresseyi.

Maldonado-Aguayo W, Chávez-Mardones J, Gonçalves AT, Gallardo-Escárate C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Diversity and abundance of cathepsin encoding transcripts in crustaceans based on available expressed sequence tag in NCBI (dataset with >10,000 ESTs as of 10th June 2014).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414500&req=5

pone.0123954.g001: Diversity and abundance of cathepsin encoding transcripts in crustaceans based on available expressed sequence tag in NCBI (dataset with >10,000 ESTs as of 10th June 2014).
Mentions: The 56 cathepsins sequences identified for C. rogercresseyi were used as a reference for investigating their presence in other crustacean species. Of the 18 species present in the crustacean EST database, only 11 have reported EST sequences for cathepsins (Fig 1). The cathepsin L group was the most abundant between analyzed species, whereas cathepsin B was found in only Penaeus monodon and Homarus americanus, while cathepsin K was found only in Penaeus monodon (Fig 1). Similar to that described in other crustaceans, L-like cathepsin transcripts in C. rogercresseyi were the most abundant across all eight developmental stages, followed by cathepsins B and Z (Fig 2).

Bottom Line: Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, 56 cathepsin-like sequences were found distributed in five cysteine protease groups (B, F, L, Z, and S) as well as in an aspartic protease group (D).Putative functional roles of cathepsins were conjectured based on the differential expressions found and on roles previously described in other phylogenetically related species.The identification of cathepsins together with functional validations represents a valuable strategy for pinpointing target molecules that could be used in the development of new delousing drugs or vaccines against C. rogercresseyi.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Biotechnology and Aquatic Genomics, Interdisciplinary Center for Sustainable Aquaculture Research (INCAR), University of Concepción, Concepción, Chile.

ABSTRACT
Cathepsins are proteases involved in the ability of parasites to overcome and/or modulate host defenses so as to complete their own lifecycle. However, the mechanisms underlying this ability of cathepsins are still poorly understood. One excellent model for identifying and exploring the molecular functions of cathepsins is the marine ectoparasitic copepod Caligus rogercresseyi that currently affects the Chilean salmon industry. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, 56 cathepsin-like sequences were found distributed in five cysteine protease groups (B, F, L, Z, and S) as well as in an aspartic protease group (D). Ontogenic transcriptome analysis evidenced that L cathepsins were the most abundant during the lifecycle, while cathepsins B and K were mostly expressed in the larval stages and adult females, thus suggesting participation in the molting processes and embryonic development, respectively. Interestingly, a variety of cathepsins from groups Z, L, D, B, K, and S were upregulated in the infective stage of copepodid, corroborating the complexity of the processes involved in the parasitic success of this copepod. Putative functional roles of cathepsins were conjectured based on the differential expressions found and on roles previously described in other phylogenetically related species. Moreover, 140 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were identified in transcripts annotated for cysteine and aspartic proteases located into untranslated regions, or the coding region. This study reports for the first time the presence of cathepsin-like genes and differential expressions throughout a copepod lifecycle. The identification of cathepsins together with functional validations represents a valuable strategy for pinpointing target molecules that could be used in the development of new delousing drugs or vaccines against C. rogercresseyi.

Show MeSH